Is it possible to read the following from the local variable in Lua?

local t = os.execute("echo 'test'")
print(t)

I just want to achieve this: whatever is executed via the ox.execute and will return any value, I would like to use it in Lua - for example echo 'test' will output test in the bash command line - is that possible to get the returned value (test in this case) to the Lua local variable?

  • 10
    It's Lua, not LUA. It's a proper name, not an acronym. – Nicol Bolas Mar 12 '12 at 23:17
  • @NicolBolas Oh, thank you my master! – Cyclone Mar 12 '12 at 23:17
  • @NicolBolas weeeeeelll.... ;) – Seth Carnegie Mar 12 '12 at 23:18
  • 5
    @Cyclone: Being rude to people trying to help you is not a good way to engender further help. – Kevin Ballard Mar 12 '12 at 23:19
  • 6
    @KevinBallard - I don't find his comment rude. Depends on your frame of mind at the time you read it. – Matt May 27 '13 at 0:01
up vote 58 down vote accepted

You can use io.popen() instead. This returns a file handle you can use to read the output of the command. Something like the following may work:

local handle = io.popen(command)
local result = handle:read("*a")
handle:close()

Note that this will include the trailing newline (if any) that the command emits.

  • Thank you :) I'll give it a try. – Cyclone Mar 12 '12 at 23:31
  • Getting this message: 'popen' not supported. – Cyclone Mar 13 '12 at 0:40
  • @Cyclone: According to the manual, "This function is system dependent and is not available on all platforms". What platform are you trying this on? The only workaround I can think of given the available functions is to use os.execute() but redirect standard output to a known temporary file, and then read the temporary file afterwards. – Kevin Ballard Mar 13 '12 at 0:41
  • I'm using FreeBSD 8.2. About your second suggestion - could you give me some example of how it should look like? And how about the performace? Its a lot of writing/reading. – Cyclone Mar 13 '12 at 2:48
  • 5
    @Cyclone: Something like os.execute(command .. " >/tmp/foo") (where /tmp/foo is replaced by an actual somewhat unique path, however you want to calculate it). – Kevin Ballard Mar 13 '12 at 3:16
function GetFiles(mask)
   local files = {}
   local tmpfile = '/tmp/stmp.txt'
   os.execute('ls -1 '..mask..' > '..tmpfile)
   local f = io.open(tmpfile)
   if not f then return files end  
   local k = 1
   for line in f:lines() do
      files[k] = line
      k = k + 1
   end
   f:close()
   return files
 end

Lua's os.capture returns all standard output, thus it will be returned into that variable.

Example:

local result = os.capture("echo hallo")
print(result)

Printing:

hallo

Sorry, but this is impossible. If the echo programm exit with success it will return 0. This returncode is what the os.execute() function get and returned too.

if  0 == os.execute("echo 'test'") then 
    local t = "test"
end

This is a way to get what you want, i hope it helps you.

Another Tip for getting the return code of a function is the Lua reference. Lua-Reference/Tutorial

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