10

The show function in Haskell doesn't seem to do what it should:

Prelude> let str = "stack\n\noverflow"
Prelude> putStrLn str
stack


overflow
Prelude> show str
"\"Stack\\n\\n\\noverflow\""
Prelude>

When I declare functions, I normally put the type signatures as Show, which doesn't deal with newlines correctly. I want it to treat \n as newlines, not literally "\n". When I change the type to String, the functions work fine. But I'd have to implement a seperate function for integers, floats, etc, etc.

For example, I may declare a function:

foo :: (Show x) => x -> IO ()
foo x = do
  putStrLn $ show x

... and call it this way:

foo "stack\n\noverflow"
foo 6
foo [1..]

How would I get the function to return what's expected? I.e. which function is similar to show but can return strings containing newlines?

5
  • 1
    Can you give us a specific use case of this? It would make understanding your intention easier.
    – Martijn
    Jun 9, 2009 at 9:58
  • You could just add a check to see if the input is a string, and just print it. Pattern matching is a very useful thing.
    – Rayne
    Jun 9, 2009 at 15:01
  • 2
    "show" is just like repr() in Python and inspect in Ruby, if you've used those languages before. Dec 12, 2011 at 20:55
  • The comparison to Python's repr is very apt, because show usually produces output which read could then parse and construct the original object from. It's not pretty-printing, it's serialization,
    – 9000
    Dec 2, 2015 at 16:31
  • There are many answers saying they do not understand the use case. Some variation of this comes up when serializing a data structure of mixed types with minimal constraints. Eg, wanting to convert some data structure to an XML file. You need to serialize each concrete value, which means converting to a string in some way. Show seems like an obvious constraint as it gives a means for ensuring a toString equivalent function can be applied. It's not so much that show has the wrong behaviour as there is no commonly / obviously applicable toString for assembling Strings into documents.
    – Adam Burke
    Nov 23, 2020 at 1:55

6 Answers 6

17

The contract of the show method in Haskell is that it produce a string that, when evaluated, yields the value that was shown.

Prelude> let str = "stack\n\noverflow"
Prelude> putStrLn str
stack

overflow
Prelude> putStrLn (show str)
"stack\n\noverflow"
Prelude> 
1
  • 3
    Just to add to this, the function you described is called "print" which is actually defined just as the above print x = putStrLn (show x)
    – Phyx
    Jun 8, 2010 at 18:01
9

Sounds like you're trying to simulate a ToString method, although some of your terminology is a little confusing.

You can simulate it like this:

{-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances, OverlappingInstances,
             FlexibleInstances, TypeSynonymInstances #-}

class ToString a where
    toString :: a -> String

instance ToString String where
    toString = id

instance Show a => ToString a where
    toString = show

However, as shown by the LANGUAGE pragmas, this is not very desirable. To really get a feel for what you're trying to do it would be easier if we had more context...

3

show shows the variable in the way that you entered it.

Seems pretty regular to me.

1

I'm not really sure the point in what your trying to do. It would help if you clarified a bit. Show is doing what it is supposed to do. Show simply produces a string containing what it was shown.

1

Porges' plan works and I think it brings out brings out what show is really up to, since the confusing behavior you found in ghci will still turn up if you get the IO function you want. Note that I added an instance for Char to Porges' code, since you would presumably want that not to have quotes.

{-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances, OverlappingInstances,
         FlexibleInstances, TypeSynonymInstances #-}
class ToString a where
  toString :: a -> String

instance ToString String where
  toString = id

instance ToString Char where
  toString x = [x]

instance Show a => ToString a where
  toString = show

foo :: (ToString a) => a -> IO ()
foo x = do {putStrLn $ toString x}

then, in ghci, watch what happens with foo.show:

*Main> let str =  "stack\n\noverflow"   
*Main> show str   
"\"stack\\n\\noverflow\""    
*Main> putStrLn str   
stack  

overflow  
*Main> putStrLn (show str)  
"stack\n\noverflow"  
*Main> foo str   
stack  

overflow  
*Main> foo (show str)  
"stack\n\noverflow"  
*Main> foo ( show (show str))  
"\"stack\\n\\noverflow\""  
*Main> let newl = "\n"  
*Main> foo newl  


*Main> putStrLn newl  


*Main> putStrLn (show newl)  
"\n"   



*Main> foo (show newl)  
"\n"  
*Main> foo (show (show newl))  
"\"\\n\""  
*Main> 
-1

"which function is similar to show but can return strings containing newlines?"

Answer: id

2
  • 1
    Are you just trying to be funny or did you just notr ead the question?
    – Jasper
    Dec 8, 2010 at 18:53
  • 1
    This is pretty old, but perhaps mattiast meant putStrLn $ id "stack\n\noverflow" which does answer the question.
    – stites
    Dec 2, 2015 at 16:07

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