9

While reading the following performance test, I noticed the author used $(0) and $(1). What is the purpose of this?

http://jsperf.com/scriptjunkie-premature-3

var $a = $(0);

function fn_1() {
 var $a = $(this);
 if ($a.attr("rel") == "foo") {
  $a.addClass("foo");
 }
 else {
  $a.addClass("other");
 }
}

function fn_2() {
 $a.context = $a[0] = this; // fake the collection object
 if ($a.attr("rel") == "foo") {
  $a.addClass("foo");
 }
 else {
  $a.addClass("other");
 }
}
3
  • Whatever this behavior is, it's undocumented. $(0) => [] and $(1) => [1] (and $(2) => [2]), but I have no idea why :/ – Matchu Mar 18 '12 at 2:20
  • 2
    Have you read the article this test links to? – Felix Kling Mar 18 '12 at 2:32
  • Thanks @FelixKling, I didn't notice there is a link ! I was first reading this =] – Ton Mar 19 '12 at 3:31
1

If you look at the jQuery source code, you can see that init is called when $() is executed. This function contains several if statements to handle various pieces of information passed as the selector. At the end of the function the following is called:

return jQuery.makeArray( selector, this );

If a number such as 1 or 2 is passed, the call to makeArray will just convert it to an array such as [1], [2], etc. So there is nothing particularly special about $(1).

1
  • So what is the purpose of it...? Why not $a = $() or $a = $(true) or $a = [1]? – user166390 Mar 18 '12 at 4:08

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