I'm looking for a way to find all controls on Window by their type,

for example: find all TextBoxes, find all controls implementing specific interface etc.

15 Answers 15

up vote 385 down vote accepted

This should do the trick

public static IEnumerable<T> FindVisualChildren<T>(DependencyObject depObj) where T : DependencyObject
{
    if (depObj != null)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(depObj); i++)
        {
            DependencyObject child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(depObj, i);
            if (child != null && child is T)
            {
                yield return (T)child;
            }

            foreach (T childOfChild in FindVisualChildren<T>(child))
            {
                yield return childOfChild;
            }
        }
    }
}

then you enumerate over the controls like so

foreach (TextBlock tb in FindVisualChildren<TextBlock>(window))
{
    // do something with tb here
}
  • 65
    Note: If you're trying to get this to work and finding that your Window (for instance) has 0 visual children, try running this method in the Loaded event handler. If you run it in the constructor (even after InitializeComponent()), the visual children aren't loaded yet, and it won't work. – Ryan Lundy Aug 28 '09 at 15:02
  • 22
    Switching from VisualTreeHelper to LogicalTreeHelpers will cause invisible elements to be included too. – Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Jun 4 '12 at 5:47
  • 11
    Isn't the line "child != null && child is T" redundant? Should it not just read "child is T" – noonand May 16 '13 at 18:10
  • 1
    I would turn it into an extension method with just insering a this before DependencyObject => this DependencyObject depObj – Johannes Wanzek Oct 7 '14 at 5:25
  • 1
    @JohannesWanzek Don't forget you would also need to change the bit where you call it on the child : foreach(ChildofChild.FindVisualChildren<T>()){bla bla bla} – Will Dec 22 '14 at 1:54

This is the easiest way:

IEnumerable<myType> collection = control.Children.OfType<myType>(); 

where control is the root element of the window.

  • what do you mean "root element" ? What should I write to connect with my mainwindow form? – deadfish Dec 30 '11 at 16:02
  • I get it, in xaml view I had to set name for grid <Grid Name="Anata_wa_yoru_o_shihai_suru_ai">here buttons</Grid> and then I could use Anata_wa_yoru_o_shihai_suru_ai.Children.OfType<myType>(); – deadfish Dec 30 '11 at 16:41
  • The best and shortest solution, just in one line! – Pnct Apr 18 '13 at 8:42
  • 59
    This does not answer the question that was asked. It only returns child controls one level deep. – Jim May 6 '13 at 19:43

I adapted @Bryce Kahle's answer to follow @Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen's suggestion and use LogicalTreeHelper.

Seems to work okay. ;)

    public static IEnumerable<T> FindLogicalChildren<T> ( DependencyObject depObj ) where T : DependencyObject {
        if( depObj != null ) {
            foreach( object rawChild in LogicalTreeHelper.GetChildren( depObj ) ){
                if( rawChild is DependencyObject ) {
                    DependencyObject child = (DependencyObject)rawChild;
                    if( child is T ) {
                        yield return (T)child;
                    }

                    foreach( T childOfChild in FindLogicalChildren<T>( child ) ) {
                        yield return childOfChild;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

(It still won't check tab controls or Grids inside GroupBoxes as mentioned by @Benjamin Berry & @David R respectively.) (Also followed @noonand's suggestion & removed the redundant child != null)

  • been looking for a while how to clear all my text boxes, I have multiple tabs and this is the only code that worked:) thanks – JohnChris Jan 12 '17 at 14:28

Use the helper classes VisualTreeHelper or LogicalTreeHelper depending on which tree you're interested in. They both provide methods for getting the children of an element (although the syntax differs a little). I often use these classes for finding the first occurrence of a specific type, but you could easily modify it to find all objects of that type:

public static DependencyObject FindInVisualTreeDown(DependencyObject obj, Type type)
{
    if (obj != null)
    {
        if (obj.GetType() == type)
        {
            return obj;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(obj); i++)
        {
            DependencyObject childReturn = FindInVisualTreeDown(VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(obj, i), type);
            if (childReturn != null)
            {
                return childReturn;
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}
  • +1 for explanation and post but Bryce Kahle posted function that fully works Thanks – Andrija Cacanovic Jun 10 '09 at 23:18
  • This does not fix the issue of the question, and also the answer with the generic type is much clearer. Combining it with the use of VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(obj) will fix the issue. However is useful to be considered as an option. – Vasil Popov Oct 7 '15 at 12:38

