I have installed an application, when I try to run it (it's an executable jar) nothing happens. When I run it from the commandline with:

java -jar "app.jar"

I get the following message:

no main manifest attribute, in "app.jar"

Normally, if I had created the program myself, I would have added a main class attribute to the manifest file. But in this case, since the file is from an application, i cannot do that. I also tried extracting the jar to see if I could find the main class, but there are to many classes and none of them has the word "main" in it's name. There must be a way to fix this because the program runs fine on other systems.

  • Look for main methods; you can't rely on class names. – Dave Newton Mar 13 '12 at 18:22
  • 2
    I know, but since I only have .class files I can't really see the methods. Or can I? – Ewoud Mar 13 '12 at 18:42
  • You aren't really typing the quotes, are you? In any case, there are a number of ways to see methods, include using javap. You might want to un-jar it and look to see if there's actually no manifest, though. – Dave Newton Mar 13 '12 at 19:37
  • Related: with dependencies: stackoverflow.com/a/23986765/360211 – weston Sep 13 '15 at 7:37
  • what if I don't have main class as I am running the code using CommandLineJobRunner – Kamini Jun 2 '17 at 14:01

32 Answers 32

First, it's kind of weird, to see you run java -jar "app" and not java -jar app.jar

Second, to make a jar executable... you need to jar a file called META-INF/MANIFEST.MF

the file itself should have (at least) this one liner:

Main-Class: com.mypackage.MyClass

Where com.mypackage.MyClass is the class holding the public static void main(String[] args) entry point.

Note that there are several ways to get this done either with the CLI, Maven, Ant or Gradle:

For CLI, the following command will do: (tks @dvvrt) jar cmvf META-INF/MANIFEST.MF <new-jar-filename>.jar <files to include>

For Maven, something like the following snippet should do the trick. Note that this is only the plugin definition, not the full pom.xml:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <!-- Build an executable JAR -->
      <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
      <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
      <version>3.1.0</version>
      <configuration>
        <archive>
          <manifest>
            <addClasspath>true</addClasspath>
            <classpathPrefix>lib/</classpathPrefix>
            <mainClass>com.mypackage.MyClass</mainClass>
          </manifest>
        </archive>
      </configuration>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

(Pick a <version> appropriate to your project.)

For Ant, the snippet below should help:

<jar destfile="build/main/checksites.jar">
  <fileset dir="build/main/classes"/>
  <zipfileset includes="**/*.class" src="lib/main/some.jar"/>
  <manifest>
    <attribute name="Main-Class" value="com.acme.checksites.Main"/>
  </manifest>
</jar>

Credits Michael Niemand -

For Gradle:

plugins {
    id 'java'
}

jar {
    manifest {
        attributes(
                'Main-Class': 'com.mypackage.MyClass'
        )
    }
}
  • 13
    In Ant its <manifest><attribute name="Main-Class" value="com.mypackage.MyClass"/></manifest> within the <jar> element – Michael Niemand Feb 15 '13 at 10:08
  • 1
    Thank you. Just wanted to add that you can copy dependencies to the lib folder using this: stackoverflow.com/a/996915/1121497. Since the classpath includes that lib folder then you only need to execute the jar with java -jar myproject.jar and it will find the dependencies. – Ferran Maylinch May 31 '14 at 9:56
  • 2
    HOW TO "jar a file called META-INF/MANIFEST.MF" ? I have a .jar on one hand and a .MF on the other, how do I link them together ? I put the manifest in the same folder as the .jar but it doesn't work I still got the problem ! – Wicelo Sep 2 '14 at 13:02
  • I think that's a different question - but a jar is actually a zip. Just use your best zip tool to add the file in the right location. – Olivier Refalo Sep 4 '14 at 3:06
  • 4
    @Wicelo To specify a specific MANIFEST.MF file while creating a jar file use the m flag for jar. eg. jar cmvf META-INF/MANIFEST.MF <new-jar-filename>.jar <files to include> – dvvrt Sep 23 '14 at 20:23

That should have been java -jar app.jar instead of java -jar "app".

The -jar option only works if the JAR file is an executable JAR file, which means it must have a manifest file with a Main-Class attribute in it. See Packaging Programs in JAR Files to learn how to create an executable JAR.

If it's not an executable JAR, then you'll need to run the program with something like:

java -cp app.jar com.somepackage.SomeClass

where com.somepackage.SomeClass is the class that contains the main method to run the program. (What that class is depends on the program, it's impossible to tell from the information you've supplied).

