313

What is the most exact way of seeing how long something, for example a method call, took in code?

The easiest and quickest I would guess is this:

DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
{
    // Do some work
}
TimeSpan timeItTook = DateTime.Now - start;

But how exact is this? Are there better ways?

  • 28
    You won't bet on .NET classes because you don't know how they work? Does that mean you're afraid to use the String class also? Anyway, the documentation of the Stopwatch class explicitly says that it is using the QueryPerformanceCounter() Win32 API function. – Philippe Leybaert Jun 9 '09 at 10:58
  • 1
    The String class has nothing to do with this. If Stopwatch exists in .NET how should I know it's better than QueryPerformanceCounter ? which is the best option that can exists !! – Alin Vasile Jun 9 '09 at 11:27
  • 13
    @pixel3cs: downvoting a correct answer because you got criticized in a a comment is not very mature – Philippe Leybaert Jun 9 '09 at 11:36
  • 10
    @pixel3cs But you had time reading the Kernel32 api? – Svish Jun 9 '09 at 12:19
579

A better way is to use the Stopwatch class:

using System.Diagnostics;
// ...

Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

sw.Start();

// ...

sw.Stop();

Console.WriteLine("Elapsed={0}",sw.Elapsed);
  • 3
    Cool, had no idea this class even existed. – Svish Jun 9 '09 at 11:03
  • 5
    If you need to know the resolution of the Stopwatch timings on a particular machine then you can use the Stopwatch.Frequency property. – LukeH Jun 9 '09 at 11:03
  • 28
    Also, the Stopwatch.StartNew() static method is a convenient way to both create and start the Stopwatch on a single line. – JessieArr Nov 4 '16 at 18:55
  • 5
    MS Documentation – UpTheCreek Jun 2 '17 at 9:20
169

As others have said, Stopwatch is a good class to use here. You can wrap it in a helpful method:

public static TimeSpan Time(Action action)
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    action();
    stopwatch.Stop();
    return stopwatch.Elapsed;
}

(Note the use of Stopwatch.StartNew(). I prefer this to creating a Stopwatch and then calling Start() in terms of simplicity.) Obviously this incurs the hit of invoking a delegate, but in the vast majority of cases that won't be relevant. You'd then write:

TimeSpan time = StopwatchUtil.Time(() =>
{
    // Do some work
});

You could even make an ITimer interface for this, with implementations of StopwatchTimer, CpuTimer etc where available.

  • 2
    I think real Jon Skeet does not have time to post answers on SO. All you guys care all about reputation, not for the best answer. Some SO users may have 2 accounts and they vote for themselves but from another account. Also some users read the best answer then answer with the same solution, the scope is to receive votes from others. What is better than QueryPerformanceFrequency ??? – Alin Vasile Jun 10 '09 at 9:12
  • 26
    pixel3cs: That sounds distinctly like sour grapes to me. To be clear: are you accusing me of vote fraud? Are you accusing me of not being "the real Jon Skeet"? As for why Stopwatch is better than using P/Invoke: It's simpler to use, but gets the same results. – Jon Skeet Jun 10 '09 at 9:26
  • 6
    It's a shame to accuse someone like Jon Skeet of vote fraud! People like him must be respected for what they do for the progrmming community. don't care for these Jon, People Love you and trust you. – Abdullah BaMusa Jun 10 '09 at 10:03
  • 8
    @NAKRO: Well that's because the "work" you've said to do is just "start a new task". And that really doesn't take long. So yes, it does give the correct result, but you're not measuring what you really want to measure. If you want to measure how long it takes for the task to complete, then you need to wait for it to finish. – Jon Skeet Feb 12 '14 at 14:06
  • 5
    @NAKRO: Well you can, but you need to make sure that the "action" involved both starts all the tasks and waits for them to finish. – Jon Skeet Feb 12 '14 at 14:11
76

As others said, Stopwatch should be the right tool for this. There can be few improvements made to it though, see this thread specifically: Benchmarking small code samples in C#, can this implementation be improved?.

