33

Everytime I attach to a process using gdb, it will stop the target program, and I need to type 'cont' to let it go. Is there a way to attach to a process without stopping it? This makes things easier if the process will behave differently if it stops for a while.

2
  • Why would you attach and continue immediately? My use case has been attach > Set a breakpoint > continue. Jun 17, 2020 at 10:48
  • @talekeDskobeDa You attach and continue immediately to catch a crash in the debugger. In this case, there is no need for a breakpoint, and stopping the program can have side effects. Mar 8, 2023 at 21:49

4 Answers 4

48

I know there is already a fine answer for this, but I prefer not using an additional file.

Here is another answer:

gdb attach $(pidof process_name) -ex cont
1
  • 1
    I had to disable pagination, because on attach there were too many threads, and gdb did not perform 'continue' before user intervention: gdb -iex "set pagination off" -q -ex cont -p $PID
    – Alex Cohn
    Apr 27, 2022 at 14:19
15

You can't make it not stop. You can however instantly continue... Create a simple batch script which will attach to a specific process and instantly continuing execution after attaching:

gdb attach $1 -x <(echo "cont")

./attach PID

3

For when you don't know the PID of the process...

gdb attach $(pgrep -f myApp) -ex cont
1

Here is a unified command for recent versions of GDB that include debuginfod support (also see a related question). Without this additional step, it was still hanging my remote terminal, which was hard to detect while I was attempting to debug a window-manager issue. In this example, <BINARY-NAME> is the process binary name, in case you don't know/don't want to find the PID.

echo 'set debuginfod enabled on' >> ~/.gdbinit
gdb -iex "set pagination off" -q -ex cont -p $(pidof <BINARY-NAME>)
1
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