  • 3
    thanks for your reply, but your solution only works if I know the name of the class that contains the main method. And it was a typo... It was supposed to be "app.jar". But how do you explain why it runs on other systems by just double clicking the file? – Ewoud Mar 13 '12 at 18:45
  • If it is indeed an executable JAR, you can extract the manifest file (it's in the META-INF directory inside the JAR file). It should contain a Main-Class attribute that gives you the name of the main class. – Jesper Mar 14 '12 at 6:21
  • If it doesn run on one system, then that system maybe has a too old Java version. If the JAR is for example compiled with Java 7, then you can't run it on a system that has Java 6 or older. – Jesper Mar 14 '12 at 6:23
  • That's funny since the other system is running win7 and this pc with the problems runs win8. – Ewoud Mar 15 '12 at 17:42
  • 1
    @Jesper Hello, what if eclipse is using the default package? Do I just put the class name? – Ogen Jul 18 '14 at 5:08

Alternatively, you can use maven-assembly-plugin, as shown in the below example:

<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-assembly-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
      <execution>
        <phase>package</phase>
        <goals>
          <goal>single</goal>
        </goals>
      </execution>
    </executions>
    <configuration>
      <archive>
        <manifest>
          <addClasspath>true</addClasspath>
          <mainClass>com.package.MainClass</mainClass>
        </manifest>
      </archive>
      <descriptorRefs>
        <descriptorRef>jar-with-dependencies</descriptorRef>
      </descriptorRefs>
    </configuration>
  </plugin> 

In this example all the dependency jars as specified in section will be automatically included in your single jar. Note that jar-with-dependencies should be literally put as, not to be replaced with the jar file names you want to include.

That is because Java cannot find the Main attribute in the MANIFEST.MF file. The Main attribute is necessary to tell java which class it should use as the application's entry point. Inside the jar file, the MANIFEST.MF file is located in META-INF folder. Wondering how you could look at what's inside a jar file? Open the jar file with WinRAR.

The main attribute inside the MANIFEST.MF looks like this:

Main-Class: <packagename>.<classname>

You get this "no main manifest attribute" error when this line is missing from the MANIFEST.MF file.

It's really a huge mess to specify this attribute inside the MANIFEST.MF file.

Update: I just found a really neat way to specify the Application's entry point in eclipse. When you say Export,

Select Jar and next 

[ give it a name in the next window ] and next

and next again

and you'll see " Select the class of the application entry point".

Just pick a class and Eclipse will automatically build a cool MANIFEST.MF for you.

enter image description here

The Gradle answer is to add a jar/manifest/attributes setting like this:

apply plugin: 'java'

jar {
    manifest {
        attributes 'Main-Class': 'com.package.app.Class'
    }
}
  • 1
    the simplest answer thus far. – lasec0203 Oct 21 '17 at 0:28

Try this command to include the jar:

java -cp yourJarName.jar your.package..your.MainClass
  • 1
    One way is to include main class in pom.xml and use java -jar command, other one is to use java -cp command. – Gaurav Khare May 10 '16 at 10:56

For maven, this is what solved it (for me, for a Veetle codebase on GitHub):

<build>
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-shade-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.0</version>
    <executions>
      <execution>
        <phase>package</phase>
        <goals>
          <goal>shade</goal>
        </goals>
        <configuration>
          <transformers>
            <transformer implementation="org.apache.maven.plugins.shade.resource.ManifestResourceTransformer">
              <mainClass>org.lazydevs.veetle.api.VeetleAPI</mainClass>
            </transformer>
          </transformers>
        </configuration>
      </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>
 </plugins>
</build>

Cheers...

  • Only this method works, rest answers are useless – Ashish Doneriya Apr 27 '17 at 13:03
  • I found this worked but I had to execute as mvn package shade:shade just running mvn package didn't trigger the shade plugin to run. – Raystorm Nov 27 '17 at 17:56

I had this issue when creating a jar using IntelliJ IDEA. See this discussion.

What solved it for me was to re-create the jar artifact, choosing JAR > From modules with dependencies, but not accepting the default Directory for META-INF/MANIFEST.MF. Change it from -/src/main/java to -/src/main/resources.

Otherwise it was including a manifest file in the jar, but not the one in -/src/main/java that it should have.

