42

I searched Java's internal representation for String, but I've got two materials which look reliable but inconsistent.

One is:

http://www.codeguru.com/cpp/misc/misc/multi-lingualsupport/article.php/c10451

and it says:

Java uses UTF-16 for the internal text representation and supports a non-standard modification of UTF-8 for string serialization.

The other is:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8#Modified_UTF-8

and it says:

Tcl also uses the same modified UTF-8[25] as Java for internal representation of Unicode data, but uses strict CESU-8 for external data.

Modified UTF-8? Or UTF-16? Which one is correct? And how many bytes does Java use for a char in memory?

Please let me know which one is correct and how many bytes it uses.

55

Java uses UTF-16 for the internal text representation

The representation for String and StringBuilder etc in Java is UTF-16

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/technotes/guides/intl/overview.html

How is text represented in the Java platform?

The Java programming language is based on the Unicode character set, and several libraries implement the Unicode standard. The primitive data type char in the Java programming language is an unsigned 16-bit integer that can represent a Unicode code point in the range U+0000 to U+FFFF, or the code units of UTF-16. The various types and classes in the Java platform that represent character sequences - char[], implementations of java.lang.CharSequence (such as the String class), and implementations of java.text.CharacterIterator - are UTF-16 sequences.

At the JVM level, if you are using -XX:+UseCompressedStrings (which is default for some updates of Java 6) The actual in-memory representation can be 8-bit, ISO-8859-1 but only for strings which do not need UTF-16 encoding.

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/vmoptions-jsp-140102.html

and supports a non-standard modification of UTF-8 for string serialization.

Serialized Strings use UTF-8 by default.

And how many bytes does Java use for a char in memory?

A char is always two bytes, if you ignore the need for padding in an Object.

Note: a code point (which allows character > 65535) can use one or two characters, i.e. 2 or 4 bytes.

13

Prior to Java 9, the standard in-memory representation for a Java String is UTF-16 code-units held in a char[]. Modified UTF-8 is used in other contexts; e.g. in ".class" files, and the object serialization format.

You can confirm this by looking at the source code of the java.lang.String class.

With Java 6 update 21 and later, there was a non-standard option (-XX:UseCompressedStrings) to enable compressed strings. This feature was removed in Java 7.

For Java 9 and later, the behavior if String has been changed to use a compact representation for Strings by default. The java command documentation now says this:

-XX:-CompactStrings

Disables the Compact Strings feature. By default, this option is enabled. When this option is enabled, Java Strings containing only single-byte characters are internally represented and stored as single-byte-per-character Strings using ISO-8859-1 / Latin-1 encoding. This reduces, by 50%, the amount of space required for Strings containing only single-byte characters. For Java Strings containing at least one multibyte character: these are represented and stored as 2 bytes per character using UTF-16 encoding. Disabling the Compact Strings feature forces the use of UTF-16 encoding as the internal representation for all Java Strings.

Note that neither "compressed" or "compact" strings used / use UTF-8 encoding.

See also:

12

UTF-16.

From http://java.sun.com/javase/technologies/core/basic/intl/faq.jsp :

How is text represented in the Java platform?

The Java programming language is based on the Unicode character set, and several libraries implement the Unicode standard. The primitive data type char in the Java programming language is an unsigned 16-bit integer that can represent a Unicode code point in the range U+0000 to U+FFFF, or the code units of UTF-16. The various types and classes in the Java platform that represent character sequences - char[], implementations of java.lang.CharSequence (such as the String class), and implementations of java.text.CharacterIterator - are UTF-16 sequences.

3

The size of a char is 2 bytes.

Therefore, I would say that Java uses UTF-16 for internal String representation.

  • 1
    Unicode characters can be 4 bytes in Java. – tchrist Mar 17 '12 at 14:09
  • @tchrist How? How can a character in Java be 4 bytes? – Koray Tugay Jan 21 '16 at 17:25
  • @KorayTugay Unicode characters (code points) are values between 0 and 0x10FFFF. – tchrist Jan 21 '16 at 23:29
  • 2
    @tchrist Java will treat a 4 byte Unicode Character as 2 Java Characters. Please see: tugay.biz/2016/07/stringlength-method-may-fool-you.html – Koray Tugay Jul 10 '16 at 11:54
-6

Java stores strings internally as UTF-16 and uses 2 bytes for each character.

  • 11
    This answer is incorrect. Because Java uses UTF-16, each Unicode character is either 2 bytes or 4 bytes. – tchrist Mar 17 '12 at 14:08
  • @tchrist How can a UTF-16 encode end up in 4 bytes? Isn't UTF-16 always 2 bytes? – Koray Tugay Jan 28 '16 at 14:40
  • 5
    @KorayTugay No, UTF-16 is either 2 bytes or 4 bytes. It is a variable-width encoding just like UTF-8. Only the obsolete UCS-2 is 2 bytes, and that's long dead. – tchrist Jan 29 '16 at 1:15
  • The code unit of UT-16 is always 2 bytes. But the character itself needs 1 code unit or 2 code units hence 2 or 4 bytes. – Ludovic Kuty Jan 22 at 9:30
-6

java is available in 18 international languages and following UNICODE character set, which contains all the characters which are available in 18 international languages and contains 65536 characters.And java following UTF-16 so the size of char in java is 2 bytes.

  • 2
    The size of a Unicode character in Java varies between 2 bytes and 4 bytes, depending on whether we’re in plane 0 or not. – tchrist Mar 17 '12 at 14:09
  • A char is 2 bytes but a character (char with no typewriter font) is 2 or 4 bytes as @tchrist mentionned – Ludovic Kuty Jan 22 at 9:31

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