109

I have a vector like: a = c(1:10) and I need to remove multiple values, like: 2, 3, 5

How to delete those numbers (they are NOT the positions in the vector) in the vector?

at the moment i loop the vector and do something like:

a[!a=NUMBER_TO_REMOVE]

But I think there is a function that does it automatically.

175

The %in% operator tells you which elements are among the numers to remove:

> a <- sample (1 : 10)
> remove <- c (2, 3, 5)
> a
 [1] 10  5  2  7  1  6  3  4  8  9
> a %in% remove
 [1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
> a [! a %in% remove]
 [1] 10  7  1  6  4  8  9

Note that this will silently remove incomparables (stuff like NA or Inf) as well (while it will keep duplicate values in a as long as they are not listed in remove).

  • If a can contain incomparables, but remove will not, we can use match, telling it to return 0 for non-matches and incomparables (%in% is a conventient shortcut for match):

    > a <- c (a, NA, Inf)
    > a
     [1]  10   5   2   7   1   6   3   4   8   9  NA Inf
    > match (a, remove, nomatch = 0L, incomparables = 0L)
     [1] 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
    > a [match (a, remove, nomatch = 0L, incomparables = 0L) == 0L]
    [1]  10   7   1   6   4   8   9  NA Inf
    

    incomparables = 0 is not needed as incomparables will anyways not match, but I'd include it for the sake of readability.
    This is, btw., what setdiff does internally (but without the unique to throw away duplicates in a which are not in remove).

  • If remove contains incomparables, you'll have to check for them individually, e.g.

    if (any (is.na (remove))) 
      a <- a [! is.na (a)]
    

    (This does not distinguish NA from NaN but the R manual anyways warns that one should not rely on having a difference between them)

    For Inf/ -Inf you'll have to check both sign and is.finite

  • setdiff is better, as it does everything in one operation, and references the amended vector only once. – Olexa Jan 26 at 9:22
  • 1
    @Olexa: set difference is not always the same as removing all occurences of a given set of numbers from a vector: it will remove duplicates in a that are not in remove as well. If that's not a problem, you can also use setdiff. setdiff, btw, uses match for which %in% is a shortcut. – cbeleites Jan 26 at 9:34
89

You can use setdiff.

Given

a <- sample(1:10)
remove <- c(2, 3, 5)

Then

> a
 [1] 10  8  9  1  3  4  6  7  2  5
> setdiff(a, remove)
[1] 10  8  9  1  4  6  7
  • 1
    very useful when a is the result of another function so you can do things in one line instead of 3 and a temp variable – jf328 Nov 6 '15 at 16:26
  • 9
    This will produce different results than the %in% solution if the input vector contains duplicates (in which case setdiff will only return the unique set, i.e. without duplicates) – docendo discimus Nov 5 '16 at 10:45
  • 1
    @docendodiscimus: fsetdiff of data.table package has an all flag (default F) that allows to keep duplicates in the input vector. – Juergen Jan 8 '18 at 9:45
7

You can do it as follows:

> x<-c(2, 4, 6, 9, 10) # the list
> y<-c(4, 9, 10) # values to be removed

> idx = which(x %in% y ) # Positions of the values of y in x
> idx
[1] 2 4 5
> x = x[-idx] # Remove those values using their position and "-" operator
> x
[1] 2 6

Shortly

> x = x[ - which(x %in% y)]
  • 1
    what you're calling a list in your example is a vector, right? – patrick Jul 4 '16 at 2:22
  • Yes I mean the vector. Thanks for the comment. – ykpemre Dec 26 '16 at 21:25
  • There is no need in which here. It's basically the same as @cbeleites answer. – David Arenburg Mar 26 '17 at 6:39
  • yes it is similar, but different in a few points of view. which returns indexes of TRUE values. So minus sign can be used to say "the indexes other than these indexes". Also which is more readable since it is closer to the natural language. – ykpemre Apr 10 '17 at 12:03
3

instead of

x <- x[! x %in% c(2,3,5)]

using the packages purrr and magrittr, you can do:

your_vector %<>% discard(~ .x %in% c(2,3,5))

this allows for subsetting using the vector name only once. And you can use it in pipes :)

  • can you please explain your last statement about variables name length? Why you don't like that? Why is better than the other way? Or, remove that paragraph since is not related to the main issue/question. – rodrigoap Oct 29 '16 at 14:31
2

First we can define a new operator,

"%ni%" = Negate( "%in%" )

Then, its like x not in remove

x <- 1:10
remove <- c(2,3,5)
x <- x[ x %ni% remove ]

or why to go for remove, go directly

x <- x[ x %ni% c(2,3,5)]
  • 3
    The question specifically says that 2, 3 and 5 are not positions in the vector. – blakeoft Jun 12 '15 at 12:15
1

UPDATE:

All of the above answers won't work for the repeated values, @BenBolker's answer using duplicated() predicate solves this:

full_vector[!full_vector %in% searched_vector | duplicated(full_vector)]

Original Answer: here I write a little function for this:

exclude_val<-function(full_vector,searched_vector){

      found=c()

      for(i in full_vector){  

        if(any(is.element(searched_vector,i))){
          searched_vector[(which(searched_vector==i))[1]]=NA
        }
        else{
          found=c(found,i)
        }
    }

    return(found)
}

so, let's say full_vector=c(1,2,3,4,1) and searched_vector=c(1,2,3).

exclude_val(full_vector,searched_vector) will return (4,1), however above answers will return just (4).

  • 1
    what about full_vector[!full_vector %in% searched_vector | duplicated(full_vector)] ? – Ben Bolker Apr 3 '15 at 11:56
  • @BenBolker ah I didn't know that "duplicated" predicate :(( now what, shall I delete my answer or change it to show only yours instead? – Özgür Apr 3 '15 at 12:11
  • 1
    You're welcome to edit your answer to include my comment. – Ben Bolker Apr 3 '15 at 12:46
  • @BenBolker, your solution is wrong; just try: full_vector = c(1,1,1,2,3); searched_vector = c(1,1,3); - that produces 1, 1, 2 instead of the correct answer 1, 2. – fnl Jun 13 '15 at 15:42
  • Just to add a possible, correct solution for repeated values: removeif <- function(from, where) { for (i in where) if (i %in% from) {from = from[-match(i, from)]}; from} – fnl Jun 13 '15 at 16:01
1
q <- c(1,1,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,5,5,7,7)
rm <- q[11]
remove(rm)
q
q[13] = NaN
q
q %in% 7

This sets the 13 in a vector to not a number(NAN) it shows false remove(q[c(11,12,13)]) if you try this you will see that remove function don't work on vector number. you remove entire vector but maybe not a single element.

  • 1
    Seems like a lot of work for something very simple. – Rich Scriven Mar 24 '17 at 22:43
1

There is also subset which might be useful sometimes:

a <- sample(1:10)
bad <- c(2, 3, 5)

> subset(a, !(a %in% bad))
[1]  9  7 10  6  8  1  4

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