  • This worked for me with IDEA 14.1.6. I also added the build property for pom.xml but it had no effect. But your answer solved it, thank you. – lsrom Oct 30 '16 at 22:34
  • Link does not works. – Rahul Chauhan Oct 13 at 10:59
  • Thanks for saving my desktop from getting dented by the pure frustration of nothing else working ;) Your link seems broken, but I can confirm that this works perfectly. Tested with IntelliJ IDEA 2018.2.5 (Community Edition) – Matthias Bö Nov 12 at 13:42

For me, none of the answers really helped - I had the manifest file in correct place, containing the Main-Class and everything. What tripped me over was this:

Warning: The text file from which you are creating the manifest must end with a new line or carriage return. The last line will not be parsed properly if it does not end with a new line or carriage return.

(source). Adding a newline at the end of the manifest fixed it.

If using Maven, include following in the pom

<parent>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
    <version>1.4.2.RELEASE</version>
</parent>

<properties>
    <java.version>1.8</java.version>
</properties>

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>
  • 3
    Who said this was a Spring Boot project? – james.garriss Sep 12 '17 at 11:46
  • @james.garriss well I would say, I came to this post searching for no main manifest attribute error but I am working on spring boot application so this answer helped me. I already knew how to create META-INF/MANIFEST.MF file, but not how to make spring-boot automatically handles it. – Vishrant Jan 17 at 4:20
  • 2
    I don't see any reason for downvoting this answer. If you are not using spring-boot just ignore it. Stackoverflow also helps to build your own issue repository which you face while programming. – Vishrant Jan 17 at 4:21
  • @Vishrant I don't know about others but I downvoted because this answer does not address the question as it was posed. It may have just happened to answer your question, but your question wasn't really what was asked. – Bane Mar 5 at 22:40
  • @Bane sure. but the question can be taken in a broad sense and this answer applies to it and can help others in the sense when they will use spring boot. – Vishrant Mar 6 at 2:10

I got same error just now. If u're using gradle, just add next one in ur gradle.build:

apply plugin: 'java'

jar {
    manifest {
        attributes 'Main-Class': 'com.company.project.MainClass'
    }
}

Where com.company.project.MainClass path to ur class with public static void main(String[] args) method.

  • This helped me! gradle tutorials had specified using the top-level mainClassName variable set, but that only helps with gradle run command, not with creating an executable .jar – kevlarr Dec 11 '17 at 3:37
  • Already answered stackoverflow.com/a/37127374/1224741 – QED Dec 22 '17 at 11:53

I had the same issue. by adding following lines to pom file made it work. The plugin will make sure the build process of your application with all necessary steps.

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>
  • worked perfectly, but consider adding the version as of April 2018 <plugin> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.0.1.RELEASE</version> </plugin> – Tenflex Apr 16 at 17:32
  • Sorry but it's not a solution because he is not talking about Spring Boot, it's general problem with jar execution :) – LAMRIN TAWSRAS Jul 16 at 12:59
  • Thanks this worked for me – hemantgp Nov 5 at 20:06

If the jar isn't following the rules, it's not an executable jar.

I faced the same issue and it's fixed now:) Just follow the below steps and the error could be for anything, but the below steps makes the process smoother. I spend lot of time to find the fix.

1.Try restart the Eclipse (if you are using Eclipse to built JAR file) --> Actually this helped my issue in exporting the JAR file properly.

2.After eclipse restart, try to see if your eclipse is able to recognize the main class/method by your Java project --> right click --> Run as --> Run configurations --> Main --> click Search button to see if your eclipse is able to lookup for your main class in the JAR file. --> This is for the validation that JAR file will have the entry point to the main class.

  1. After this, export your Java Dynamic project as "Runnable JAR" file and not JAR file.

  2. In Java launch configuration, choose your main class.

  3. Once export the jar file, use the below command to execute. java -cp [Your JAR].jar [complete package].MainClass eg: java -cp AppleTCRuleAudit.jar com.apple.tcruleaudit.classes.TCRuleAudit

  4. You might face the unsupported java version error. the fix is to change the java_home in your shell bash profile to match the java version used to compile the project in eclipse.

Hope this helps! Kindly let me know if you still have any issues.

I had the same issue today. My problem was solved my moving META-INF to the resources folder.

Any executable jar file Should run either by clicking or running using command prompt like java -jar app.jar (use "if path of jar contains space" - i.e. java -jar "C:\folder name\app.jar"). If your executable jar is not running, which means it is not created properly.

