7

I am using openssl to get data about x509 certificate. Is there a way to convert ASN1_INTEGER to ASN1_STRING, which can than easily be transformed to char array? Is there a way to convert it to any other human readable format?

EDIT: I'm using openssl compiled for iOS, as I am having the iOS project. Here is the code I am using to extract the serial number from the certificate:

ASN1_INTEGER *serial = X509_get_serialNumber(certificateX509);
long value = ASN1_INTEGER_get(serial);
NSLog(@"Serial %ld", value);

certificateX509 is a valid X509 object and I have managed to get some other fields from it (issuer name, expiry date and so on)

EDIT 2:
I finally came to a solution, which may not be the most straightforward one:

 ASN1_INTEGER *serial = X509_get_serialNumber(certificateX509);
 BIGNUM *bnser = ASN1_INTEGER_to_BN(serial, NULL);
 int n = BN_num_bytes(bnser);
 unsigned char outbuf[n];
 int bin = BN_bn2bin(bnser, outbuf);
 char *hexbuf = (char*) outbuf;

hexBuf then contains characters whose value needs to be read as hex integer in order to retrieve logical values. I use NSMutableString to create a human readable string:

NSMutableString *str = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    NSString *temp = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.6x", hexbuf[i]];
    [str appendString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ ", temp]];
}

If there is a simpler way, I would really like to know it.

10

The ascii hex conversion be done more simply using the built in BN_bn2hex(BIGNUM *) function

ASN1_INTEGER *serial = X509_get_serialNumber(certificateX509);
BIGNUM *bnser = ASN1_INTEGER_to_BN(serial, NULL);
char *asciiHex = BN_bn2hex(bnser);
5

One possibility is that you can extract the value of the ASN1_INTEGER as a normal C integer:

#include <openssl/asn1.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  long value;
  ASN1_INTEGER asn1int = {0};

  ASN1_INTEGER_set(&asn1int, 42);
  value = ASN1_INTEGER_get(&asn1int);
  printf("The value is %ld.\n", value);

  return 0;
}

Compiled like this:

gcc -Wall -o sploots sploots.c -lcrypto

this produces the output:

The value is 42.

To have the value as a string in an array of char, use snprintf.

I suspect there are also possibilities for using the BIO printing routines to dump the value to a BIO of some sort (perhaps a memory BIO). However, this approach seems simpler.

The way I arrived at this answer is that I looked through the OpenSSL headers for ASN1_INTEGER. After looking around for suitable APIs for a BIO-based solution, I noticed the ASN1_INTEGER_get function.

Looking around in OpenSSL header files is typically the way I learn how to use OpenSSL, since so much of the API is undocumented or incorrectly or incompletely documented.

  • Not sure what he's asking about, but for certificate serial numbers it's probably not very useful. For example, I've checked one certificate and the serial number is "‎3c 08 cf ee be 9f eb c4 2b b1 3e e0 3d 62 0b df". It's true that there's no other way but opening the header files and digging out the information, though. – Omri Barel Mar 10 '12 at 18:47
  • you are right, that doesn't work for me. I always get -1 as a long value – Maggie Mar 10 '12 at 21:32
  • It sounds like you're not getting an ASN1_INTEGER out of the certificate. Perhaps it's a BIGNUM? Can you add the code you used to extract it from the certificate to the question? – Jean-Paul Calderone Mar 10 '12 at 22:25
  • I have edited my question, please have a look. – Maggie Mar 11 '12 at 15:57
2

I finally came to a solution, which may not be the most straightforward one:

 ASN1_INTEGER *serial = X509_get_serialNumber(certificateX509);
 BIGNUM *bnser = ASN1_INTEGER_to_BN(serial, NULL);
 int n = BN_num_bytes(bnser);
 unsigned char outbuf[n];
 int bin = BN_bn2bin(bnser, outbuf);
 char *hexBuf = (char*) outbuf;

hexBuf then contains characters whose value needs to be read as hex integer in order to retrieve logical values. I use NSMutableString to create a human readable string:

 NSMutableString *str = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
    for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    NSString *temp = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.6x", hexbuf[i]];
    [str appendString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ ", temp]];
}
1

If you just want a readable NSString, BN_bn2dec is more consize than BN_bn2hex or BN_bn2bin.
No need to mess with hex encoding.

Here's my way, in iOS/ObjC, using pod 'OpenSSL-Universal', '1.0.2.10' :

ASN1_INTEGER *serialAsn1 = X509_get_serialNumber(certX509);
BIGNUM *serialBigNumber = ASN1_INTEGER_to_BN(serialAsn1, NULL);
char *serialChar = BN_bn2dec(serialBigNumber);

NSString *serialString = [NSString stringWithCString:(const char *) serialChar
                                            encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

Cheers.

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