3

If I have a class Product:

public class Product
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Make { get; set; }
    public Decimal Price { get; set; } //(Edit) - Added non-string
}

And I have a property in another class declared as:

Func<Product, object> SortBy { get; set; }

I can set SortBy using:

SortBy = p => p.Title;

But how would I, using reflection, make the same assignment if I had the property name for SortBy stored as a string e.g.

string sortField = "Title";

SortBy = /*Some reflection using sortField*/;
5

You need to use expression trees to create a new method at runtime:

var p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Product));
SortBy = Expression.Lambda<Func<Product, object>>(
    Expression.Property(p, sortField),
    p
).Compile();

To work with value types, you'll need to insert a cast:

var p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Product));
SortBy = Expression.Lambda<Func<Product, object>>( 
    Expression.TypeAs(Expression.Property(p, sortField), typeof(object)), 
    p
).Compile();
  • This works perfectly for Strings but won't work for Decimal, Int etc - I am trying to refactor a bunch of code that previously had the sortBy set up using if statements e.g. if(search == "title") sortBy = p => p.Title; if(search == "price") sortBy = p => p.Price; – Rob Mar 18 '12 at 6:56
  • 1
    I don't think that a lamdba expression provides automatic boxing and unboxing of value types, you'll need to explicitly box the Decimal to an object using Expression.TypeAs: Expression.TypeAs(Expression.Property(p, sortField), typeof(object)). – Luke Forder Mar 18 '12 at 7:56
  • 1
    @Luke Forder - can you give me the full line of code? i.e. SortBy = ... I'm on day 1 of expression trees so I need some hand holding ;-) – Rob Mar 18 '12 at 8:52
  • 2
    I know how it feels :). Building on the above answer: var p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Product)); SortBy = Expression.Lambda<Func<Product, object>>( Expression.TypeAs(Expression.Property(p, sortField), typeof(object)), p).Compile(); – Luke Forder Mar 18 '12 at 9:09
  • 1
    Ladies/Gents we have a winner!! thanks to SLaks and Luke Forder for their help - I'll edit the answer and mark it correct. Thanks everyone! – Rob Mar 18 '12 at 9:20
2

To make it work with decimal and other value types, you can use generics:

static void SetSortBy<T>(string sortField) {
    var m = typeof(Product).GetProperty(sortField).GetGetMethod();
    var d = Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<Product, T>), m) 
            as Func<Product, T>;
    SortBy = product => d(product);
}

...

SetSortBy<decimal>("Price");
SetSortBy<object>("Title"); // or <string>
  • this is ok but it requires that I know the Type in order to call SetSortBy which defeats the purpose of the exercise. – Rob Mar 18 '12 at 8:56
  • @DrRob: Actually, this approach will work for all reference types using object. – SLaks Mar 18 '12 at 15:22
1

The answer is effectively the same as this other SO question/answer on INotifyPropertyChanged by Phil.

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