7

I've got the following table, with the first line containing 2 sub-lines and the second one containing 3 sublines.

Whith this css style, the zebra color (i.e. alternate color on two consecutive rows) is faulty, second main cell shall be white, and not gray:

 tr:nth-child(odd)  {background-color: #eee;}
 tr:nth-child(even) {background-color: #fff;}

Faulty zebra with nth-child css

So is there a way to zebra color such a table the right way?

Of course, my real problem deals with much more rows, with a much more variable number of sub-lines.

<head>
    <style>
        tr:nth-child(odd)  {background-color: #eee;}
        tr:nth-child(even) {background-color: #fff;}
    </style>
<head>
<body>
    <table border="1">
        <tr>
            <td rowspan="2">
                Big1
            </td>
            <td>
                small1
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>
                small2
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td rowspan="3">
                Big2
            </td>
            <td>
                small1
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>
                small2
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>
                small3
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body> 
6
  • What is a "zebra color"?
    – Oded
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:24
  • Added a definition for zebra color: alternate color on two consecutive rows
    – Vinzz
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:26
  • What do you want the zebra stripes to look like?
    – BoltClock
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:27
  • On the included image, I want Big2 to be white, and not gray, as it's consecutive to a gray cell (Big1)
    – Vinzz
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:28
  • What you're seeing is the "right" way. You have cells spanning multiple rows, so you'll have to assign specific colors to each cell.
    – SenorAmor
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:29

1 Answer 1

1

It works as it is laid out.

It isnt working as

    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2">
            Big1
        </td>
        <td>
            small1
        </td>
    </tr>

will be grey, it's the first TR (odd)

    <tr>
        <td>
            small2
        </td>
    </tr>

will be white, its the second TR (even) etc.

Best way to do it will be to assign 'odd' and 'even' classes to the tr in question manually.

1
  • Indeed, I reached the same conclusion. Thanks, You've got the points
    – Vinzz
    Mar 9, 2012 at 15:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.