42

I have this function which formats seconds to time

 function secondsToTime(secs){
    var hours = Math.floor(secs / (60 * 60));
    var divisor_for_minutes = secs % (60 * 60);
    var minutes = Math.floor(divisor_for_minutes / 60);
    var divisor_for_seconds = divisor_for_minutes % 60;
    var seconds = Math.ceil(divisor_for_seconds);
    return minutes + ":" + seconds; 
}

it works great but i need a function to turn milliseconds to time and I cant seem to understand what i need to do to this function to return time in this format

mm:ss.mill
01:28.5568
  • 2
    Lets see here 1 second = 1000ms so... – epascarello Mar 19 '12 at 0:02
  • 1
    As far as I'm concerned 1000 ms's make a second, so how can you have a 4-digit number in the ms area? – inhan Mar 19 '12 at 0:07

15 Answers 15

80

Lots of unnecessary flooring in other answers. If the string is in milliseconds, convert to h:m:s as follows:

function msToTime(s) {
  var ms = s % 1000;
  s = (s - ms) / 1000;
  var secs = s % 60;
  s = (s - secs) / 60;
  var mins = s % 60;
  var hrs = (s - mins) / 60;

  return hrs + ':' + mins + ':' + secs + '.' + ms;
}

If you want it formatted as hh:mm:ss.sss then use:

function msToTime(s) {

  // Pad to 2 or 3 digits, default is 2
  function pad(n, z) {
    z = z || 2;
    return ('00' + n).slice(-z);
  }

  var ms = s % 1000;
  s = (s - ms) / 1000;
  var secs = s % 60;
  s = (s - secs) / 60;
  var mins = s % 60;
  var hrs = (s - mins) / 60;

  return pad(hrs) + ':' + pad(mins) + ':' + pad(secs) + '.' + pad(ms, 3);
}

console.log(msToTime(55018))

Using some recently added language features, the pad function can be more concise:

function msToTime(s) {
    // Pad to 2 or 3 digits, default is 2
  var pad = (n, z = 2) => ('00' + n).slice(-z);
  return pad(s/3.6e6|0) + ':' + pad((s%3.6e6)/6e4 | 0) + ':' + pad((s%6e4)/1000|0) + '.' + pad(s%1000, 3);
}

// Current hh:mm:ss.sss UTC
console.log(msToTime(new Date() % 8.64e7))

  • This algorithm fails when the milliseconds are less than .1, e.g. 55018 should be "55.018" but it yields "55.18" – Joe Germuska Jan 2 '17 at 22:52
  • 1
    @JoeGermuska—hey, thanks for that. ;-) – RobG Jan 3 '17 at 1:10
30

Not to reinvent the wheel, here is my favourite one-liner solution:

/**
 * Convert milliseconds to time string (hh:mm:ss:mss).
 *
 * @param Number ms
 *
 * @return String
 */
function time(ms) {
    return new Date(ms).toISOString().slice(11, -1);
}

console.log( time(12345 * 1000) );  // "03:25:45.000"

Method Date.prototype.toISOString() returns a string in simplified extended ISO format (ISO 8601), which is always 24 characters long: YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.sssZ. This method is supported in all modern browsers (IE9+) and JavaScript engines.


UPDATE: The solution above is always limited to range of one day, which is fine if you use it to format milliseconds up to 24 hours (i.e. ms < 86400000). To make it working with any input value, I have extended it into a nice universal prototype method:

/**
 * Convert (milli)seconds to time string (hh:mm:ss[:mss]).
 *
 * @param Boolean isSec
 *
 * @return String
 */
Number.prototype.toTime = function(isSec) {
    var ms = isSec ? this * 1e3 : this,
        lm = ~(4 * !!isSec),  /* limit fraction */
        fmt = new Date(ms).toISOString().slice(11, lm);

    if (ms >= 8.64e7) {  /* >= 24 hours */
        var parts = fmt.split(/:(?=\d{2}:)/);
        parts[0] -= -24 * (ms / 8.64e7 | 0);
        return parts.join(':');
    }

    return fmt;
};

console.log( (12345 * 1000).toTime()     );  // "03:25:45.000"
console.log( (123456 * 789).toTime()     );  // "27:03:26.784"
console.log(  12345.       .toTime(true) );  // "03:25:45"
console.log(  123456789.   .toTime(true) );  // "34293:33:09"