I found that the line, VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(depObj);, used in several examples above does not return a non-zero count for GroupBoxes, in particular, where the GroupBox contains a Grid, and the Grid contains children elements. I believe this may be because the GroupBox is not allowed to contain more than one child, and this is stored in its Content property. There is no GroupBox.Children type of property. I am sure I did not do this very efficiently, but I modified the first "FindVisualChildren" example in this chain as follows:

    public IEnumerable<T> FindVisualChildren<T>(DependencyObject depObj) where T : DependencyObject 
    { 
        if (depObj != null) 
        {
            int depObjCount = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(depObj); 
            for (int i = 0; i <depObjCount; i++) 
            { 
                DependencyObject child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(depObj, i); 
                if (child != null && child is T) 
                { 
                    yield return (T)child; 
                }

                if (child is GroupBox)
                {
                    GroupBox gb = child as GroupBox;
                    Object gpchild = gb.Content;
                    if (gpchild is T)
                    {
                        yield return (T)child; 
                        child = gpchild as T;
                    }
                }

                foreach (T childOfChild in FindVisualChildren<T>(child)) 
                { 
                    yield return childOfChild; 
                } 
            }
        }
    } 

To get a list of all childs of a specific type you can use:

private static IEnumerable<DependencyObject> FindInVisualTreeDown(DependencyObject obj, Type type)
{
    if (obj != null)
    {
        if (obj.GetType() == type)
        {
            yield return obj;
        }

        for (var i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(obj); i++)
        {
            foreach (var child in FindInVisualTreeDown(VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(obj, i), type))
            {
                if (child != null)
                {
                    yield return child;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    yield break;
}

Small change to the recursion to so you can for example find the child tab control of a tab control.

    public static DependencyObject FindInVisualTreeDown(DependencyObject obj, Type type)
    {
        if (obj != null)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(obj); i++)
            {
                DependencyObject child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(obj, i);

                if (child.GetType() == type)
                {
                    return child;
                }

                DependencyObject childReturn = FindInVisualTreeDown(child, type);
                if (childReturn != null)
                {
                    return childReturn;
                }
            }
        }

        return null;
    }

And this is how it works upwards

    private T FindParent<T>(DependencyObject item, Type StopAt) where T : class
    {
        if (item is T)
        {
            return item as T;
        }
        else
        {
            DependencyObject _parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(item);
            if (_parent == null)
            {
                return default(T);
            }
            else
            {
                Type _type = _parent.GetType();
                if (StopAt != null)
                {
                    if ((_type.IsSubclassOf(StopAt) == true) || (_type == StopAt))
                    {
                        return null;
                    }
                }

                if ((_type.IsSubclassOf(typeof(T)) == true) || (_type == typeof(T)))
                {
                    return _parent as T;
                }
                else
                {
                    return FindParent<T>(_parent, StopAt);
                }
            }
        }
    }

Do note that using the VisualTreeHelper does only work on controls that derive from Visual or Visual3D. If you also need to inspect other elements (e.g. TextBlock, FlowDocument etc.), using VisualTreeHelper will throw an exception.