For better understanding, extract the jar file (or view using any tool, for windows 7-Zip is nice one) and check the file under /META-INF/MANIFEST.MF. If you find any entry like

Main-Class: your.package.name.ClaaswithMain - then it's fine, otherwise you have to provide it.

Be aware of appending Main-Class entry on MANIFEST.MF file, check where you are saving it!

You Can Simply follow this step Create a jar file using

 jar -cfm jarfile-name manifest-filename Class-file name

While running the jar file simple run like this

 java -cp jarfile-name main-classname

You might not have created the jar file properly:

ex: missing option m in jar creation

The following works:

jar -cvfm MyJar.jar Manifest.txt *.class

For me this error occurred simply because I forgot tell Eclipse that I wanted a runnable jar file and not a simple library jar file. So when you create the jar file in Eclipse make sure that you click the right radio button

I had the same problem. A lot of the solutions mentioned here didn't give me the whole picture, so I'll try to give you a summary of how to pack jar files from the command line.

  1. If you want to have your .class files in packages, add the package in the beginning of the .java.

    Test.java

    package testpackage;
    
    public class Test
    {
        ...
    }
    
  2. To compile your code with your .class files ending up with the structure given by the package name use:

    javac -d . Test.java
    

    The -d . makes the compiler create the directory structure you want.

  3. When packaging the .jar file, you need to instruct the jar routine on how to pack it. Here we use the option set cvfeP. This is to keep the package structure (option P), specify the entry point so that the manifest file contains meaningful information (option e). Option f lets you specify the file name, option c creates an archive and option v sets the output to verbose. The important things to note here are P and e.

    Then comes the name of the jar we want test.jar.

    Then comes the entry point .

    And then comes -C . <packagename>/ to get the class files from that folder, preserving the folder structure.

    jar cvfeP test.jar testpackage.Test -C . testpackage/
    
  4. Check your .jar file in a zip program. It should have the following structure

    test.jar

    META-INF
    | MANIFEST.MF
    testpackage
    | Test.class
    

    The MANIFEST.MF should contain the following

    Manifest-Version: 1.0
    Created-By: <JDK Version> (Oracle Corporation)
    Main-Class: testpackage.Test
    

    If you edit your manifest by hand be sure to keep the newline at the end otherwise java doesn't recognize it.

  5. Execute your .jar file with

    java -jar test.jar
    
  • 1
    The 4th step of your answer is very important ! My manifest wasn't working because of that newline at the end I did not know I had to put. All answers I visited on this topic (a lot) did not mention this, and it is mandatory for anyone not using maven,ant,gradle, and so on. – Maude Aug 21 at 18:26
  • 1
    @Maude thank you for the feedback. That's precisely why I added the answer with the newline hint in bold. I looked for days until I found this out by comparing with an auto-generated manifest. – CodeMonkey Aug 22 at 15:05

Since you've add MANIFEST.MF, I think you should consider the order of Field in this file. My env is java version "1.8.0_91"

and my MANIFEST.MF as here

// MANIFEST.MF
Manifest-Version: 1.0
Created-By: 1.8.0_91 (Oracle Corporation)
Main-Class: HelloWorldSwing

// run
~ java -jar HelloWorldSwing.jar
no main manifest attribute, in HelloWorldSwing.jar

However, this as below run through

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Main-Class: HelloWorldSwing
Created-By: 1.8.0_91 (Oracle Corporation)

//this run swing normally
  • Eh? The order is immaterial. Unclear what you're claiming. – user207421 Mar 6 at 2:19

(first post - so it may not be clean)

This is my fix for OS X 11.6, Maven-based Netbeans 8.2 program. Up to now my app is 100% Netbeans - no tweaking (just a few shell escapes for the impossible!).

Having tried most all of the answers here and elsewhere to no avail, I returned to the art of "use what works".

The top answer here (olivier-refalo thanx) looked like the right place to start but didn't help.

Looking at other projects which did work, I noticed some minor differences in the manifest lines:

  1. addClasspath, classpathPrefix were absent (deleted them)
  2. mainClass was missing the "com." (used the NB -> Project Properties->Run->Main Class->Browse to specify)

Not sure why (I am only 3 months into java) or how, but can only say this worked.