I have seen some useful tips by Thomas Maierhofer here

Basically his code looks like:

//prevent the JIT Compiler from optimizing Fkt calls away
long seed = Environment.TickCount;

//use the second Core/Processor for the test
Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity = new IntPtr(2);

//prevent "Normal" Processes from interrupting Threads
Process.GetCurrentProcess().PriorityClass = ProcessPriorityClass.High;

//prevent "Normal" Threads from interrupting this thread
Thread.CurrentThread.Priority = ThreadPriority.Highest;

//warm up
method();

var stopwatch = new Stopwatch()
for (int i = 0; i < repetitions; i++)
{
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (int j = 0; j < iterations; j++)
        method();
    stopwatch.Stop();
    print stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds;
}

Another approach is to rely on Process.TotalProcessTime to measure how long the CPU has been kept busy running the very code/process, as shown here This can reflect more real scenario since no other process affects the measurement. It does something like:

 var start = Process.GetCurrentProcess().TotalProcessorTime;
 method();
 var stop = Process.GetCurrentProcess().TotalProcessorTime;
 print (end - begin).TotalMilliseconds;

A naked, detailed implementation of the samething can be found here.

I wrote a helper class to perform both in an easy to use manner:

public class Clock
{
    interface IStopwatch
    {
        bool IsRunning { get; }
        TimeSpan Elapsed { get; }

        void Start();
        void Stop();
        void Reset();
    }



    class TimeWatch : IStopwatch
    {
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

        public TimeSpan Elapsed
        {
            get { return stopwatch.Elapsed; }
        }

        public bool IsRunning
        {
            get { return stopwatch.IsRunning; }
        }



        public TimeWatch()
        {
            if (!Stopwatch.IsHighResolution)
                throw new NotSupportedException("Your hardware doesn't support high resolution counter");

            //prevent the JIT Compiler from optimizing Fkt calls away
            long seed = Environment.TickCount;

            //use the second Core/Processor for the test
            Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessorAffinity = new IntPtr(2);

            //prevent "Normal" Processes from interrupting Threads
            Process.GetCurrentProcess().PriorityClass = ProcessPriorityClass.High;

            //prevent "Normal" Threads from interrupting this thread
            Thread.CurrentThread.Priority = ThreadPriority.Highest;
        }



        public void Start()
        {
            stopwatch.Start();
        }

        public void Stop()
        {
            stopwatch.Stop();
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            stopwatch.Reset();
        }
    }



    class CpuWatch : IStopwatch
    {
        TimeSpan startTime;
        TimeSpan endTime;
        bool isRunning;



        public TimeSpan Elapsed
        {
            get
            {
                if (IsRunning)
                    throw new NotImplementedException("Getting elapsed span while watch is running is not implemented");

                return endTime - startTime;
            }
        }

        public bool IsRunning
        {
            get { return isRunning; }
        }



        public void Start()
        {
            startTime = Process.GetCurrentProcess().TotalProcessorTime;
            isRunning = true;
        }

        public void Stop()
        {
            endTime = Process.GetCurrentProcess().TotalProcessorTime;
            isRunning = false;
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            startTime = TimeSpan.Zero;
            endTime = TimeSpan.Zero;
        }
    }



    public static void BenchmarkTime(Action action, int iterations = 10000)
    {
        Benchmark<TimeWatch>(action, iterations);
    }

    static void Benchmark<T>(Action action, int iterations) where T : IStopwatch, new()
    {
        //clean Garbage
        GC.Collect();

        //wait for the finalizer queue to empty
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        //clean Garbage
        GC.Collect();

        //warm up
        action();

        var stopwatch = new T();
        var timings = new double[5];
        for (int i = 0; i < timings.Length; i++)
        {
            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int j = 0; j < iterations; j++)
                action();
            stopwatch.Stop();
            timings[i] = stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds;
            print timings[i];
        }
        print "normalized mean: " + timings.NormalizedMean().ToString();
    }

    public static void BenchmarkCpu(Action action, int iterations = 10000)
    {
        Benchmark<CpuWatch>(action, iterations);
    }
}

Just call

Clock.BenchmarkTime(() =>
{
    //code

}, 10000000);

or

Clock.BenchmarkCpu(() =>
{
    //code

}, 10000000);

