408

My code is as below

public CountryStandards()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    try
    {
        FillPageControls();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Country Standards", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Fills the page controls.
/// </summary>
private void FillPageControls()
{
    popUpProgressBar.IsOpen = true;
    lblProgress.Content = "Loading. Please wait...";
    progress.IsIndeterminate = true;
    worker = new BackgroundWorker();
    worker.DoWork += new System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventHandler(worker_DoWork);
    worker.ProgressChanged += new System.ComponentModel.ProgressChangedEventHandler(worker_ProgressChanged);
    worker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    worker.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(worker_RunWorkerCompleted);
    worker.RunWorkerAsync();                    
}

private void worker_DoWork(object sender, System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    GetGridData(null, 0); // filling grid
}

private void worker_ProgressChanged(object sender, System.ComponentModel.ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    progress.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
}

private void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    worker = null;
    popUpProgressBar.IsOpen = false;
    //filling Region dropdown
    Standards.UDMCountryStandards objUDMCountryStandards = new Standards.UDMCountryStandards();
    objUDMCountryStandards.Operation = "SELECT_REGION";
    DataSet dsRegionStandards = objStandardsBusinessLayer.GetCountryStandards(objUDMCountryStandards);
    if (!StandardsDefault.IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(dsRegionStandards, 0))
        StandardsDefault.FillComboBox(cmbRegion, dsRegionStandards.Tables[0], "Region", "RegionId");

    //filling Currency dropdown
    objUDMCountryStandards = new Standards.UDMCountryStandards();
    objUDMCountryStandards.Operation = "SELECT_CURRENCY";
    DataSet dsCurrencyStandards = objStandardsBusinessLayer.GetCountryStandards(objUDMCountryStandards);
    if (!StandardsDefault.IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(dsCurrencyStandards, 0))
        StandardsDefault.FillComboBox(cmbCurrency, dsCurrencyStandards.Tables[0], "CurrencyName", "CurrencyId");

    if (Users.UserRole != "Admin")
        btnSave.IsEnabled = false;

}

/// <summary>
/// Gets the grid data.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sender">The sender.</param>
/// <param name="pageIndex">Index of the page.( used in case of paging)   </pamam>
private void GetGridData(object sender, int pageIndex)
{
    Standards.UDMCountryStandards objUDMCountryStandards = new Standards.UDMCountryStandards();
    objUDMCountryStandards.Operation = "SELECT";
    objUDMCountryStandards.Country = txtSearchCountry.Text.Trim() != string.Empty ? txtSearchCountry.Text : null;
    DataSet dsCountryStandards = objStandardsBusinessLayer.GetCountryStandards(objUDMCountryStandards);
    if (!StandardsDefault.IsNullOrEmptyDataTable(dsCountryStandards, 0) && (chkbxMarketsSearch.IsChecked == true || chkbxBudgetsSearch.IsChecked == true || chkbxProgramsSearch.IsChecked == true))
    {
        DataTable objDataTable = StandardsDefault.FilterDatatableForModules(dsCountryStandards.Tables[0], "Country", chkbxMarketsSearch, chkbxBudgetsSearch, chkbxProgramsSearch);
        dgCountryList.ItemsSource = objDataTable.DefaultView;
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox.Show("No Records Found", "Country Standards", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Information);
        btnClear_Click(null, null);
    }
}

The step objUDMCountryStandards.Country = txtSearchCountry.Text.Trim() != string.Empty ? txtSearchCountry.Text : null; in get grid data throws exception

The calling thread cannot access this object because a different thread owns it.

What's wrong here?

1

14 Answers 14

819

This is a common problem with people getting started. Whenever you update your UI elements from a thread other than the main thread, you need to use:

this.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
{
    ...// your code here.
});

You can also use control.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() to check whether the current thread owns the control. If it does own it, your code looks as normal. Otherwise, use above pattern.

12
  • 3
    I have the same problem as OP; My problem now is that the event causes now a stack overflow. :\
    – Malavos
    Jan 22, 2014 at 12:14
  • 2
    Went back to my old project and solved this. Also, I had forgotten to +1 this. This method works quite well! It improve my application loading time on 10seconds or even more, just by using threads to load our localized resources. Cheers!
    – Malavos
    May 7, 2014 at 13:21
  • 4
    If I'm not wrong you can't even read a UI object from a non-owner thread; surprised me a bit.
    – Elliot
    Mar 2, 2015 at 9:25
  • 47
    Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(MyMethod, DispatcherPriority.ContextIdle); to get the dispatcher if not on the UI thread as per this answer Aug 21, 2015 at 2:59
  • 4
    +1. Ha! I used this for some WPF hackery to keep things decoupled. I was in a static context so I couldn't use this.Dispatcher.Invoke.... instead... myControl.Dispatcher.Invoke :) I needed to return an object back so I did myControlDispatcher.Invoke<object>(() => myControl.DataContext);
    – C. Tewalt
    Feb 14, 2016 at 7:20
52

To add my 2 cents, the exception can occur even if you call your code through System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.Invoke().
The point is that you have to call Invoke() of the Dispatcher of the control that you're trying to access, which in some cases may not be the same as System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher. So instead you should use YourControl.Dispatcher.Invoke() to be safe. I was banging my head for a couple of hours before I realized this.