Here is just the modified manifest block used:

    <manifest>
        <mainClass>mypackage.MyClass</mainClass>
    </manifest>

I personally think all the answers here are mis-understanding the question. The answer to this lies in the difference of how spring-boot builds the .jar. Everyone knows that Spring Boot sets up a manifest like this, which varies from everyones asssumption that this is a standard .jar launch, which it may or may not be :

Start-Class: com.myco.eventlogging.MyService
Spring-Boot-Classes: BOOT-INF/classes/
Spring-Boot-Lib: BOOT-INF/lib/
Spring-Boot-Version: 1.4.0.RELEASE
Created-By: Apache Maven 3.3.9
Build-Jdk: 1.8.0_131
Main-Class: org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher

Perhaps it needs to executed with org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher on the classpath?

  • This sounds promising. How exactly do you add JarLauncher to the classpath? – MarkHu Feb 3 at 6:01

I found a new solution to bad manifest generation !

  1. Open the jar file with a zip editor like WinRAR
  2. Click on for META-INF

  3. Add or edit

    • Add:

      • Create a text file called MANIFEST.MF in a folder called META-INF and add the following line:

        • Manifest-Version: 1.0
        • Main-Class: package.ex.com.views.mainClassName
      • Save the file and add it to the zip

    • Edit:

      • Drag the file out modify the MANIFEST.MF to add the previous line
  4. Open cmd and type: java -jar c:/path/JarName.jar

It should work fine now !

The above answers were only partly helpful for me. java -cp was part of the answer, but I needed more specific info on how to identify the class to run. Here is what worked for me:

Step 1: find the class I need to run

jar tf /path/to/myjar.jar | more

The top lines of the result were:

META-INF/
META-INF/MANIFEST.MF
somepath/
somepath/App.class
META-INF/maven/
...

App.class contained the main class to run. I'm not 100% sure if you can always assume the class you need is the first one, but it was for me. If it isn't, I'd imagine it isn't too hard to use grep to exclude library-related results to pare the class list down to a manageable size.

From there it was easy: I just use that path (minus the ".class" suffix):

java -cp /path/to/myjar.jar somepath/App
  • It isn't always the first class. Hardly ever. Command line should be java -cp ... somepackage.App. – user207421 Mar 6 at 2:16

I had this problem and i solved it recently by doing this in Netbeans 8 (Refer to the image below):

Netbeans project properties

  1. go to properties of your project.
  2. click on Run.
  3. specify the main class of your project using browse.
  4. build and run the Jar file.

You might have the same problem as I do. After creating your .jar file, write jar xf app.jar META-INF/MANIFEST.MF. This will create a copy of the file to your current directory so you can read it. If it only says something like:

Manifest-Version: 1.0

Created-By: 1.8.0_51 (Oracle Corporation)

and does not contain the "Main-Class" declaration, then I think you found your problem.

I do not know how to solve it, though. I checked other people with same/similar problems on StackOverflow and couldn't find an answer. However with this information you can perhaps get some better help (given the fact that you have the same problem as I).

Edit: I had tried with a manifest-file but didn't get it to work, but my mistake was to only name one of the classes when creating the jar-file. I wrote *.class instead and it works now.

Although I don't know why there is a need to create a manifest-file. But I guess it's fine as long as it works.

If you are using the command line to assemble .jar it is possible to point to the main without adding Manifest file. Example:

jar cfve app.jar TheNameOfClassWithMainMethod *.class

(param "e" does that: TheNameOfClassWithMainMethod is a name of the class with the method main() and app.jar - name of executable .jar and *.class - just all classes files to assemble)

check your jar file inside MANIFEST.MF Main-Class is available or not

first.java

class first
{
        public static void main (String arg[ ])
        {
           System.out.println("Welcome to the world of Java");
        }
}

Before:

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Created-By: 1.7.0_80 (Oracle Corporation)

sony@sony-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents$ java -jar first.jar
no main manifest attribute, in first.jar

After:

Manifest-Version: 1.0
Created-By: 1.7.0_80 (Oracle Corporation)
Main-Class: first

sony@sony-VPCEH25EN:~/Documents$ java -jar first.jar 
Welcome to the world of Java

I had a similar issue as you, in below a syntax to create successfully .war File:-

jar {cvf} [jar-file] [manifest-file]

manifest When creating (c) or updating (u) a JAR file, the manifest operand defines the preexisting manifest files with names and values of attributes to be included in MANIFEST.MF in the JAR file. The manifest operand must be specified if the f option is present '[1]'.

In order to create manifest file you need to defined a value for some attributes, you could put asterisk after the (.WAR) file name to avoid creating manifest file:-

jar -cvf foo.war *

To be honest with you I don't know if that is a best practice but it do the work for me :).

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.