-1

This isn't legal:

public class MyBaseClass
{
  public MyBaseClass() {}
  public MyBaseClass(object arg) {}
}


public void ThisIsANoNo<T>() where T : MyBaseClass
{
  T foo = new T("whoops!");
}

In order to do this, you have to do some reflection on the type object for T or you have to use Activator.CreateInstance. Both are pretty nasty. Is there a better way?

1

You can't constrain T to have a particular constructor signature other than an empty constructor, but you can constrain T to have a factory method with the desired signature:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    protected MyBaseClass() {}
    protected abstract MyBaseClass CreateFromObject(object arg);
}

public void ThisWorksButIsntGreat<T>() where T : MyBaseClass, new()
{
    T foo = new T().CreateFromObject("whoopee!") as T;
}

However, I would suggest perhaps using a different creational pattern such as Abstract Factory for this scenario.

2

Nope. If you weren't passing in parameters, then you could constrain your type param to require a parameterless constructor. But, if you need to pass arguments you are out of luck.

0
where T : MyBaseClass, new()

only works w/ parameterless public constructor. beyond that, back to activator.CreateInstance (which really isn't THAT bad).

  • not in a generic way. – Darren Kopp Sep 18 '08 at 20:57
-2

I can see that not working.

But what is stopping you from doing this?

public void ThisIsANoNo<T>() where T : MyBaseClass
{
  MyBaseClass foo = new MyBaseClass("whoops!");
}

Since everything is going to inherit from MyBaseClass they will al be MyBaseClass, right?

I tried it and this works.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ThisIsANoNo<MyClass>();
            ThisIsANoNo<MyBaseClass>();
        }

        public class MyBaseClass
        {
            public MyBaseClass() { }
            public MyBaseClass(object arg) { }
        }

        public class MyClass :MyBaseClass
        {
            public MyClass() { }
            public MyClass(object arg, Object arg2) { }
        }

        public static void ThisIsANoNo<T>() where T : MyBaseClass
        {
            MyBaseClass foo = new MyBaseClass("whoops!");
        }
    }
}
  • What happens if you have a derived class that only has a constructor that takes 2 arguments? – Abe Heidebrecht Sep 18 '08 at 20:33
  • This method will never return objects of type T, only objects of type MyBaseClass. – Matt Howells Sep 18 '08 at 20:40
  • it's a void it's not returning anything. and a cast can fix that. – chrissie1 Sep 18 '08 at 20:47
  • @Abe I tried it and it works. – chrissie1 Sep 18 '08 at 20:53
  • T is an extension of MyBaseClass. You can new up an instance of MyBaseClass, but you cannot "up-cast" it to T, because it is not a T. In addition, your ThisIsANoNo implementation, while it has a generic signature, does not new up an instance of the type variable. – Will Sep 19 '08 at 13:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.