544

I'm getting a datetime string in a format like "2009-05-28T16:15:00" (this is ISO 8601, I believe). One hackish option seems to be to parse the string using time.strptime and passing the first six elements of the tuple into the datetime constructor, like:

datetime.datetime(*time.strptime("2007-03-04T21:08:12", "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S")[:6])

I haven't been able to find a "cleaner" way of doing this. Is there one?

1
  • 23
    It's worth bearing in mind that this isn't quite a duplicate of the issue it's been closed against. The linked issue refers specifically to RFC 3339 strings, while this one refers to ISO 8601 strings. The RFC 3339 syntax is a subset of the ISO 8601 syntax (defined in the non-free ISO 8601 standard which, like most ISO standards, you must either pirate or pay a huge fee to read). The datetime string exhibited in this question is an ISO 8601 datetime, but NOT an RFC 3339 datetime. UTC offsets are mandatory in RFC 3339 datetimes, and none is provided here.
    – Mark Amery
    Jun 7, 2015 at 16:20

11 Answers 11

856

I prefer using the dateutil library for timezone handling and generally solid date parsing. If you were to get an ISO 8601 string like: 2010-05-08T23:41:54.000Z you'd have a fun time parsing that with strptime, especially if you didn't know up front whether or not the timezone was included. pyiso8601 has a couple of issues (check their tracker) that I ran into during my usage and it hasn't been updated in a few years. dateutil, by contrast, has been active and worked for me:

from dateutil import parser
yourdate = parser.parse(datestring)
11
  • 5
    right, pyiso8601 has some very subtle issues which you might notice when it's already spread over the entire code. dateutil.parser is really good, but one should keep an eye of enforcing tz-awareness manually if necessary.
    – Daniel F
    Sep 22, 2013 at 9:09
  • 5
    An update to pyiso8601 in early Feb 2014 has resolved many issues. It handles a much broader set of valid ISO8601 strings. It is worth another look.
    – Dave Hein
    Nov 13, 2014 at 0:46
  • 5
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the Z in the time example you include specifically indicate a UTC time?
    – dicroce
    Aug 28, 2016 at 18:30
  • 139
    As from python 3.7 you can use datetime.datetime.fromisoformat docs.python.org/3/library/… Sep 17, 2018 at 14:15
  • 54
    @YuriRitvin: The official documentation from the link you gave reads the following caution: This does not support parsing arbitrary ISO 8601 strings - it is only intended as the inverse operation of datetime.isoformat(). A more full-featured ISO 8601 parser, dateutil.parser.isoparse is available in the third-party package dateutil. So yeah, even for Python 3.7 we are back to the dateutil package.
    – Voicu
    Oct 3, 2019 at 16:52
207

Since Python 3.7 and no external libraries, you can use the fromisoformat function from the datetime module:

datetime.datetime.fromisoformat('2019-01-04T16:41:24+0200')

Python 2 doesn't support the %z format specifier, so it's best to explicitly use Zulu time everywhere if possible:

datetime.datetime.strptime("2007-03-04T21:08:12Z", "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ")
10
  • 3
    Perhaps you were looking the datetime module level functions, instead of the datetime.datetime class methods.
    – tzot
    Jun 11, 2009 at 0:26
  • 36
    You gotta agree though that this contradicts python ideology, being rather unobvious... strptime? Couldn't they use a meaningful name rather than propagate an old crappy C name?... Jan 18, 2010 at 1:00
  • 9
    Note that this parses a subset of ISO 8601. If you tell your client that you can parse all 8601 datetimes, they may send you one without dashes, without colons, with a weeknumer instead of a month, etc.
    – Peter
    Oct 2, 2013 at 16:08
  • 3
    Downvoted because the question specifically say ISO-8601, while avoiding explicit string format. I am specifically trying to find an answer without having to how explicit string format. Also Python's str(datetime) and JavaScript's Date.toISOString() is a little different.
    – Polv
    Jul 21, 2019 at 8:13
  • 4
    Since Python 3.7 there this class method in the standard library: datetime.datetime.fromisoformat(date_string). See docs.python.org/3/library/… stackoverflow.com/a/49784038/320437 Jun 7, 2021 at 14:07
65

Because ISO 8601 allows many variations of optional colons and dashes being present, basically CCYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss[Z|(+|-)hh:mm]. If you want to use strptime, you need to strip out those variations first.

The goal is to generate a UTC datetime object.