  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer nowadays. – Alex Sep 16 '16 at 15:37
  • this doesn't seem to work in React Native – Ziarno Jan 23 '17 at 11:43
  • @Ziarno Not sure how React Native works but if it uses modern JS processor on behind, this code should be executed. – VisioN Jan 23 '17 at 12:44
  • hmm you're right, it does work. Must have had a different bug, sorry – Ziarno Jan 24 '17 at 12:32
  • This works for ms less than 24h. Every 24h, hours will start from 0 again. – haiiaaa Mar 31 '17 at 10:48
17
function millisecondsToTime(milli)
{
      var milliseconds = milli % 1000;
      var seconds = Math.floor((milli / 1000) % 60);
      var minutes = Math.floor((milli / (60 * 1000)) % 60);

      return minutes + ":" + seconds + "." + milliseconds;
}
  • 1
    Using Math.floor for seconds and minutes might be a good idea. – inhan Mar 19 '12 at 0:18
  • Good point, fixed – Richard J. Ross III Mar 19 '12 at 0:21
  • Math.floor is not required for milliseconds. – RobG Mar 19 '12 at 0:33
  • @RobG It was not about milliseconds, it was about the 2 lines in Richard's code. – inhan Mar 19 '12 at 1:50
  • @inhan—agreed, I gave you +1. But Richard had a Math.floor for ms too that has now been removed. :-) – RobG Mar 19 '12 at 2:49
9

Why not use the Date object like this?

let getTime = (milli) => {
  let time = new Date(milli);
  let hours = time.getUTCHours();
  let minutes = time.getUTCMinutes();
  let seconds = time.getUTCSeconds();
  let milliseconds = time.getUTCMilliseconds();
  return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds + ":" + milliseconds;
}

https://jsfiddle.net/4sdkpso7/6/

  • w3fools – jbabey Mar 19 '12 at 0:19
  • 1
    When I add 18000 (ie. 18 secs in milliseconds) and call time.getMinutes() it returns 30 mins, and time.getSeconds() it returns 18 secs, as I see the getMinutes consider the input as if it is in seconds. wheras getSeconds consider it in milliseconds, Is there a way to just pass milliseconds and the time.get**** method returns correct time. In my case I need output to be 0 mins 18 secs. – Rajshekar Reddy Sep 22 '14 at 15:20
  • @RajshekarReddy I fixed that issue by using the UTC getters. – sissonb Jun 3 '17 at 2:05
3
function millisecondsToTime(millisecs){
  var ms = Math.abs(millisecs) % 1000;
  var secs = (millisecs < 0 ? -1 : 1) * ((Math.abs(millisecs) - ms) / 1000);
  ms = '' + ms;
  ms = '000'.substring(ms.length) + ms;
  return secsToTime(secs) + '.' + ms;
}
2

This worked for me:

var dtFromMillisec = new Date(secs*1000);
var result = dtFromMillisec.getHours() + ":" + dtFromMillisec.getMinutes() + ":" + dtFromMillisec.getSeconds();

JSFiddle

  • The getHours() method returns the hour (from 0 to 23) of the specified date and time. So, if the milliseconds represent more than 24 hs, this is not going to work – IvanRF Jun 1 '16 at 22:09
2

Editing RobG's solution and using JavaScript's Date().

