1

I'm trying to create a simple function timer/profiler. My main objective is to create a function that I can quickly, easily and unobtrusively add to any function calls that I want to profile.

So for instance to profile foo, bar, and baz I want to have a ft (function timer) function that can do the following, affecting the original code as little as possible:

ft(foo());
ft(bar(1, 2, 3));
int result = ft(baz());
string result = ft(qux("a", 2, 3.4));

Note, in the case of baz and qux, the result returned from ft should be what the functions themselves return.

ft handles all of the timing and logging etc.

I have come across several threads that mention how to do function callbacks for functions with arbitrary arguments, but not so many that even mention how to handle the return value.

This comes the closest: Variable number of arguments (va_list) with a function callback? but I get tied in knots while trying to handle void functions as well as functions that return a value.

I'm starting to think using macros is the way to do this but maybe there's a better way.

Here's my current feeble attempt (abridged):

static Timer fTimer;

class VoidFuncBase
{
public:
  virtual void operator()() = 0;
};

class VoidFuncWrapper0 : public VoidFuncBase
{
public:
  typedef void (*func)();
  VoidFuncWrapper0(func fp) : fp_(fp) { }
  void operator()() { fp_(); }
private:
  func fp_;
};

template<typename P1>
class VoidFuncWrapper1 : public VoidFuncBase
{
public:
  typedef void (*func)(const P1 &);
  VoidFuncWrapper1(func fp, const P1 &p1) : fp_(fp), p1_(p1) { }
  void operator()() { fp_(p1_); }
private:
  func fp_;
  P1 p1_;
};

template<typename P1, typename P2>
class VoidFuncWrapper2 : public VoidFuncBase
{
public:
  typedef void (*func)(const P1 &, const P2 &);
  VoidFuncWrapper2(func fp, const P1 &p1, const P2 &p2)
    : fp_(fp), p1_(p1), p2_(p2) { }
  void operator()() { fp_(p1_, p2_); }
private:
  func fp_;
  P1 p1_;
  P2 p2_;
};

template<typename R>
class FuncBase
{
public:
  virtual R operator()() = 0;
};

template<typename R>
class FuncWrapper0 : public FuncBase<R>
{
public:
  typedef R (*func)();
  FuncWrapper0(func fp) : fp_(fp) { }
  R operator()() { return fp_(); }
private:
  func fp_;
};

template<typename R, typename P1>
class FuncWrapper1 : public FuncBase<R>
{
public:
  typedef R (*func)(const P1 &);
  FuncWrapper1(func fp, const P1 &p1) : fp_(fp), p1_(p1) { }
  R operator()() { return fp_(p1_); }
private:
  func fp_;
  P1 p1_;
};

template<typename R, typename P1, typename P2>
class FuncWrapper2 : public FuncBase<R>
{
public:
  typedef R (*func)(const P1 &, const P2 &);
  FuncWrapper2(func fp, const P1 &p1, const P2 &p2)
    : fp_(fp), p1_(p1), p2_(p2) { }
  R operator()() { return fp_(p1_, p2_); }
private:
  func fp_;
  P1 p1_;
  P2 p2_;
};

template<typename R>
R ft(FuncBase<R> func, std::string functionName)
{
    unsigned long threadId = getThreadId();
    double startTimeMs = fTimer.getMilliseconds();

    R result = func();

    double duration = fTimer.getMilliseconds() - startTimeMs;
    logf("%u %s took %fms", threadId, functionName.c_str(), duration);

    return result;
}

void ft(VoidFuncBase func, std::string functionName, int logTimeoutMs)
{
    unsigned long threadId = getThreadId();
    double startTimeMs = timer.getMilliseconds();

    func();

    double duration = timer.getMilliseconds() - startTimeMs;
    logf("%u %s took %fms", threadId, functionName.c_str(), duration);
}

Currently I'm getting

"error: cannot declare parameter 'func' to be of abstract type 'VoidFuncBase'".

But I am probably headed in the wrong direction with this anyway.