If you just want a basic case that work for UTC with the Z suffix like 2016-06-29T19:36:29.3453Z:

datetime.datetime.strptime(timestamp.translate(None, ':-'), "%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%fZ")

If you want to handle timezone offsets like 2016-06-29T19:36:29.3453-0400 or 2008-09-03T20:56:35.450686+05:00 use the following. These will convert all variations into something without variable delimiters like 20080903T205635.450686+0500 making it more consistent/easier to parse.

import re
# This regex removes all colons and all
# dashes EXCEPT for the dash indicating + or - utc offset for the timezone
conformed_timestamp = re.sub(r"[:]|([-](?!((\d{2}[:]\d{2})|(\d{4}))$))", '', timestamp)
datetime.datetime.strptime(conformed_timestamp, "%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%f%z" )

If your system does not support the %z strptime directive (you see something like ValueError: 'z' is a bad directive in format '%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%f%z') then you need to manually offset the time from Z (UTC). Note %z may not work on your system in Python versions < 3 as it depended on the C library support which varies across system/Python build type (i.e., Jython, Cython, etc.).

import re
import datetime

# This regex removes all colons and all
# dashes EXCEPT for the dash indicating + or - utc offset for the timezone
conformed_timestamp = re.sub(r"[:]|([-](?!((\d{2}[:]\d{2})|(\d{4}))$))", '', timestamp)

# Split on the offset to remove it. Use a capture group to keep the delimiter
split_timestamp = re.split(r"([+|-])",conformed_timestamp)
main_timestamp = split_timestamp[0]
if len(split_timestamp) == 3:
    sign = split_timestamp[1]
    offset = split_timestamp[2]
else:
    sign = None
    offset = None

# Generate the datetime object without the offset at UTC time
output_datetime = datetime.datetime.strptime(main_timestamp +"Z", "%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%fZ" )
if offset:
    # Create timedelta based on offset
    offset_delta = datetime.timedelta(hours=int(sign+offset[:-2]), minutes=int(sign+offset[-2:]))

    # Offset datetime with timedelta
    output_datetime = output_datetime + offset_delta
9
  • 1
    Note, this deals with timezones appropriately ( note the .%fZ) Dec 11, 2015 at 21:45
  • 1
    This will fail on valid ISO 8601 datetime like 20160628T100000. Jun 28, 2016 at 13:01
  • 9
    Oh dear, Python. What the hell are you doing?!?
    – Robino
    Nov 13, 2017 at 15:29
  • 1
    @mhwh good catch, I have updated the code Jul 23, 2020 at 1:18
  • 1
    relevant docs: If capturing parentheses are used in pattern, then the text of all groups in the pattern are also returned as part of the resulting list. . LOL bc i literally had the comment Use a capture group to keep the delimiter just above. Jul 23, 2020 at 1:19
44

Arrow looks promising for this:

>>> import arrow
>>> arrow.get('2014-11-13T14:53:18.694072+00:00').datetime
datetime.datetime(2014, 11, 13, 14, 53, 18, 694072, tzinfo=tzoffset(None, 0))

Arrow is a Python library that provides a sensible, intelligent way of creating, manipulating, formatting and converting dates and times. Arrow is simple, lightweight and heavily inspired by moment.js and requests.

19

You should keep an eye on the timezone information, as you might get into trouble when comparing non-tz-aware datetimes with tz-aware ones.

It's probably the best to always make them tz-aware (even if only as UTC), unless you really know why it wouldn't be of any use to do so.

#-----------------------------------------------
import datetime
import pytz
import dateutil.parser
#-----------------------------------------------

utc = pytz.utc
BERLIN = pytz.timezone('Europe/Berlin')
#-----------------------------------------------

def to_iso8601(when=None, tz=BERLIN):
  if not when:
    when = datetime.datetime.now(tz)
  if not when.tzinfo:
    when = tz.localize(when)
  _when = when.strftime("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S.%f%z")
  return _when[:-8] + _when[-5:] # Remove microseconds
#-----------------------------------------------

def from_iso8601(when=None, tz=BERLIN):
  _when = dateutil.parser.parse(when)
  if not _when.tzinfo:
    _when = tz.localize(_when)
  return _when
#-----------------------------------------------
9

I haven't tried it yet, but pyiso8601 promises to support this.

