11

When you use the SQL Server TOP clause in a query, does the SQL Server engine stop searching for rows once it has enough to satisfy the TOP X needed to be returned?

Consider the following queries (assume some_text_field is unique and not set for full-text indexing):

SELECT
    pk_id
FROM
    some_table
WHERE
    some_text_field = 'some_value';

and

SELECT TOP 1
    pk_id
FROM
    some_table
WHERE
    some_text_field = 'some_value';

The first query would need to search the entire table and return all of the results it found. The way we have it setup though, that query would ever really return one value. So, would using TOP 1 prevent SQL server from scanning the rest of the table once it has found a match?

5
  • 1
    Yes, it stops after first match.
    – MicSim
    Mar 13 '12 at 16:59
  • 7
    If you use TOP x without providing an ORDER BY the results are going to be random and non predictable. As such: since you should provide an ORDER BY for the query to make any sense, you will need to have an appropriate index in place for the query processor to be able to fetch the first n rows in order and stop after that - otherwise the whole table needs to be scanned and sorted.
    – marc_s
    Mar 13 '12 at 17:01
  • @marc_s Your comment is the best answer. : ) Mar 13 '12 at 17:03
  • 1
    TBH I hadn't read the whole blurb before submitting my answer so at the moment it doesn't address your specific case. Why doesn't some_text_field have a unique index defined on it? And without this how can you be sure it is unique anyway? Mar 13 '12 at 17:16
  • i am working on an older system, and things like indexes haven't been implemented yet. we are defining what needs to be done for stuff like this still. Mar 13 '12 at 17:20
8

Yes, the query stops once it has found enough rows, and doesn't query the rest of the table(s).

Note however that you would probably want to have an index that the database can use for the query. In that case there isn't really any performance difference between getting the first match and getting all one matches.

1
  • Martin Smith's answer is a good one, but this one is a bit more relevant to my needs. i'm working on older/legacy software, and nobody has gone through and made hardly any indexes, so we are doing stuff like this which ends up performing whole table scans just to find one row worth of data... Mar 22 '12 at 17:01
5

Yes.

In this case you would get 1 undefined row (as TOP without ORDER BY doesn't guarantee any particular result) then it would stop processing (The TOP iterator in the plan won't request any more rows from child iterators).

If there is a blocking operator (such as SORT) in the plan before the TOP operator or parallel operators before the TOP it may end up doing a lot of work for rows not returned in the final result anyway though.

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