Here's an alternative that falls back to the logical tree if necessary:

http://www.hardcodet.net/2009/06/finding-elements-in-wpf-tree-both-ways

Here is yet another, compact version, with the generics syntax:

    public static IEnumerable<T> FindLogicalChildren<T>(DependencyObject obj) where T : DependencyObject
    {
        if (obj != null) {
            if (obj is T)
                yield return obj as T;

            foreach (DependencyObject child in LogicalTreeHelper.GetChildren(obj).OfType<DependencyObject>()) 
                foreach (T c in FindLogicalChildren<T>(child)) 
                    yield return c;
        }
    }

I wanted to add a comment but I have less than 50 pts so I can only "Answer". Be aware that if you use the "VisualTreeHelper" method to retrieve XAML "TextBlock" objects then it will also grab XAML "Button" objects. If you re-initialize the "TextBlock" object by writing to the Textblock.Text parameter then you will no longer be able to change the Button text using the Button.Content parameter. The Button will permanently show the text written to it from the Textblock.Text write action (from when it was retrieved --

foreach (TextBlock tb in FindVisualChildren<TextBlock>(window))
{
// do something with tb here
   tb.Text = ""; //this will overwrite Button.Content and render the 
                 //Button.Content{set} permanently disabled.
}

To work around this, you can try using a XAML "TextBox" and add methods (or Events) to mimic a XAMAL Button. XAML "TextBox" is not gathered by a search for "TextBlock".

My version for C++/CLI

template < class T, class U >
bool Isinst(U u) 
{
    return dynamic_cast< T >(u) != nullptr;
}

template <typename T>
    T FindVisualChildByType(Windows::UI::Xaml::DependencyObject^ element, Platform::String^ name)
    {
        if (Isinst<T>(element) && dynamic_cast<Windows::UI::Xaml::FrameworkElement^>(element)->Name == name)
        {
            return dynamic_cast<T>(element);
        }
        int childcount = Windows::UI::Xaml::Media::VisualTreeHelper::GetChildrenCount(element);
        for (int i = 0; i < childcount; ++i)
        {
            auto childElement = FindVisualChildByType<T>(Windows::UI::Xaml::Media::VisualTreeHelper::GetChild(element, i), name);
            if (childElement != nullptr)
            {
                return childElement;
            }
        }
        return nullptr;
    };

For some reason, none of the answers posted here helped me to get all controls of given type contained in a given control in my MainWindow. I needed to find all menu items in one menu to iterate them. They were not all direct descendants of the menu, so i managed to collect only the first lilne of them using any of the code above. This extension method is my solution for the problem for anyone who will continue to read all the way down here.

public static void FindVisualChildren<T>(this ICollection<T> children, DependencyObject depObj) where T : DependencyObject
    {
        if (depObj != null)
        {
            var brethren = LogicalTreeHelper.GetChildren(depObj);
            var brethrenOfType = LogicalTreeHelper.GetChildren(depObj).OfType<T>();
            foreach (var childOfType in brethrenOfType)
            {
                children.Add(childOfType);
            }

            foreach (var rawChild in brethren)
            {
                if (rawChild is DependencyObject)
                {
                    var child = rawChild as DependencyObject;
                    FindVisualChildren<T>(children, child);
                }
            }
        }
    }

Hope it helps.

Really nice answer.

VB.NET version:

Public Shared Iterator Function FindVisualChildren(Of T As DependencyObject)(depObj As DependencyObject) As IEnumerable(Of T)
    If depObj IsNot Nothing Then
        For i As Integer = 0 To VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(depObj) - 1
            Dim child As DependencyObject = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(depObj, i)
            If child IsNot Nothing AndAlso TypeOf child Is T Then
                Yield DirectCast(child, T)
            End If
            For Each childOfChild As T In FindVisualChildren(Of T)(child)
                Yield childOfChild
            Next
        Next
    End If
End Function

Usage (this disables all TextBoxes in a window):

        For Each tb As TextBox In FindVisualChildren(Of TextBox)(Me)
          tb.IsEnabled = False
        Next

I found it easier without Visual Tree Helpers:

foreach (UIElement element in MainWindow.Children) {
    if (element is TextBox) { 
        if ((element as TextBox).Text != "")
        {
            //Do something
        }
    }
};
  • 3
    This goes only one level deep. in XAML you have deeply nested controls. – SQLGeorge Mar 28 '16 at 13:18

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