25

I'm trying to replace text in a multi-line file using command-line perl. I'm using Ubuntu Natty.

Below is the content of my text file (called test.txt):

[mysqld]
#
# * Basic Settings
#

#
# * IMPORTANT
#   If you make changes to these settings and your system uses apparmor, you may
#   also need to also adjust /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld.
#

user            = mysql
socket          = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
port            = 3306
basedir         = /usr
datadir         = /var/lib/mysql
tmpdir          = /tmp
skip-external-locking

Below is my perl command:

perl -i -pe "s/(\[mysqld\][^\^]+)/\1\nsometext/g" test.txt

However, instead of replacing all the text in the file, below is what I end up with:

[mysqld]

sometext#
# * Basic Settings
#

#
# * IMPORTANT
#   If you make changes to these settings and your system uses apparmor, you may
#   also need to also adjust /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld.
#

user            = mysql
socket          = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
port            = 3306
basedir         = /usr
datadir         = /var/lib/mysql
tmpdir          = /tmp
skip-external-locking
#

I tried the Regex in RegexBuddy for Perl and it matches everything in the text file, but for some reason it's not working using perl on the command line.

I'd appreciate some assistance.

Thanks in advance.

2
  • 5
    I'm not sure what the expected result should be.
    – cornuz
    Mar 12, 2012 at 16:21
  • 1
    @cornuz I think that is evident from the question. I said "instead of replacing all the text in the file, [the following] is what I end up with..." so that pretty much explains it. Also from the regular expression I think it seems pretty clear what result I require.
    – ObiHill
    Mar 12, 2012 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

49

You are reading the file line-by-line, so only the first line matches your regex. What you'll want to do -- if you truly wish to delete most of the content -- is to slurp the file by using the -0 option, e.g. -0777. This is line ending processing, and 777 is just a number used by convention as an octal number large enough so as to cause file slurping.

perl -0777 -i -pe 's/(\[mysqld\][^\^]+)/$1\nsometext/g' test.txt

Also, I replaced your quotes. If you are in *nix, which it seems you are, single quotes are preferable. Case in point, $1 would not be interpolated by the shell.

5
  • Thank you so much. I had to modify it to this: perl -0777 -i -pe "s/(\[mysqld\][^\^]+)/\1\nsometext/g" test.txt because I'm going to need to use some shell variables later on. Cheers.
    – ObiHill
    Mar 12, 2012 at 18:17
  • Cheers. Do you know how I could include shell variables using single quotes?! In double-quotes I do something like this: perl -0777 -i -pe "s/(\[mysqld\][^\^]+)/\1\n$var/g" test.txt, it would be nice to know how I can achieve the same thing using single-quotes?! Thanks again.
    – ObiHill
    Mar 12, 2012 at 20:25
  • @ChuckUgwuh You can interpolate shell variables in a one-liner, yes. But if you use double quotes, that means variables intended to be perl variables will be interpolated as well, so it will be confusing. Why don't you try it out and see: perl -lwe "print $var"
    – TLP
    Mar 12, 2012 at 21:48
  • Thanks. I'll do that. It appears double-quotes work better for my specific circumstance so i'll stick with that for now until I figure out how to do it with single-quotes. Cheers.
    – ObiHill
    Mar 13, 2012 at 0:37
  • @ChuckUgwuh: Pass the variable into Perl's environment on the command line (one line): perlvar=$shellvar perl ... '...$ENV{"$perlvar"}...' or you can export it (may be on separate lines): export shellvar; perl ... '...$ENV{"shellvar"}...'. The former makes it available only to the environment of the single child process (and possibly its children), while the latter makes it available to any child process. Nov 28, 2012 at 21:45
7

The -p switch causes Perl to iterate over every line of the input and execute the given code for each of them (and to print the lines afterwards). Specifically, the command

perl -p -e 'SOME_CODE_HERE;'

is exactly equivalent to running the following Perl program:

LINE: while (<>) {
    SOME_CODE_HERE;
} continue {
    print or die "-p destination: $!\n";
}

Your regexp seems to be intended to match multiple lines at once, which obviously won't work if Perl is processing the input line by line. To make it work as intended, you have (at least) two options:

  1. Change Perl's notion of what constitutes a line by using the -0NNN switch. In particular, the switch -0777 causes Perl to treat every input file as a single "line".

  2. Rewrite your code to e.g. use the .. flip-flop operator.

By the way, I strongly suspect that your regexp doesn't mean what you think it means. In particular, [^\^]+ matches a string of one or more characters that doesn't contain a caret (^). Since your input doesn't seem likely to contain any carets, this seems essentially equivalent to (?s:.+) (or just .+ if you use the /s modifier).

0

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