2
  • 4
    pyiso8601 has a very limited range of formats which it accepts. better use dateutil.parser --> "Currently the following formats are handled: 1) 2006-01-01T00:00:00Z 2) 2006-01-01T00:00:00[+-]00:00" Having [+-]0000 as tz-information is just as valid under the iso standard. IIRC on [+-]0000 it would just discard the tz-information...
    – Daniel F
    Sep 22, 2013 at 9:15
  • 1
    pyiso8601 has been updated recently (circa Feb 2014) and now handles [+-]0000. It also handles just dates. I've been using pyiso8601 to good effect.
    – Dave Hein
    Nov 13, 2014 at 0:43
8
import datetime, time
def convert_enddate_to_seconds(self, ts):
    """Takes ISO 8601 format(string) and converts into epoch time."""
    dt = datetime.datetime.strptime(ts[:-7],'%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S.%f')+\
                datetime.timedelta(hours=int(ts[-5:-3]),
                minutes=int(ts[-2:]))*int(ts[-6:-5]+'1')
    seconds = time.mktime(dt.timetuple()) + dt.microsecond/1000000.0
    return seconds

This also includes the milliseconds and time zone.

If the time is '2012-09-30T15:31:50.262-08:00', this will convert into epoch time.

>>> import datetime, time
>>> ts = '2012-09-30T15:31:50.262-08:00'
>>> dt = datetime.datetime.strptime(ts[:-7],'%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S.%f')+ datetime.timedelta(hours=int(ts[-5:-3]), minutes=int(ts[-2:]))*int(ts[-6:-5]+'1')
>>> seconds = time.mktime(dt.timetuple()) + dt.microsecond/1000000.0
>>> seconds
1348990310.26
6

Both ways:

Epoch to ISO time:

isoTime = time.strftime('%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ', time.gmtime(epochTime))

ISO time to Epoch:

epochTime = time.mktime(time.strptime(isoTime, '%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ'))
4
  • 2
    but you are limited to UTC only (z)
    – confiq
    Jun 19, 2016 at 9:03
  • 2
    Parses neither decimal seconds nor timezones (other than "Z")
    – Robino
    Nov 13, 2017 at 16:58
  • Good point, however you could modify the text string params to fit your specific format. docs.python.org/2/library/time.html You just need to manipulate the string to fit your input.
    – billmanH
    Nov 13, 2017 at 18:13
  • 1
    Moreover, you can set arbitrary format instead of ISO: time.strftime("%d-%m-%y %H:%M", time.localtime(EPOCH_TIME)).
    – whtyger
    Jan 17, 2019 at 11:54
5

Isodate seems to have the most complete support.

1
  • 2
    syntax would be: dt = isodate.parse_datetime(ts)
    – ryantuck
    Jul 6, 2015 at 18:53
4

aniso8601 should handle this. It also understands timezones, Python 2 and Python 3, and it has a reasonable coverage of the rest of ISO 8601, should you ever need it.

import aniso8601
aniso8601.parse_datetime('2007-03-04T21:08:12')
-15

Here is a super simple way to do these kind of conversions. No parsing, or extra libraries required. It is clean, simple, and fast.

import datetime
import time

################################################
#
# Takes the time (in seconds),
#   and returns a string of the time in ISO8601 format.
# Note: Timezone is UTC
#
################################################

def TimeToISO8601(seconds):
   strKv = datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(seconds).strftime('%Y-%m-%d')
   strKv = strKv + "T"
   strKv = strKv + datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(seconds).strftime('%H:%M:%S')
   strKv = strKv +"Z"
   return strKv

################################################
#
# Takes a string of the time in ISO8601 format,
#   and returns the time (in seconds).
# Note: Timezone is UTC
#
################################################

def ISO8601ToTime(strISOTime):
   K1 = 0
   K2 = 9999999999
   K3 = 0
   counter = 0
   while counter < 95:
     K3 = (K1 + K2) / 2
     strK4 = TimeToISO8601(K3)
     if strK4 < strISOTime:
       K1 = K3
     if strK4 > strISOTime:
       K2 = K3
     counter = counter + 1
   return K3

################################################
#
# Takes a string of the time in ISO8601 (UTC) format,
#   and returns a python DateTime object.
# Note: returned value is your local time zone.
#
################################################

def ISO8601ToDateTime(strISOTime):
   return time.gmtime(ISO8601ToTime(strISOTime))


#To test:
Test = "2014-09-27T12:05:06.9876"
print ("The test value is: " + Test)
Ans = ISO8601ToTime(Test)
print ("The answer in seconds is: " + str(Ans))
print ("And a Python datetime object is: " + str(ISO8601ToDateTime(Test)))
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  • 10
    No parsing ? Clean ? Fast ? What are those hardcoded values like 9999999999 ? 95 ? Better use a library ... May 19, 2015 at 21:07
  • 4
    That's neither simple nor clean and surely slower than all the other proposed answers... Apr 1, 2016 at 16:54

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