84

If I use a break statement, it will only break inner loop and I need to use some flag to break the outer loop. But if there are many nested loops, the code will not look good.

Is there any other way to break all of the loops? (Please don't use goto stmt.)

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
   for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
       if(condition) {
            // both of the loops need to break and control will go to stmt2
       }
   }

}

stmt2

13 Answers 13

41

Use:

if (condition) {
    i = j = 1000;
    break;
}
  • 44
    Works, but ugly and not general. What if someone changes the limit to 2000 (suppose the code is longer, so you don't immediately notice it)? – ugoren Mar 14 '12 at 8:17
  • 1
    @ugoren It's also so simple then. what if you used a const int count =1000 , in the global Initialization. or as a #define macro. – Laksith Oct 19 '15 at 7:37
  • 4
    As @ugoren points out, it's not a general solution. Since this is the first Google hit for this question, it would be nice if the general solution had been selected. Well people are used to checking out the #2 anyway. – BeeOnRope Nov 4 '16 at 23:30
  • I guess only need i=1000? – Peter Wu Aug 2 '19 at 2:05
168

No, don't spoil the fun with a break. This is the last remaining valid use of goto ;)

If not this then you could use flags to break out of deep nested loops.

Another approach to breaking out of a nested loop is to factor out both loops into a separate function, and return from that function when you want to exit.

Summarized - to break out of nested loops:

  1. use goto
  2. use flags
  3. factor out loops into separate function calls

Couldn't resist including xkcd here :)

enter image description here

source

Goto's are considered harmful but as many people in the comments suggest it need not be. If used judiciously it can be a great tool. Anything used in moderation is fun.

  • 25
    Goto is about as clear as you'll get here, yeah. Setting the exit variable to 1000 is even more kludgy. – correnos Mar 14 '12 at 4:33
  • 3
    I would like to add that gotos are not explicitly evil, they just can be used for evil. I find that there are quite a few cases, for example this, where they are the best solution. "Don't use gotos" is a good start, but I think the next step in skill allows you "Don't use long-range gotos". – Aatch Mar 14 '12 at 4:37
  • 1
    I would like to disagree with this: "Creating a function results in exponential amounts of add/subtracting the stack pointer". If there is a local (static) function which is called at only one point in the program flow, any half-decent compiler will inline it, and the resulting code is essentially the same as with goto. This possibly the easiest optimization case for any compiler. – DrV Nov 17 '17 at 11:25
  • 1
    Refactoring is usually the cleanest solution. However, if any outside-of-loop variables are changed during the inner loop, things get complicated. One possibility is to pass the variable to the inner function by reference (pointer), but this may confuse the compiler optimization and produce unnecessary extra code. Another possibility is to make such variables static at the module level, but that is not very beautiful, either. C is unfortunately missing nested functions, as they would solve this problem — unless you are willing to bind yourself to using gcc which provides an extension. – DrV Nov 17 '17 at 11:34
  • 1
    +1. And Donald E. Knuth's Structured Programming with go to Statements (wiki.c2.com/?StructuredProgrammingWithGoToStatements) is an interesting article to balance Dijkstra's. – kmkaplan Mar 9 '18 at 9:21
34
bool stop = false;
for (int i = 0; (i < 1000) && !stop; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; (j < 1000) && !stop; j++)
    {
        if (condition)
            stop = true;
    }
}
  • Solution still increments both variables by one on break which can cause trouble – TheSola10 Mar 30 '17 at 7:33
  • 4
    One can set "stop = true;" and then "break;". Then, right after the end of the inside "for" loop, do "if (stop) break;". – Jeff Grigg Aug 29 '17 at 5:49
24

One way is to put all the nested loops into a function and return from the inner most loop incase of a need to break out of all loops.

function() 
{    
  for(int i=0; i<1000; i++)
  {
   for(int j=0; j<1000;j++)
   {
      if (condition)
        return;
   }
  }    
}
  • 1
    seems the best solution for me – Luca Steeb Mar 3 '15 at 13:32
16

I think goto will solve the problem

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
        if (condition) {
            goto end;
        }
    }
}

end:
stmt2 
13

You'll need a boolean variable, if you want it readable:

bool broke = false;
for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
  for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
    if (condition) {
      broke = true;
      break;
    }
  }
  if (broke)
    break;
}

If you want it less readable you can join the boolean evaluation:

bool broke = false;
for(int i = 0; i < 1000 && !broke; i++) {
  for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
    if (condition) {
      broke = true;
      break;
    }
  }
}

As an ultimate way you can invalidate the initial loop:

for(int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
  for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
    if (condition) {
      i = size;
      break;
    }
  }
}
9

Use this wise advice from LLVM team:

"Turn Predicate Loops into Predicate Functions"

See:

http://llvm.org/docs/CodingStandards.html#turn-predicate-loops-into-predicate-functions

4

Caution: This answer shows a truly obscure construction.

If you are using GCC, check out this library. Like in PHP, break can accept the number of nested loops you want to exit. You can write something like this:

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
   for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
       if(condition) {
            // break two nested enclosing loops
            break(2);
       }
   }
}
  • And under the hood it is indeed using goto :) – iX3 Aug 16 '19 at 11:51
  • @iX3 I can use inline assembler and jmp instruction if that helps. – DaBler Aug 19 '19 at 9:48
  • @DaBler, I didn't realize you were the author of that library. My comment was not meant as feedback but rather noting that this library uses the same method as the accepted answer. Hopefully your comment was meant as a joke because I think that using a language feature (even goto) is far preferably to inline asm (machine specific, easier to make a mistake, harder to read, ...). – iX3 Aug 19 '19 at 11:35
3

If you need the values of i and j, this should work but with less performance than others

for(i;i< 1000; i++){    
    for(j; j< 1000; j++){
        if(condition)
            break;
    }
    if(condition) //the same condition
        break;
}
  • Note that if the condition is dependent on j then the value of the condition needs to be stored in some way for this to still work. – SuperBiasedMan Jun 3 '15 at 16:02
  • 1
    You are right but after break, the value of j doesn't change and so is the value of the condition. – Ali Eren Çelik Jun 4 '15 at 7:48
  • This is a broken solution and not valid in general. Either j isn't defined outside its loop or for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) { if (workComplete[i][j]) break; /* do work */ workComplete[i][j] = true; } if (workComplete[i][j]) break; ... } is going to always break out of the outer loop after the first iteration of the inner loop. – Chai T. Rex Jan 1 at 2:49
2
for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
   for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
       if(condition) {
            goto end;
   }
} 

end:
-2
int i = 0, j= 0;

for(i;i< 1000; i++){    
    for(j; j< 1000; j++){
        if(condition){
            i = j = 1001;
            break;
        }
    }
}

Will break both the loops.

-3
i = 0;

do
{
  for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) // by the way, your code uses i++ here!
  {
     if (condition)
     {
       break;
     }
  }

  ++i;

} while ((i < 1000) && !condition);
-3
for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    for(int j = 0; j < 1000; i++) {
       if(condition) {
          func(para1, para2...);
          return;
       }
    }
}

func(para1, para2...) {
    stmt2;
}
  • So basically you're saying that it should (1) make a bunch of extra function calls and then (2) spin for the rest of the time when condition becomes false. Oh, and the second loop will run forever because it increments i instead of j, whoops... – iX3 Aug 16 '19 at 11:54

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