159
$all = array
(
    0 => 307,
    1 => 157,
    2 => 234,
    3 => 200,
    4 => 322,
    5 => 324
);
$search_this = array
(
    0 => 200,
    1 => 234
);

I would like to find out if $all contains all $search_this values and return true or false. Any ideas please?

2

6 Answers 6

320

The previous answers are all doing more work than they need to. Just use array_diff. This is the simplest way to do it:

$containsAllValues = !array_diff($search_this, $all);

That's all you have to do.

7
  • 1
    What about of using empty(array_diff($search_this, $all));?
    – Miguel
    May 6, 2021 at 8:34
  • ! operator on array will always return true. Use @Miguel 's suggestion: empty(array_diff($search_this, $all));
    – cquezel
    Jan 14, 2022 at 19:56
  • The original answer works because an empty array evaluates as false in PHP. Using empty() also works, but the ! operator does work fine.
    – orrd
    Jan 17, 2022 at 1:35
  • @Miguel an empty array in this context is treated as falsey, there is no need to use empty.
    – zanderwar
    Apr 8, 2022 at 13:17
  • This should actually be flipped, so it reads $containsAllValues = !array_diff($all, $search_this); ----- Example: $containsAllValues = !array_diff($all = ['a', 'b', 'c'], $search_this = ['c', 'c', 'c']); >> result false ----- Example: $containsAllValues = !array_diff($search_this = ['c', 'c', 'c'], $search_this = ['a', 'b', 'c']); >> Result true Jul 7, 2022 at 15:03
198

Look at array_intersect().

$containsSearch = count(array_intersect($search_this, $all)) === count($search_this);

Or for associative array, look at array_intersect_assoc().

Or for recursive compare of sub-arrays, try:

<?php

namespace App\helpers;

class Common {
    /**
     * Recursively checks whether $actual parameter includes $expected.
     *
     * @param array|mixed $expected Expected value pattern.
     * @param array|mixed $actual Real value.
     * @return bool
     */
    public static function intersectsDeep(&$expected, &$actual): bool {
        if (is_array($expected) && is_array($actual)) {
            foreach ($expected as $key => $value) {
                if (!static::intersectsDeep($value, $actual[$key])) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            return true;
        } elseif (is_array($expected) || is_array($actual)) {
            return false;
        }
        return (string) $expected == (string) $actual;
    }
}
5
  • 13
    You know you can omit both count() calls?
    – Wrikken
    Aug 15, 2013 at 16:01
  • 1
    @Wrikken Can't the values get reordered during array_intersect()? I mean, ['a', 'b'] != ['b', 'a']. Oct 16, 2013 at 18:57
  • 1
    @exizt: array_intersect() does not alter the input arrays, so $search_this & $all are safe (it just returns an output). The function signature is array array_intersect ( array $array1 , array $array2 [, array $... ] ) (safe). If it would/could alter them, it would be array array_intersect ( array &$array1 , array &$array2 [, array &$... ] ) (possible altering of input arguments). Also, the keys of $search_this are preserve, and the order of the first array is kept. So, both key/value pairs, as their order, match.
    – Wrikken
    Oct 16, 2013 at 21:03
  • 4
    And even then: array comparison: "== TRUE if $a and $b have the same key/value pairs.", so the order doesn't even matter (use === for that)
    – Wrikken
    Oct 16, 2013 at 21:24
  • 2
    This answer assumes that the $all array only contains unique values. If this is not the case, one may use the array_unique function on the $all array in the array_intersects function. Dec 12, 2013 at 21:49
15

A bit shorter with array_diff

$musthave = array('a','b');
$test1 = array('a','b','c');
$test2 = array('a','c');

$containsAllNeeded = 0 == count(array_diff($musthave, $test1));

// this is TRUE

$containsAllNeeded = 0 == count(array_diff($musthave, $test2));

// this is FALSE
5

I think you're looking for the intersect function

array array_intersect ( array $array1 , array $array2 [, array $ ... ] )

array_intersect() returns an array containing all values of array1 that are present in all the arguments. Note that keys are preserved.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.array-intersect.php

0
0

How about this:

function array_keys_exist($searchForKeys = array(), $searchableArray) {
    $searchableArrayKeys = array_keys($searchableArray);

    return count(array_intersect($searchForKeys, $searchableArrayKeys)) == count($searchForKeys); 
}
0

The other answers work with the given use case, however, you might get a false positive if you're checking "[] exists in $all". One way you can account for this edge case using array_diff() is like so:

function hasAllElems(array $arr1, array $arr2): bool
{
    if (empty($arr1) && ! empty($arr2)) {
        return false;
    }

    return ! array_diff($arr1, $arr2);
}

$searchThis = [0 => 200, 1 => 234];
$all = [0 => 307, 1 => 157, 2 => 234, 3 => 200, 4 => 322, 5 => 324];

var_dump(hasAllElems($searchThis, $all)); // true

var_dump(hasAllElems($all, $searchThis)); // false
var_dump(hasAllElems([], $all)); // false
var_dump(hasAllElems($searchThis, [])); // false

Here, by making an explicit check (i.e. if first array is empty and the second array is not empty), you can return false early in the code.

You can, of course, also use array_intersect() or a loop to achieve the same.

Wrote a blog post for those interested in learning more.

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