3

I'm trying to mimic the interpretation of the lang attribute similar to HTML or xml:lang.

Given the following XML chunk:

<xml lang="c">
    c#0
    <para>c#1</para>
    <para>c#2</para>
    <para lang="d">
        d#0
        <para>d#1</para>
        <para lang="c">c#3</para>
        <para lang="d">
            d#2
            <para>d#3</para>
            <para lang="c">c#4</para>
        </para>
        <para lang="c">
            c#5
            <para>c#6</para>
        </para>
    </para>
</xml>

I have problems to formulate an XPath 1.0 expression that returns all nodes that are of a specific language, let's say c. A node matches similar like the xpath lang() function would match for the xml:lang attribute:

  1. It has the attribute lang with the value c (//*[@lang = "c"])
  2. -OR-
    1. One of it's parent has the lang attribute with the value of c (//*[ancestor::*/@lang = "c"])
    2. -AND- the node itself has no lang attribute at all
    3. -AND NOT- if any of it's parent nodes have a lang attribute defined other than c more "near" than the parent with the lang attribute c (2.1 is "overruled").

Exemplary matches with the XML above and c for lang would give 7 nodes: c#0 to c#6.

<xml lang="c"> c#0 ...              (direct match, lang="c")
<para>c#1</para>                    (parent has lang="c")
<para>c#2</para>                    (parent has lang="c")
<para lang="c">c#3</para>           (direct match, lang="c")
<para lang="c">c#4</para>           (direct match, lang="c")
<para lang="c"> c#5 ...             (direct match, lang="c")
<para>c#6</para>                    (parent has lang="c", that parent is descending of 
                                     any other ancestor with lang="d")

I have a problem to describe this in an xpath query. Even I got better with xpath over the last year, this one really knocks me out.

Whatever I try, I have problems to describe the overruling nature of an ancestor with the matching predicate over an ancestor with a non-matching predicate.

The examples given are even only half of the problem, as there are not only full attribute value matches but also starting ones like:

 starts-with(@lang, concat("c", "-"))

But I would be glad to see the overruling problem solved first. I test with PHP (Online Demo):

<?php
header('Content-Type: text/plain');
$xml = <<<XML
<xml lang="c">
    c#0
    <para>c#1</para>
    <para>c#2</para>
    <para lang="d">
        d#0
        <para>d#1</para>
        <para lang="c">c#3</para>
        <para lang="d">
            d#2
            <para>d#3</para>
            <para lang="c">c#4</para>
        </para>
        <para lang="c">
            c#5
            <para>c#6</para>
        </para>
    </para>
</xml>
XML;

$doc = new DOMDocument();
$doc->loadXML($xml);
$xp = new DOMXPath($doc);

$expression = '
//*[
    ancestor-or-self::*/@lang = "c"
    and (
        not(ancestor-or-self::*/@lang != "c")
        or (
            count(ancestor-or-self::*[@lang != "c"])
            < count(ancestor-or-self::*[@lang = "c"])
        )
    )
]';

$result = $xp->query($expression);
printResult($result);

function printResult($result)
{
    global $xp;

    if ($result) {
        printf("Result (%d Nodes):\n", $result->length);
        foreach ($result as $index => $node) {
            $depth = $xp->evaluate('count(ancestor::*)', $node);
            printf("#%d (%d): %s\n", $index, $depth, $node->ownerDocument->saveXML($node));
        }
    } else {
        printf("No Result, query failed.\n");
    }
}
2
+100

Use:

//*[@lang='c'
  or
   not(@lang) and ancestor::*[@lang][1]/@lang = 'c'
   ]

This selects any element in the XML document that either has a lang attribute with value "c" or doesn't have a lang attribute and the value of the lang attribute of its first ancestor that has a lang attribute, is "c".

A simpler equivalent XPath expression:

//*[ancestor-or-self::*[@lang][1]/@lang='c']

Here is a snapshot of the selection, as performed with the XPath Visualizer:

enter image description here

  • Dude you are back! You finally found my question. I'm not ready to program right now, but I will check that after sleep. Thanks for joining by ;) – hakre Jul 4 '12 at 20:59
  • @hakre: It is my pleasure. Have a look at the updated answer with much shorter expression and how this looks like in the XPath Visualizer (Hint: A picture is worth thousand words -- and saves you programming) :) – Dimitre Novatchev Jul 4 '12 at 21:14
  • Ah, okay was just wondering about the [2] but you changed it. My head is too boozed I must admit to properly handle this right now. But I will check this out for sure. – hakre Jul 4 '12 at 21:24
  • @hakre: This is a bug in SO -- when I added the link for the XPath Visualizer, it "updated the link [1]" to "[2]". However, the picture clearly shows the original expression contains "[1]". – Dimitre Novatchev Jul 4 '12 at 21:26
  • Ah the SO page tries to re-number links probably. Well well, the QA team should do a better job ;) Thanks for posting and clarifying. – hakre Jul 4 '12 at 21:29
1

Your expected XPath

//*[(descendant-or-self::*/@lang = 'c' and not(descendant-or-self::*/@lang != 'c')) or (ancestor-or-self::*/@lang = 'c' and not(ancestor-or-self::*/@lang != 'c'))]

Output

xml     c#0 (lang: c)
para    c#1 (lang: c)
para    c#2 (lang: c)
para    c#3 (lang: c)
  • +1 That's a bit more elegant. – hakre Mar 11 '12 at 19:44
  • I have run now more tests and this does not work (like mine does not work as well). I've made the question more detailed and updated the XML chunk which better shows the issue. – hakre Mar 12 '12 at 2:24

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