104

Is there a "computationally" quick way to get the count of an iterator?

int i = 0;
for ( ; some_iterator.hasNext() ; ++i ) some_iterator.next();

... seems like a waste of CPU cycles.

2
  • 2
    An iterator doesn't necessarily correspond to something with a "count"... – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 15 '12 at 13:01
  • Iterators are what they are; to iterate to the next object of a collection (it can be anything like set, array, etc.) Why do they need to tell the size when they don't care what they are trying to iterate for? to provide an implementation-independent method for access, in which the user does not need to know whether the underlying implementation is some form of array or of linked list, and allows the user go through the collection without explicit indexing. penguin.ewu.edu/~trolfe/LinkedSort/Iterator.html – ecle Mar 15 '12 at 13:01
69

If you've just got the iterator then that's what you'll have to do - it doesn't know how many items it's got left to iterate over, so you can't query it for that result. There are utility methods that will seem to do this efficiently (such as Iterators.size() in Guava), but underneath they're just consuming the iterator and counting as they go, the same as in your example.

However, many iterators come from collections, which you can often query for their size. And if it's a user made class you're getting the iterator for, you could look to provide a size() method on that class.

In short, in the situation where you only have the iterator then there's no better way, but much more often than not you have access to the underlying collection or object from which you may be able to get the size directly.

1
  • Beware of the side-effect of Iterators.size(...) (mentioned in other comments below and in java-doc): "Returns the number of elements remaining in iterator. The iterator will be left exhausted: its hasNext() method will return false." That means, you can't use the Iterator anymore afterwards. Lists.newArrayList(some_iterator); may help. – MichaelCkr Aug 19 '20 at 10:58
93

Using Guava library:

int size = Iterators.size(iterator);

Internally it just iterates over all elements so its just for convenience.

3
  • 10
    This is very elegant. Just remember that you are consuming your iterator (ie., the iterator will be empty afterwards) – lolski May 2 '18 at 12:14
  • 1
    This is not "computationally quick", this is a convenience method that has the undesired side effect of consuming the iterator. – Zak Aug 16 '19 at 16:55
  • Can you please explain how does this work ? @Andrejs List<Tuple2<String, Integer>> wordCountsWithGroupByKey = wordsPairRdd.groupByKey() .mapValues(intIterable -> Iterables.size(intIterable)).collect(); System.out.println("wordCountsWithGroupByKey: " + wordCountsWithGroupByKey); " Iterables.size(intIterable)? – Aditya Verma Jun 15 '20 at 20:37
15

Your code will give you an exception when you reach the end of the iterator. You could do:

int i = 0;
while(iterator.hasNext()) {
    i++;
    iterator.next();
}

If you had access to the underlying collection, you would be able to call coll.size()...

EDIT OK you have amended...

2
  • how efficient is this? what if the iterator is like a million values? – Micro Oct 14 '18 at 0:08
  • 4
    @Micro technically an iterator could be infinite - in which case the loop will go on forever. – assylias Oct 16 '18 at 17:40
12

You will always have to iterate. Yet you can use Java 8, 9 to do the counting without looping explicitely:

Iterable<Integer> newIterable = () -> iter;
long count = StreamSupport.stream(newIterable.spliterator(), false).count();

Here is a test:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    Iterator<Integer> iter = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).iterator();
    Iterable<Integer> newIterable = () -> iter;
    long count = StreamSupport.stream(newIterable.spliterator(), false).count();
    System.out.println(count);
}

This prints:

5

Interesting enough you can parallelize the count operation here by changing the parallel flag on this call:

long count = StreamSupport.stream(newIterable.spliterator(), *true*).count();
8

Using Guava library, another option is to convert the Iterable to a List.

List list = Lists.newArrayList(some_iterator);
int count = list.size();

Use this if you need also to access the elements of the iterator after getting its size. By using Iterators.size() you no longer can access the iterated elements.

2
  • 2
    @LoveToCode Less efficient than the example on the original question – Winter Dec 20 '16 at 17:44
  • 2
    Sure, creating a new object with all the elements is slower than just iterating and discarding. IMHO, this solution is a one-liner that improves the code readability. I use it a lot for collections with few elements (up to 1000) or when speed is not an issue. – tashuhka Dec 21 '16 at 10:05
7

If all you have is the iterator, then no, there is no "better" way. If the iterator comes from a collection you could as that for size.

Keep in mind that Iterator is just an interface for traversing distinct values, you would very well have code such as this

    new Iterator<Long>() {
        final Random r = new Random();
        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public Long next() {
            return r.nextLong();
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not implemented");
        }
    };

or

    new Iterator<BigInteger>() {
        BigInteger next = BigInteger.ZERO;

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public BigInteger next() {
            BigInteger current = next;
            next = next.add(BigInteger.ONE);
            return current;
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not implemented");
        }
    }; 
4

There is no more efficient way, if all you have is the iterator. And if the iterator can only be used once, then getting the count before you get the iterator's contents is ... problematic.

The solution is either to change your application so that it doesn't need the count, or to obtain the count by some other means. (For example, pass a Collection rather than Iterator ...)

0

for Java 8 you could use,

public static int getIteratorSize(Iterator iterator){
        AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);
        iterator.forEachRemaining(element -> {
            count.incrementAndGet();
        });
        return count.get();
    }
-6

iterator object contains the same number of elements what your collection contained.

List<E> a =...;
Iterator<E> i = a.iterator();
int size = a.size();//Because iterators size is equal to list a's size.

But instead of getting the size of iterator and iterating through index 0 to that size, it is better to iterate through the method next() of the iterator.

1
  • 1
    What if we don't have a, but only i? – Tvde1 Sep 25 '17 at 8:47

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