3

I tried to use wmi to get the hard disk's serial number. What I did is this:

Start ipython and use this way to get serial num:

import wmi
c = wmi.WMI()
for x in c.Win32_PhysicalMedia():
    print x

The result is like this:

instance of Win32_PhysicalMedia
{
    SerialNumber = "2020202020202020202020205635514d385a5856";
    Tag = "\\\\.\\PHYSICALDRIVE0";
};

But my computer is win7, I start ipython with administrator privilege and do the same thing again, but now the result is different:

instance of Win32_PhysicalMedia
{
    SerialNumber = "            5VMQZ8VX";
    Tag = "\\\\.\\PHYSICALDRIVE0";
};

I guess the second result is more like a correct result. So can some one show me a correct way to get the serial number on windows, include XP, Vista, Win7, Win8?

I found that many people use CreateFileA and DeviceIoControl to get the serial number.

1
  • You didn't say which OS gives you the first result. – John Zwinck Mar 13 '12 at 12:06
3

If you Google "Win32_PhysicalMedia", the second hit is a bug report which now that I read everything more carefully looks like it describes exactly your problem (but offers no fix from what I see): http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/623282/win32-physicalmedia-returns-incorrect-serial-number-on-vista-or-higher-when-run-as-standard-user

So you may have to take matters into your own hands. This is what I wrote in this answer originally:

Look at those two strings:

2020202020202020202020205635514d385a5856
 5VMQZ8VX (yes there's a space in front)

Notice that the first appears to be a hexadecimal number. 0x20 is a space character. So the first one has many spaces followed by a few bytes of real data, which makes the two serial numbers comparable in size.

Now, use a Hex-to-ASCII converter like http://www.dolcevie.com/js/converter.html and punch in the first number. You get:

            V5QM8ZXV

See how similar that looks? The only difference now is byte ordering (endianness).

To settle this once and for all, you need to tell us which of the three you think is the "proper" representation of the serial number (ideally it will match what's printed on the drive). It will be simple enough to convert between the three representations once you figure out where you are (depends on the platform apparently--possibly on the version of Python, WMI, or the Python WMI module you're using).

3
  • Where does endianness come into this? – Deestan Mar 13 '12 at 12:32
  • 2
    The two different serial numbers in the OP can be converted to each other by hex-to-ascii, but it leaves the ASCII with alternating characters (bytes, hex pairs) swapped, which implies that the raw data gotten from the device is being treated as an array of 16-bit values, and as little-endian in one case and big-endian in the other. Or perhaps you have another explanation for the characters being swapped? – John Zwinck Mar 13 '12 at 12:51
  • Yeah, that's definitely endianness screw-up. Just didn't see what you were referring to at first. :) – Deestan Mar 13 '12 at 12:55
1

Better late than ever, i hope this help someone else. i took this from i don't know where.

import wmi

c = wmi.WMI()
hddSerialNumber = c.Win32_PhysicalMedia()[0].wmi_property('SerialNumber').value.strip()
print(hddSerialNumber)
0
>>> import binascii
>>> binascii.a2b_hex("2020202020202020202020205635514d385a5856")
'            V5QM8ZXV'

alternate characters are swapped... looks like they are probably the same serial number.

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