1823

I want to get the filename (without extension) and the extension separately.

The best solution I found so far is:

NAME=`echo "$FILE" | cut -d'.' -f1`
EXTENSION=`echo "$FILE" | cut -d'.' -f2`

This is wrong because it doesn't work if the file name contains multiple . characters. If, let's say, I have a.b.js, it will consider a and b.js, instead of a.b and js.

It can be easily done in Python with

file, ext = os.path.splitext(path)

but I'd prefer not to fire up a Python interpreter just for this, if possible.

Any better ideas?

  • This question explains this bash technique and several other related ones. – jjclarkson Jun 12 '09 at 20:34
  • 22
    When applying the great answers below, do not simply paste in your variable like I show here Wrong: extension="{$filename##*.}" like I did for a while! Move the $ outside the curlys: Right: extension="${filename##*.}" – Chris K Aug 7 '13 at 18:51
  • 3
    This is clearly a non-trivial problem and for me it is hard to tell if the answers below are completely correct. It's amazing this is not a built in operation in (ba)sh (answers seem to implement the function using pattern matching). I decided to use Python's os.path.splitext as above instead... – Peter Gibson Oct 1 '15 at 8:01
  • 1
    As extension have to represent nature of a file, there is a magic command which check file to divine his nature and offert standard extension. see my answer – F. Hauri Oct 14 '16 at 8:02
  • 2
    The question is problematic in the first place because.. From the perspective of the OS and unix file-systems in general, there is no such thing as a file extension. Using a "." to separate parts is a human convention, that only works as long as humans agree to follow it. For example, with the 'tar' program, it could have been decided to name output files with a "tar." prefix instead of a ".tar" suffix -- Giving "tar.somedir" instead of "somedir.tar". There is no "general, always works" solution because of this--you have to write code that matches your specific needs and expected filenames. – C. M. Oct 10 '18 at 0:08

36 Answers 36

0

Here is the algorithm I used for finding the name and extension of a file when I wrote a Bash script to make names unique when names conflicted with respect to casing.

#! /bin/bash 

#
# Finds 
# -- name and extension pairs
# -- null extension when there isn't an extension.
# -- Finds name of a hidden file without an extension
# 

declare -a fileNames=(
  '.Montreal' 
  '.Rome.txt' 
  'Loundon.txt' 
  'Paris' 
  'San Diego.txt'
  'San Francisco' 
  )

echo "Script ${0} finding name and extension pairs."
echo 

for theFileName in "${fileNames[@]}"
do
     echo "theFileName=${theFileName}"  

     # Get the proposed name by chopping off the extension
     name="${theFileName%.*}"

     # get extension.  Set to null when there isn't an extension
     # Thanks to mklement0 in a comment above.
     extension=$([[ "$theFileName" == *.* ]] && echo ".${theFileName##*.}" || echo '')

     # a hidden file without extenson?
     if [ "${theFileName}" = "${extension}" ] ; then
         # hidden file without extension.  Fixup.
         name=${theFileName}
         extension=""
     fi

     echo "  name=${name}"
     echo "  extension=${extension}"
done 

The test run.

$ config/Name\&Extension.bash 
Script config/Name&Extension.bash finding name and extension pairs.

theFileName=.Montreal
  name=.Montreal
  extension=
theFileName=.Rome.txt
  name=.Rome
  extension=.txt
theFileName=Loundon.txt
  name=Loundon
  extension=.txt
theFileName=Paris
  name=Paris
  extension=
theFileName=San Diego.txt
  name=San Diego
  extension=.txt
theFileName=San Francisco
  name=San Francisco
  extension=
$ 

FYI: The complete transliteration program and more test cases can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/4c6m0f2e28a1vxf/avoid-clashes-code.zip?dl=0

0

Using example file /Users/Jonathan/Scripts/bash/MyScript.sh, this code:

MY_EXT=".${0##*.}"
ME=$(/usr/bin/basename "${0}" "${MY_EXT}")

will result in ${ME} being MyScript and ${MY_EXT} being .sh:


Script:

#!/bin/bash
set -e

MY_EXT=".${0##*.}"
ME=$(/usr/bin/basename "${0}" "${MY_EXT}")

echo "${ME} - ${MY_EXT}"

Some tests:

$ ./MyScript.sh 
MyScript - .sh

$ bash MyScript.sh
MyScript - .sh

$ /Users/Jonathan/Scripts/bash/MyScript.sh
MyScript - .sh

$ bash /Users/Jonathan/Scripts/bash/MyScript.sh
MyScript - .sh
  • 2
    Not sure why this has so many downvotes - it's actually more efficient than the accepted answer. (As the latter, it also breaks with input filenames without an extension). Using an explicit path to basename is, perhaps, overkill. – mklement0 Dec 9 '14 at 16:35
0

Maybe there is an option in tar to do this; did you check the man? Otherwise, you can use Bash string expansion:

test="mpc-1.0.1.tar.gz"
noExt="${test/.tar.gz/}" # Remove the string '.tar.gz'
echo $noExt
  • cd $(tar tf $1 | sed -n 1p) – Brent Feb 14 '14 at 21:28
0

Here is a sed solution that extracts path components in a variety of forms and can handle most edge cases:

## Enter the input path and field separator character, for example:
## (separatorChar must not be present in inputPath)

inputPath="/path/to/Foo.bar"
separatorChar=":"

