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Possible Duplicate:
round() for float in C++

I have a double (call it x), meant to be 55 but in actuality stored as 54.999999999999943157 which I just realised.

So when I do

double x = 54.999999999999943157;
int y = (int) x;

y = 54 instead of 55!

This puzzled me for a long time. How do I get it to correctly round?

marked as duplicate by Wooble, Carl Norum, Pubby, edA-qa mort-ora-y, Andrew Marshall Mar 14 '12 at 5:15

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  • 1
    You could add 0.5 to the number and then do your cast to let it truncate to an int. Do you need to round negative numbers? – Blastfurnace Mar 14 '12 at 3:03
  • 4
    You can use this preprocessor definition: #define ROUND_2_INT(f) ((int)(f >= 0.0 ? (f + 0.5) : (f - 0.5))) – c00000fd May 1 '14 at 1:41
  • Actually 54.999999999999943157 is 8 ULPs below exactly representable 55 if by double you mean binary64 from IEEE 754. So this is not how 55 is actually stored, it's the consequence of how imprecise your calculation of it was. – Ruslan Jul 15 '16 at 12:07
  • Adding +0.5 to a negative input before turning it into an int will give the wrong answer. The correct quick-and-dirty way is to test the input sign for <0, and then SUBTRACT 0.5 from the negative inputs before turning them into an int. Most of the following answers do not explain this properly. Note high-accuracy procedures should use the new slower "round()" function. – DragonLord Aug 13 '16 at 22:37
107

add 0.5 before casting (if x > 0) or subtract 0.5 (if x < 0), because the compiler will always truncate.

float x = 55; // stored as 54.999999...
x = x + 0.5 - (x<0); // x is now 55.499999...
int y = (int)x; // truncated to 55

C++11 also introduces std::round, which likely uses a similar logic of adding 0.5 to |x| under the hood (see the link if interested) but is obviously more robust.

A follow up question might be why the float isn't stored as exactly 55. For an explanation, see this stackoverflow answer.

  • 2
    I wouldn't use the phrase "round down", because that could be interpreted as rounding -0.5 to -1. – Hurkyl Mar 14 '12 at 3:16
  • 31
    -1 This method does not take into consideration negative numbers. – Verax Jul 8 '13 at 9:01
  • 6
    @NickXTsui did you see the last sentence? "Note that this will not work for negative numbers." – Moritz May 15 '14 at 4:38
  • 2
    What do you mean by stored as stored as 54.999999...? 55 is exactly representable in binary32 from IEEE 754. Its representation is 0x425c0000. As you can see, it's more than exact: It has plenty of digits to store some fractional part you add to it. And it's especially true of 0.5, which is a power of two. – Ruslan Jul 15 '16 at 12:03
  • 3
    This is inaccurate & possibly slow. See clang-tidy for an explanation : clang.llvm.org/extra/clang-tidy/checks/… – ACyclic Nov 2 '16 at 13:36
43

Casting is not a mathematical operation and doesn't behave as such. Try

int y = (int)round(x);
  • 7
    The cast is unnecessary; the result will be implicitly converted to int. – Keith Thompson Mar 14 '12 at 3:04
  • 5
    I could never remember the C type promotion rules and I think that it doesn't hurt to state type casts explicitly everywhere, them being such a sticky issue. – MK. Mar 14 '12 at 3:10
  • 5
    @Steve #include <math.h>, STANDARDS The round() , lround() , and llround() functions conform to ISO/IEC 9899:1999(E). – MK. Mar 14 '12 at 3:14
  • 1
    @SteveFallows: It exists in C++11. – GManNickG Mar 14 '12 at 3:24
  • 7
    @MK.: It's not a promotion, it's just an implicit conversion. An assignment, initialization, or parameter passing will implicitly convert any numeric type to any other numeric type. Unnecessary casts can be harmful. For example, n = (int)round(x); looks ok -- but what if n is of type long? – Keith Thompson Mar 14 '12 at 6:23
7

Casting to an int truncates the value. Adding 0.5 causes it to do proper rounding.

int y = (int)(x + 0.5);
  • 6
    not valid for negative numbers, as mentioned in one of the comments above. Can use 'floor' instead of cast if you are doing this. – mehfoos yacoob Aug 14 '13 at 10:54
4

It is worth noting that what you're doing isn't rounding, it's casting. Casting using (int) x truncates the decimal value of x. As in your example, if x = 3.9995, the .9995 gets truncated and x = 3.

As proposed by many others, one solution is to add 0.5 to x, and then cast.

  • Thank you, actually I only just realised I even need to round (I am using only integers in my program) – midnightBlue Mar 14 '12 at 3:11
-4
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    double x=54.999999999999943157;
    int y=ceil(x);//The ceil() function returns the smallest integer no less than x
    return 0;
}
  • 5
    This forces numbers up though... 54.000000000000001 will become 55. – Albert Renshaw Sep 11 '14 at 20:11
  • 1
    @AlbertRenshaw, right - which means this answer is wrong. – cp.engr Aug 28 '15 at 23:09

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