Update

For future readers, it looks like this has changed in the newer versions of .NET (4.0 and above). Now you no longer have to worry about the correct dispatcher when updating UI-backing properties in your VM. WPF engine will marshal cross-thread calls on the correct UI thread. See more details here. Thanks to @aaronburro for the info and link. You may also want to read our conversation below in comments.

20
  • 4
    @l33t: WPF supports multiple UI threads in one application, each of which will have its own Dispatcher. In those cases (which are admittedly rare), calling Control.Dispatcher is the safe approach. For reference you can see this article as well as this SO post (particularly Squidward's answer).
    – dotNET
    Sep 27, 2016 at 10:13
  • 1
    Interestingly, I was facing this very exception when I googled and landed on this page and like most of us do, tried the highest voted answer, which didn't solve my issue then. I then found out this reason and posted it here for peer developers.
    – dotNET
    Sep 27, 2016 at 10:15
  • 1
    @l33t, if you are using MVVM correctly, then it shouldn't be a problem. The view necessarily know what Dispatcher it is using, whilehe ViewModels and Models know nothing of controls and have no need to know of controls.
    – aaronburro
    Feb 23, 2018 at 14:54
  • 2
    @aaronburro: Problem is that VM may want to launch actions on alternate threads (e.g. Tasks, Timer-based actions, Parallel queries), and as the operation progresses, may like to update UI (through RaisePropertyChanged etc), which will in turn try to access a UI control from non-UI thread and thus result in this exception. I don't know of a correct MVVM approach that would solve this problem.
    – dotNET
    Feb 24, 2018 at 8:39
  • 1
    The WPF binding engine automatically marshals property change events to the correct Dispatcher. This is why VM has no need to know of the Dispatcher; all it has to do is just raise property changed events. WinForms binding is a different story.
    – aaronburro
    Aug 17, 2018 at 20:31
41

If you encounter this problem and UI Controls were created on a separate worker thread when working with BitmapSource or ImageSource in WPF, call Freeze() method first before passing the BitmapSource or ImageSource as a parameter to any method. Using Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke() does not work in such instances

3
31

this happened with me because I tried to access UI component in another thread insted of UI thread

like this

private void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    new Thread(SyncProcces).Start();
}

private void SyncProcces()
{
    string val1 = null, val2 = null;
    //here is the problem 
    val1 = textBox1.Text;//access UI in another thread
    val2 = textBox2.Text;//access UI in another thread
    localStore = new LocalStore(val1);
    remoteStore = new RemoteStore(val2);
}

to solve this problem, wrap any ui call inside what Candide mentioned above in his answer

private void SyncProcces()
{
    string val1 = null, val2 = null;
    this.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
    {//this refer to form in WPF application 
        val1 = textBox.Text;
        val2 = textBox_Copy.Text;
    }));
    localStore = new LocalStore(val1);
    remoteStore = new RemoteStore(val2 );
}
2
  • 2
    Upvoted, because this is not a duplicate answer or plagiaristic, but it instead provides a good example that other answers were lacking, while giving credit for what was posted earlier. Sep 2, 2016 at 15:24
  • Upvote is for a clear answer. Although same was written by others, but this make it clear for anyone who is stuck.
    – NishantM
    Mar 4, 2017 at 7:11
17

You need to do it on the UI thread. Use:

Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => {GetGridData(null, 0)})); 
15

For some reason Candide's answer didn't build. It was helpful, though, as it led me to find this, which worked perfectly:

System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
{
   //your code here...
}));
2
  • It's possible that you didn't call from the form's class. Either you can grab a reference to the Window, or you can probably use what you suggested.
    – Simone
    Nov 12, 2015 at 11:05
  • 8
    If it worked for you, it was unnecessary to use it in the first place. System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher is the dispatcher for the current thread. That means if you're on a background thread, it's not going to be the UI thread's dispatcher. To access the UI thread's dispatcher, use System.Windows.Application.Current.Dispatcher.
    – user1228
    Sep 1, 2017 at 14:46
5

As mentioned here, Dispatcher.Invoke could freeze the UI. Should use Dispatcher.BeginInvoke instead.

Here is a handy extension class to simplify the checking and calling dispatcher invocation.

Sample usage: (call from WPF window)

this Dispatcher.InvokeIfRequired(new Action(() =>
{
    logTextbox.AppendText(message);
    logTextbox.ScrollToEnd();
}));

Extension class:

using System;
using System.Windows.Threading;

namespace WpfUtility
{
    public static class DispatcherExtension
    {
        public static void InvokeIfRequired(this Dispatcher dispatcher, Action action)
        {
            if (dispatcher == null)
            {
                return;
            }
            if (!dispatcher.CheckAccess())
            {
                dispatcher.BeginInvoke(action, DispatcherPriority.ContextIdle);
                return;
            }
            action();
        }
    }
}
5

This works for me.

new Thread(() =>
        {

        Thread.CurrentThread.IsBackground = false;
        Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, (SendOrPostCallback)delegate {

          //Your Code here.

