16

I'm writing some mathematical code in Python and using Sphinx to produce the documentation. I know that Sphinx can handle LaTeX code in Python docstrings; see https://www.sphinx-doc.org/en/master/usage/extensions/math.html#module-sphinx.ext.mathbase. How can I create LaTeX macros, such as \newcommand{\cG}{\mathcal{G}}, to use in the Python docstrings?

6 Answers 6

8

If you are using MathJax, here's a possible solution. I'm still looking for a nicer solution, but it might help if you need a quick hack.

  1. Create a file under the directory specified in the html_static_path configuration option (typically _static), say mathconf.js. This will contain the JS configuration for MathJax. For instance (from the MathJax documentation):

    MathJax.Hub.Config({
      TeX: {
        Macros: {
          RR: '{\\bf R}',
          bold: ['{\\bf #1}', 1]
        }
      }
    });
    

    You can add more commands following the syntax above. The contents shown define the macros \RR and \bold{#1}, this last one accepting one argument.

  2. Add a layout.html file at the _templates directory. The idea is to extend the current theme, so it searches the previous MathJax configuration file. Thus, the contents are:

    {% extends "!layout.html" %}
    {% set script_files = script_files + ["_static/mathconf.js"] %}
    

    Note that in this case it is the _static directory, because in this case it refers to where to search after the build. Sphinx will have moved the file from html_static_path to the _static directory under the build directory.

1
  • Didn't work for me (sphinx=1.3.1) probably because I can't set the script type correctly to <script type="text/x-mathjax-config"> src="_static/mathconf.js"></script> (see docs.mathjax.org/en/latest/…).
    – user511
    Commented Feb 28, 2018 at 11:36
6

Aha, i found a solution that works with the Sphinx pngmath extension. It's the trick that Sage (open source mathematics software) uses; inspiration from http://www.sagemath.org/doc/reference/sage/misc/latex_macros.html.

To add your own Latex macros to a Sphinx document:

1) Make a file, say 'latex_macros.sty', containing your macros (one per line), and put it in, say, the same directory as your Sphinx conf.py file;

2) Add the following code to your Sphinx conf.py file:

# Additional stuff for the LaTeX preamble.
latex_elements['preamble'] = '\usepackage{amsmath}\n\usepackage{amssymb}\n'

#####################################################
# add LaTeX macros 

f = file('latex_macros.sty')

try:
    pngmath_latex_preamble  # check whether this is already defined
except NameError:
    pngmath_latex_preamble = ""

for macro in f:
    # used when building latex and pdf versions
    latex_elements['preamble'] += macro + '\n'
    # used when building html version
    pngmath_latex_preamble += macro + '\n'

#####################################################
2

To add to @Keta's answer since Aug 2018 and this commit (https://github.com/sphinx-doc/sphinx/pull/5230/files) you can use mathjax_config in the conf.py according to the documentation (http://www.sphinx-doc.org/en/master/usage/extensions/math.html?#confval-mathjax_config)

So for example the following can be added,

mathjax_config = {                  
    "TeX": {                        
        "Macros": {                 
            "RR": '{\\bf R}',       
            "bold": ['{\\bf #1}',1] 
            }                       
        }                           
    }                               
1

If you're using the pngmath extension, you can put that in the preamble by inserting this into the conf.py script:

pngmath_latex_preamble = r"\newcommand{\cG}{\mathcal{G}}"
1

The proposed solution tested on sphinx-doc 2.4.3 (e.g., sphinx-quickstart --version)

Sphinx-doc allows additional tweak with MathJax through mathjax_config. The end goal is we want to implement the following in conf.py:

mathjax_config = {
    'TeX': {
        'Macros': {
            # Math notation
            "Z": "\\mathbb{Z}",                                    # set of integers
            # MoA notations
            "minus": "{}^{\\boldsymbol{\\mbox{-}}\\!}",            # scalar negation operator
        }
   }
}

We can do so manually like above. However, we can do better by automatically populate mathjax_config via parsing a separate .tex file that contains all the macro commands.

For example, I have mathsymbols.tex sits in the same level as conf.py with content looks like below:

\DeclareRobustCommand{\ojoin}{\rule[-0.12ex]{.3em}{.4pt}\llap{\rule[1.2ex]{.3em}{.4pt}}}
\newcommand{\leftouterjoin}{\mathrel{\ojoin\mkern-6.5mu\Join}}
\newcommand{\rightouterjoin}{\mathrel{\Join\mkern-6.5mu\ojoin}}
\newcommand{\fullouterjoin}{\mathrel{\ojoin\mkern-6.5mu\Join\mkern-6.5mu\ojoin}}

Then, inside conf.py, we can write:

mathjax_config = { 'TeX': {'Macros': {}}}

with open('mathsymbols.tex', 'r') as f:
    for line in f:
        macros = re.findall(r'\\(DeclareRobustCommand|newcommand){\\(.*?)}(\[(\d)\])?{(.+)}', line)
        for macro in macros:
            if len(macro[2]) == 0:
                mathjax_config['TeX']['Macros'][macro[1]] = "{"+macro[4]+"}"
            else:
                mathjax_config['TeX']['Macros'][macro[1]] = ["{"+macro[4]+"}", int(macro[3])]

to automatically populate mathjax_config and we're done.

With the above example, we can use \leftouterjoin LaTeX macro inside sphinx-doc.

2
  • 2
    This answer is great! however, I needed the following modifications to make it work for me: (1) change mathjax_config to mathjax3_config; (2) lowercase the config dict keys: {'tex': {'macros': {}}}. In addition, I also added renewcommand to the regex.
    – avivr
    Commented Jan 5, 2022 at 22:54
  • 1
    Thank you so much for the great modifications for mathjax!
    – BeiHerta
    Commented Mar 8, 2022 at 17:55
0

If HTML+MathJax is the only output format, the following works in plain Docutils out-of-the-box:

.. math:: \newcommand{\half}{\frac{1}{2}}
          0.5 = \half

With MathJax, we can use the macro later: :math:`\half+\half=1`.

With LaTeX, the \newcommand definition is local to the first equation.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.