I've been playing around with Python's subprocess module and I wanted to do an "interactive session" with bash from python. I want to be able to read bash output/write commands from Python just like I do on a terminal emulator. I guess a code example explains it better:

>>> proc = subprocess.Popen(['/bin/bash'])
>>> proc.communicate()
('user@machine:~/','')
>>> proc.communicate('ls\n')
('file1 file2 file3','')

(obviously, it doesn't work that way.) Is something like this possible, and how?

Thanks a lot

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try with this example:

import subprocess

proc = subprocess.Popen(['/bin/bash'], stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
stdout = proc.communicate('ls -lash')

print stdout

You have to read more about stdin, stdout and stderr. This looks like good lecture: http://www.doughellmann.com/PyMOTW/subprocess/

EDIT:

Another example:

>>> process = subprocess.Popen(['/bin/bash'], shell=False, stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
>>> process.stdin.write('echo it works!\n')
>>> process.stdout.readline()
'it works!\n'
>>> process.stdin.write('date\n')
>>> process.stdout.readline()
'wto, 13 mar 2012, 17:25:35 CET\n'
>>> 
  • 1
    The first .communicate() call works well, but if I try to communicate again, this happens: ValueError: I/O operation on closed file. Is there any way to keep it running? – justinas Mar 13 '12 at 14:07
  • Look at second example. – Adam Mar 13 '12 at 16:28
  • 1- the first code example can be written as stdout = subprocess.check_output(['ls', '-lash']). To run a bash command, you could check_output("some && command $(< file)", shell=True, executable='/bin/bash') 2- the second code example is very fragile -- if the input/output are not in sync.; deadlock may happen. 3- if stdin/stdout are not a tty; the program may change their output. See Q: Why not just use a pipe (popen())? – jfs Feb 4 '16 at 14:27
  • 1
    Your "another example" doesn't work in Python3.5. Any way to solve it? – waitingkuo Jul 9 '16 at 18:10
  • @waitingkuo that is because in Python 3 buffsize defaults to -1 and in 2 it is 0, so set it to 0 in Popen and it should work. For me it did. – UpmostScarab May 22 '17 at 7:01

pexpect is designed specifically for this kind of task. It's pure Python and it's inspired by expect, the venerable TCL tool.

  • Thanks, seems like a good tool, but is there any way to achieve this without pexpect? – justinas Mar 13 '12 at 14:10

An interactive bash process expects to be interacting with a tty. To create a pseudo-terminal, use os.openpty(). This will return a slave_fd file descriptor that you can use to open files for stdin, stdout, and stderr. You can then write to and read from master_fd to interact with your process. Note that if you're doing even mildly complex interaction, you'll also want to use the select module to make sure that you don't deadlock.

I wrote a module to facilitate the interaction between *nix shell and python.

def execute(cmd):
if not _DEBUG_MODE:
    ## Use bash; the default is sh
    print 'Output of command ' + cmd + ' :'
    subprocess.call(cmd, shell=True, executable='/bin/bash')
    print ''
else:
    print 'The command is ' + cmd
    print ''

Check out the whole stuff at github: https://github.com/jerryzhujian9/ez.py/blob/master/ez/easyshell.py

  • you now can install via pip: pip install ez – Jerry T May 22 '15 at 2:41

Use this example in my other answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/43012138/3555925

You can get more details in that answer.

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import os
import sys
import select
import termios
import tty
import pty
from subprocess import Popen

command = 'bash'
# command = 'docker run -it --rm centos /bin/bash'.split()

# save original tty setting then set it to raw mode
old_tty = termios.tcgetattr(sys.stdin)
tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())

# open pseudo-terminal to interact with subprocess
master_fd, slave_fd = pty.openpty()

# use os.setsid() make it run in a new process group, or bash job control will not be enabled
p = Popen(command,
          preexec_fn=os.setsid,
          stdin=slave_fd,
          stdout=slave_fd,
          stderr=slave_fd,
          universal_newlines=True)

while p.poll() is None:
    r, w, e = select.select([sys.stdin, master_fd], [], [])
    if sys.stdin in r:
        d = os.read(sys.stdin.fileno(), 10240)
        os.write(master_fd, d)
    elif master_fd in r:
        o = os.read(master_fd, 10240)
        if o:
            os.write(sys.stdout.fileno(), o)

# restore tty settings back
termios.tcsetattr(sys.stdin, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_tty)

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