## sed extracts the path components and assigns them to output variables

oldIFS="$IFS"
IFS="$separatorChar"
read dirPathWithSlash dirPath fileNameWithExt fileName fileExtWithDot fileExt <<<"$(sed -En '
s/^[[:space:]]+//
s/[[:space:]]+$//
t l1
:l1
s/^([^/]|$)//
t
s/[/]+$//
t l2
:l2
s/^$/filesystem\/\
filesystem/p
t
h
s/^(.*)([/])([^/]+)$/\1\2\
\1\
\3/p
g
t l3
:l3
s/^.*[/]([^/]+)([.])([a-zA-Z0-9]+)$/\1\
\2\3\
\3/p
t
s/^.*[/](.+)$/\1/p
' <<<"$inputPath" | tr "\n" "$separatorChar")"
IFS="$oldIFS"

## Results (all use separatorChar=":")

## inputPath        = /path/to/Foo.bar
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = Foo.bar
## fileName         = Foo
## fileExtWithDot   = .bar
## fileExt          = bar

## inputPath        = /path/to/Foobar
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = Foobar
## fileName         = Foobar
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

## inputPath        = /path/to/...bar
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = ...bar
## fileName         = ..
## fileExtWithDot   = .bar
## fileExt          = bar

## inputPath        = /path/to/..bar
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = ..bar
## fileName         = .
## fileExtWithDot   = .bar
## fileExt          = bar

## inputPath        = /path/to/.bar
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = .bar
## fileName         = .bar
## fileExtWithDot   = 
## fileExt          = 

## inputPath        = /path/to/...
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = ...
## fileName         = ...
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

## inputPath        = /path/to/Foo.
## dirPathWithSlash = /path/to/
## dirPath          = /path/to 
## fileNameWithExt  = Foo.
## fileName         = Foo.
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

## inputPath        = / (the root directory)
## dirPathWithSlash = filesystem/
## dirPath          = filesystem
## fileNameWithExt  =
## fileName         =
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

## inputPath        =  (invalid because empty)
## dirPathWithSlash =
## dirPath          =
## fileNameWithExt  =
## fileName         =
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

## inputPath        = Foo/bar (invalid because doesn't start with a forward slash)
## dirPathWithSlash =
## dirPath          =
## fileNameWithExt  =
## fileName         =
## fileExtWithDot   =
## fileExt          =

Here's how it works:

sed parses the input path and prints the following path components in order on separate lines:

  • directory path with a trailing slash character
  • directory path without a trailing slash character
  • file name with extension
  • file name without extension
  • file extension with a leading dot character
  • file extension without a leading dot character

tr converts the sed output into a separator character-delimited string of the above path components.

read uses the separator character as the field separator (IFS="$separatorChar") and assigns each of the path components to its respective variable.

Here's how the sed construct works:

  • s/^[[:space:]]+// and s/[[:space:]]+$// strip any leading and/or trailing whitespace characters
  • t l1 and :l1 refreshes the t function for the next s function
  • s/^([^/]|$)// and t tests for an invalid input path (one that does not begin with a forward slash), in which case it leaves all output lines blank and quits the sed command
  • s/[/]+$// strips any trailing slashes
  • t l2 and :l2 refreshes the t function for the next s function
  • s/^$/filesystem/\[newline]filesystem/p and t tests for the special case where the input path consists of the root directory /, in which case it prints filesystem/ and filesystem for the dirPathWithSlash and dirPath output lines, leaves all other output lines blank, and quits the sed command
  • h saves the input path in the hold space
  • s/^(.*)([/])([^/]+)$/\1\2\[newline]\1\[newline]\3/p prints the dirPathWithSlash, dirPath, and fileNameWithExt output lines
  • g retrieves the input path from the hold space
  • t l3 and :l3 refreshes the t function for the next s function
  • s/^.*[/]([^/]+)([.])([a-zA-Z0-9]+)$/\1\[newline]\2\3\[newline]\3/p and t prints the fileName, fileExtWithDot, and fileExt output lines for the case where a file extension exists (assumed to consist of alphanumeric characters only), then quits the sed command
  • s/^.*[/](.+)$/\1/p prints the fileName but not the fileExtWithDot, and fileExt output lines for the case where a file extension does not exist, then quits the sed command
-1

You can also use a for loop and tr to extract the filename from the path...

for x in `echo $path | tr "/" " "`; do filename=$x; done

The tr replaces all / delimiters in path with spaces so making a list of strings, and the for loop scans through them leaving the last one in the filename variable.

  • 3
    If you're going to do it this way, save yourself some forks and instead use: (IFS=/ ; for x in $path; do filename=$x; done). The (...) subshell is needed to localize the assignment to IFS. – dubiousjim May 30 '12 at 21:44
-2

A simple bash one liner. I used this to remove rst extension from all files in pwd

for each in `ls -1 *.rst`
do
     a=$(echo $each | wc -c)
     echo $each | cut -c -$(( $a-5 )) >> blognames
done

What it does ?

1) ls -1 *.rst will list all the files on stdout in new line (try).

2) echo $each | wc -c counts the number of characters in each filename .

3) echo $each | cut -c -$(( $a-5 )) selects up to last 4 characters, i.e, .rst.

protected by Brad Larson Jul 26 '14 at 14:50

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