function msToTime(ms) {

    function addZ(n) {
        return (n<10? '0':'') + n;
    }
    var dt = new Date(ms);
    var hrs = dt.getHours();
    var mins = dt.getMinutes();
    var secs = dt.getSeconds();
    var millis = dt.getMilliseconds();

    var tm = addZ(hrs) + ':' + addZ(mins) + ':' + addZ(secs) + "." + millis;
    return tm;
}
1
const monthNames = ["Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", "May", "Jun",
 "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"
];
export function getFormattedDateAndTime(startDate) {
    if (startDate != null) {
      var launchDate = new Date(startDate);
       var day = launchDate.getUTCDate();
      var month = monthNames[launchDate.getMonth()];
      var year = launchDate.getFullYear(); 
      var min = launchDate.getMinutes();
      var hour = launchDate.getHours();
      var time = launchDate.toLocaleString('en-US', { hour: 'numeric', minute: 'numeric', hour12: true });

      return  day + " " + month + " " + year + " - " + time + ""  ;
    }
    return "";
   }
1

Here is a filter that use:

app.filter('milliSecondsToTimeCode', function () {
    return function msToTime(duration) {
        var milliseconds = parseInt((duration % 1000) / 100)
            , seconds = parseInt((duration / 1000) % 60)
            , minutes = parseInt((duration / (1000 * 60)) % 60)
            , hours = parseInt((duration / (1000 * 60 * 60)) % 24);

        hours = (hours < 10) ? "0" + hours : hours;
        minutes = (minutes < 10) ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
        seconds = (seconds < 10) ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

        return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds + "." + milliseconds;
    };
});

Just add it to your expression as such

{{milliseconds | milliSecondsToTimeCode}}
0
var 
         /**
         * Parses time in milliseconds to time structure
         * @param {Number} ms
         * @returns {Object} timeStruct
         * @return {Integer} timeStruct.d days
         * @return  {Integer} timeStruct.h hours
         * @return  {Integer} timeStruct.m minutes
         * @return  {Integer} timeStruct.s seconds
         */
        millisecToTimeStruct = function (ms) {
            var d, h, m, s;
            if (isNaN(ms)) {
                return {};
            }
            d = ms / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24);
            h = (d - ~~d) * 24;
            m = (h - ~~h) * 60;
            s = (m - ~~m) * 60;
            return {d: ~~d, h: ~~h, m: ~~m, s: ~~s};
        },

        toFormattedStr = function(tStruct){
           var res = '';
           if (typeof tStruct === 'object'){
               res += tStruct.m + ' min. ' + tStruct.s + ' sec.';
           }
           return res;
        };

// client code:
var
        ms = new Date().getTime(),
        timeStruct = millisecToTimeStruct(ms),
        formattedString = toFormattedStr(timeStruct);
alert(formattedString);
0
var secondsToTime = function(duration) {
  var date = new Date(duration);

  return "%hours:%minutes:%seconds:%milliseconds"
    .replace('%hours', date.getHours())
    .replace('%minutes', date.getMinutes())
    .replace('%seconds', date.getSeconds())
    .replace('%milliseconds', date.getMilliseconds());
}
0

try this function :-

function msToTime(ms) {
  var d = new Date(null)
  d.setMilliseconds(ms)
  return d.toLocaleTimeString("en-US")
}

var ms = 4000000
alert(msToTime(ms))

0

A possible solution that worked for my case. It turns milliseconds into hh:ss time:

function millisecondstotime(ms) {
var x = new Date(ms);
var y = x.getHours();
if (y < 10) {
y = '0' + y;
} 
var z = x.getMinutes();
if (z < 10) {
    z = '0' + z;
} 
return y + ':' + z;
}
0

This is the solution I got and working so good!

function msToHuman(duration) {
var milliseconds = parseInt((duration%1000)/100)
    seconds = parseInt((duration/1000)%60)
    minutes = parseInt((duration/(1000*60))%60)
    hours = parseInt((duration/(1000*60*60))%24);


return hours + "hrs " minutes + "min " + seconds + "sec " + milliseconds + 'ms';
}
-3

An Easier solution would be the following:

var d = new Date();
var n = d.getMilliseconds(); 
  • That's not what OP wants. – Artjom B. Jun 4 '15 at 10:23

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