        }, null);
        }).Start();
1
  • This code will freeze the UI.
    – abdou93
    Jun 28 at 10:20
4

I also found that System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.Invoke() is not always dispatcher of target control, just as dotNet wrote in his answer. I didn't had access to control's own dispatcher, so I used Application.Current.Dispatcher and it solved the problem.

3

The problem is that you are calling GetGridData from a background thread. This method accesses several WPF controls which are bound to the main thread. Any attempt to access them from a background thread will lead to this error.

In order to get back to the correct thread you should use SynchronizationContext.Current.Post. However in this particular case it seems like the majority of the work you are doing is UI based. Hence you would be creating a background thread just to go immediately back to the UI thread and do some work. You need to refactor your code a bit so that it can do the expensive work on the background thread and then post the new data to the UI thread afterwards

3

There are definitely different ways to do this depending on your needs.

One way I use a UI-updating thread (that's not the main UI thread) is to have the thread start a loop where the entire logical processing loop is invoked onto the UI thread.

Example:

public SomeFunction()
{
    bool working = true;
    Thread t = new Thread(() =>
    {
        // Don't put the working bool in here, otherwise it will 
        // belong to the new thread and not the main UI thread.
        while (working)
        {
            Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
            {
                // Put your entire logic code in here.
                // All of this code will process on the main UI thread because
                //  of the Invoke.
                // By doing it this way, you don't have to worry about Invoking individual
                //  elements as they are needed.
            });
        }
    });
}

With this, code executes entirely on main UI thread. This can be a pro for amateur programmers that have difficulty wrapping their heads around cross-threaded operations. However, it can easily become a con with more complex UIs (especially if performing animations). Really, this is only to fake a system of updating the UI and then returning to handle any events that have fired in lieu of efficient cross-threading operations.

0

Also, another solution is ensuring your controls are created in UI thread, not by a background worker thread for example.

0

I kept getting the error when I added cascading comboboxes to my WPF application, and resolved the error by using this API:

    using System.Windows.Data;

    private readonly object _lock = new object();
    private CustomObservableCollection<string> _myUiBoundProperty;
    public CustomObservableCollection<string> MyUiBoundProperty
    {
        get { return _myUiBoundProperty; }
        set
        {
            if (value == _myUiBoundProperty) return;
            _myUiBoundProperty = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged(nameof(MyUiBoundProperty));
        }
    }

    public MyViewModelCtor(INavigationService navigationService) 
    {
       // Other code...
       BindingOperations.EnableCollectionSynchronization(AvailableDefectSubCategories, _lock );

    }

For details, please see https://msdn.microsoft.com/query/dev14.query?appId=Dev14IDEF1&l=EN-US&k=k(System.Windows.Data.BindingOperations.EnableCollectionSynchronization);k(TargetFrameworkMoniker-.NETFramework,Version%3Dv4.7);k(DevLang-csharp)&rd=true

0

Sometimes it can be the object you created that throws the exception, not the target where I was obviously looking at.

In my code here:

xaml file:

<Grid Margin="0,0,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" >
    <TextBlock x:Name="tbScreenLog" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" Background="Black" FontSize="12" Foreground="#FF919191" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"/>
</Grid>

xaml.cs file:

System.Windows.Documents.Run rnLine = new System.Windows.Documents.Run(Message.Item2 + "\r\n");
rnLine.Foreground = LineAlternate ? Brushes.Green : Brushes.Orange;

Dispatcher.Invoke(()=> {
    tbScreenLog.Inlines.Add(rnLine);
});
LineAlternate = !LineAlternate;

I got the exception about accessing an object from a different thread but I was invoking it on the UI thread??

After a while it daunted on me that it was not about the TextBlock object but about the Run object I created before invoking.

Changing the code to this solved my problem:

Dispatcher.Invoke(()=> {
    Run rnLine = new Run(Message.Item2 + "\r\n");
    rnLine.Foreground = LineAlternate ? Brushes.Green : Brushes.Orange;
    tbScreenLog.Inlines.Add(rnLine);
});
LineAlternate = !LineAlternate;
4
  • 1
    Run is not a suitable name for a class or struct IMHO. What does it do? Can you include the code? Jun 6, 2021 at 16:17
  • @TheodorZoulias I agree that would not be a very wise name for a custom class although totally legal. Run is System.Windows.Documents.Run a standard WPF class. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… I don't have the code :) Jun 7, 2021 at 17:28
  • Ah, OK. Thanks for clarifying it! Jun 7, 2021 at 17:33
  • Thanks for pointing out this could be more clear Jun 7, 2021 at 17:34

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