The last part of the Clock is the tricky part. If you want to display the final timing, its up to you to choose what sort of timing you want. I wrote an extension method NormalizedMean which gives you the mean of the read timings discarding the noise. I mean I calculate the the deviation of each timing from the actual mean, and then I discard the values which was farer (only the slower ones) from the mean of deviation (called absolute deviation; note that its not the often heard standard deviation), and finally return the mean of remaining values. This means, for instance, if timed values are { 1, 2, 3, 2, 100 } (in ms or whatever), it discards 100, and returns the mean of { 1, 2, 3, 2 } which is 2. Or if timings are { 240, 220, 200, 220, 220, 270 }, it discards 270, and returns the mean of { 240, 220, 200, 220, 220 } which is 220.

public static double NormalizedMean(this ICollection<double> values)
{
    if (values.Count == 0)
        return double.NaN;

    var deviations = values.Deviations().ToArray();
    var meanDeviation = deviations.Sum(t => Math.Abs(t.Item2)) / values.Count;
    return deviations.Where(t => t.Item2 > 0 || Math.Abs(t.Item2) <= meanDeviation).Average(t => t.Item1);
}

public static IEnumerable<Tuple<double, double>> Deviations(this ICollection<double> values)
{
    if (values.Count == 0)
        yield break;

    var avg = values.Average();
    foreach (var d in values)
        yield return Tuple.Create(d, avg - d);
}
  • 1
    Good details on controlling the environment and ignoring the spikes! Thanks. – asgerhallas Jun 7 '13 at 18:45
  • In the original example, the long seed = Environment.TickCount; was used as input to the algorithm under test, in order to make it non-deterministic and prevent it from being evaluated at compile-time. That seed is not being used here. – piedar Nov 7 '19 at 16:55
13

Use the Stopwatch class

  • 2
    Downvoters: we'll be happy to know what's wrong! – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 9 '09 at 11:32
13

System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch is designed for this task.

  • 1
    See the comments on the question above, and you'll see why. – Philippe Leybaert Jun 9 '09 at 12:35
5

Stopwatch is fine, but loop the work 10^6 times, then divide by 10^6. You'll get a lot more precision.

  • 2
    Good point, but would still need something to take the time on those 10^6 times :) – Svish Jun 10 '09 at 6:53
  • 2
    Put Stopwatch around the whole thing. I thought that was clear. – Mike Dunlavey Jun 10 '09 at 11:19
3

I'm using this:

HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(myUrl);
System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();

timer.Start();

HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();

statusCode = response.StatusCode.ToString();

response.Close();

timer.Stop();

From my blog: C# Time Measurement For Performance Testing (Not in English)

  • Mind sharing the type of the variable timer and how to read out the time that passed? – Werner Henze Feb 3 '16 at 12:38
-12

Yes there are some function on Windows kernel

[System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("KERNEL32")]
private static extern bool QueryPerformanceCounter(ref long lpPerformanceCount);

[System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("KERNEL32")]
private static extern bool QueryPerformanceFrequency(ref long lpFrequency);

public static float CurrentSecond
{
    get
    {
        long current = 0;
        QueryPerformanceCounter(ref current);
        long frequency = 0;
        QueryPerformanceFrequency(ref frequency);
        return (float) current / (float) frequency;
    }
}
  • Is this accurate for having two separated method p/call? Any suggestion? – Bamboo Jul 1 '11 at 5:44
  • 16
    @Dominikakagalaris Probably as it seems much more complicated and less reliable than the other answers here, a 'long' is cast to a 'float', there's the possibility of a division-by-zero, and this functionality is already wrapped in the Stopwatch class (see comments on question). – g t Jul 17 '12 at 7:51
  • 1
    In addition to the issues mentioned by g t (possible divide-by-zero, extra complexity, precision loss in cast, etc) this does not answer the Question, it only says how to get a ~precise second. The question asks for a precise way to time some work, which is not immediately obvious from the answer given. You would want to store the counters some how and only divide by the frequency at the end. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… – Arkaine55 Jun 9 '14 at 19:22

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