  • In c++11 there is a nice std::function. In c++03, it is pain in the neck to do, cause you have to create all kinds of template classes and functions – BЈовић Mar 9 '12 at 13:39
  • @VJovic: All kinds, as in non type template parameters, expression templates, type traits, curiously recurring template pattern, ..., ? – Sebastian Mach Mar 9 '12 at 13:52
  • There is no language called C/C++. – Sebastian Mach Mar 9 '12 at 13:53
  • I know there's no language called C/C++ but I used that to indicate that I would value either a C or C++ based implementation. – Pryo Mar 9 '12 at 16:08
  • I would suggest a different way to do profiling, as it is done in Zoom. You need to be able to read the call stack, and do it on interrupt. If 100 samples are taken, and a line occurs on 40% of them, then if you could eliminate that line, total time would be reduced by 40%. (That's a speedup of 1.67 or 67%.) So it doesn't just find costly functions, it finds costly lines. It doesn't need to be super accurate, or super efficient. It finds them anyway, and recursion doesn't bother it in the slightest. – Mike Dunlavey Mar 11 '12 at 1:47
3

Variadic templates are the way to go! In any case, you'll need to change how the function is called slightly:

template <typename R, typename... T, typename... A>
R ft(R (*f)(T...), A&&... a) {
    // do you business
    return f(std::forward<A>(a)...);
}

int r0 = ft(&baz);
int r1 = ft(&qax, a, b, c);

Things become interesting when the functions are overloaded, though. Note that any processing after the call just goes into the destructor of an object set up prior to the call.

  • Take a note that the OP didn't say he can use c++11 features – BЈовић Mar 9 '12 at 13:46
  • @VJovic: And he did not mention otherwise ... C++11 is the current standard. – Sebastian Mach Mar 9 '12 at 13:49
  • @VJovic: He did not say he cannot do it either, and C++11 happens to be the current standard. This is one particular problem that is easy to solve in C++11 and a pain in C++03 for different reasons. Without variadic templates you would need to provide all overloads manually (boost preprocessor might help but its not simple code to write/read/maintain), and without rvalue-references you cannot have perfect forwarding which means that you cannot mimic the semantics of the original code completely unless you are willing to implement the exponential possibilities of cv combinations. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 9 '12 at 13:54
  • 1
    @VJovic: I have no reason to assume that a non-standard compiler is being use (well, except for the minor detail that there is no such thing). Even if he cannot use this solution it is worth pointing out how a proper solution would look like. If he needs a C++ 2003 solution he will have to accept more contortions for a solid solution. – Dietmar Kühl Mar 9 '12 at 14:34
  • C++11 introduced these new features because there was a good reason to. There are reasonable functions (such as this) that required unreasonable amounts of code in C++98. – MSalters Mar 9 '12 at 15:34
2

Deitmar's answer was 95% of the solution but here are the adjustments I made to get it to work in my case:

  1. In order to do support functions with void return type I needed to add a specific template for this case.
  2. I need to call methods as opposed to pure functions, so I needed to adjust the way the function is referred to.
  3. Maybe because of 2 I found I needed to pass in the object that the function is being called on. Perhaps this is not actually necessary but it's the only way I could get it to work.
  4. I want to do some work after the function callback, but before ft returns, so there's some simple modifications to the code for that.
  5. I need to pass in additional info for each call, namely a string of the function name so I can do sensible logging.

Here's the working code (abridged).

template <class C, typename R, typename... T, typename... A>
R ft(C* obj, R (C::*func)(T...), std::string functionName, A&&... args)
{
    double startTimeMs = fTimer.getMilliseconds();

    //extra pre-call work

    R result = (obj->*func)(std::forward<A>(args)...);

    //extra post-call work

    double duration = fTimer.getMilliseconds() - startTimeMs;
    logf("%s took %fms", functionName.c_str(), duration);

    return result;
}

template <class C, typename... T, typename... A>
void ft(C* obj, void (C::*func)(T...), std::string functionName, A&&... args)
{
    double startTimeMs = fTimer.getMilliseconds();

    //extra pre-call work

    (obj->*func)(std::forward<A>(args)...);

    //extra post-call work

    double duration = fTimer.getMilliseconds() - startTimeMs;
    logf("%s took %fms", functionName.c_str(), duration);
}

Function calls are then made like this:

For a method of this object with the signature void Foo::bar(int arg);

ft(this, &Foo::bar, "Foo::bar", (3));

When dealing with an object from a subclass, I had to check what object type is involved. Maybe there is a generic way to do this, but this isn't it!:

Shape* shape = getShape();
double area = 0.0;
if(shape->getType() == SQUARE)
{
    area = ft((Square*)shape, &Square::getArea, "Square::getArea");
}
else if(shape->getType() == TRIANGLE)
{
    area = ft((Triangle*)shape, &Triangle::getArea, "Triangle::getArea");

}
else if(shape->getType() == CIRCLE)
{
    area = ft((Circle*)shape, &Circle::getArea, "Circle::getArea");
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.