2

Hi I am having some issues wrapping some ZMQ pull clients in Python classes. These classes are instanced and called in a Subprocess via the multiprocessing module. When the clients are functions all works but when they are classes the poller.poll() hangs.

The code bellow has both versions: One works, the other doesn't. Why?

import zmq
import time
import sys
import random
from  multiprocessing import Process

def server_push(port="5556"):
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket = context.socket(zmq.PUSH)
    socket.bind("tcp://*:%s" % port)
    print "Running server on port: ", port
    # serves only 5 request and dies
    for reqnum in range(10):
        if reqnum < 6:
            socket.send("Continue")
        else:
            socket.send("Exit")
            break
        time.sleep (1) 

def server_pub(port="5558"):
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket = context.socket(zmq.PUB)
    socket.bind("tcp://*:%s" % port)
    publisher_id = random.randrange(0,9999)
    print "Running server on port: ", port
    # serves only 5 request and dies
    for reqnum in range(10):
        # Wait for next request from client
        topic = random.randrange(8,10)
        messagedata = "server#%s" % publisher_id
        print "%s %s" % (topic, messagedata)
        socket.send("%d %s" % (topic, messagedata))
        time.sleep(1)    


class Client:
    def __init__(self,port_push, port_sub):
        context = zmq.Context()
        self.socket_pull = context.socket(zmq.PULL)
        self.socket_pull.connect ("tcp://localhost:%s" % port_push)
        print "Connected to server with port %s" % port_push
        self.socket_sub = context.socket(zmq.SUB)
        self.socket_sub.connect ("tcp://localhost:%s" % port_sub)
        self.socket_sub.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "9")
        print "Connected to publisher with port %s" % port_sub
        # Initialize poll set


    def __call__(self):
        poller = zmq.Poller()
        poller.register(self.socket_pull, zmq.POLLIN)
        poller.register(self.socket_sub, zmq.POLLIN)
        # Work on requests from both server and publisher
        should_continue = True
        print "listening"
        while should_continue:
            print "hello"
            socks = dict(poller.poll())
            print poller
            if self.socket_pull in socks and socks[self.socket_pull] == zmq.POLLIN:
                message = self.socket_pull.recv()
                print "Recieved control command: %s" % message
                if message == "Exit": 
                    print "Recieved exit command, client will stop recieving messages"
                    should_continue = False

                if self.socket_sub in socks and socks[self.socket_sub] == zmq.POLLIN:
                    string = self.socket_sub.recv()
                    topic, messagedata = string.split()
                    print "Processing ... ", topic, messagedata

def client(port_push, port_sub):
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket_pull = context.socket(zmq.PULL)
    socket_pull.connect ("tcp://localhost:%s" % port_push)
    print "Connected to server with port %s" % port_push
    socket_sub = context.socket(zmq.SUB)
    socket_sub.connect ("tcp://localhost:%s" % port_sub)
    socket_sub.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "9")
    print "Connected to publisher with port %s" % port_sub
    # Initialize poll set
    poller = zmq.Poller()
    poller.register(socket_pull, zmq.POLLIN)
    poller.register(socket_sub, zmq.POLLIN)
    # Work on requests from both server and publisher
    should_continue = True
    while should_continue:
        socks = dict(poller.poll())
        if socket_pull in socks and socks[socket_pull] == zmq.POLLIN:
            message = socket_pull.recv()
            print "Recieved control command: %s" % message
            if message == "Exit": 
                print "Recieved exit command, client will stop recieving messages"
                should_continue = False

        if socket_sub in socks and socks[socket_sub] == zmq.POLLIN:
            string = socket_sub.recv()
            topic, messagedata = string.split()
            print "Processing ... ", topic, messagedata

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # Now we can run a few servers 
    server_push_port = "5556"
    server_pub_port = "5558"
    Process(target=server_push, args=(server_push_port,)).start()
    Process(target=server_pub, args=(server_pub_port,)).start()
    #~ Process(target=client,args=(server_push_port,server_pub_port)).start()
    Process(target=Client(server_push_port,server_pub_port)).start()
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  • In limited work with the subprocess module I've noticed that it can be difficult to diagnose exceptions -- are you sure you have diagnosed it correctly and you aren't raising an exception somewhere else? One thing I've done in the past is explicitly break out the subprocesses into processes I can monitor in their own console window. Mar 19, 2012 at 13:26
  • This is just a test code, there is nothing hidden. Whatever is supposedly breaking, is taking place within pyzmq. I am hoping for a workaround regarding this, so that don't have to wait for a fix in pyzmq. I Agree that it is hard to debug when using multiprocess, but the convenience it provides outweighs this issue.
    – fccoelho
    Mar 19, 2012 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

2

Edit1: this is not quite correct...give me a few moments to get it right...

I think you may be invoking the Client class the wrong way. I'm not an expert with this, but I think your client should be subclassed from Process, and then run using the .start() function. So, define your Client class like this:

class Client(Process):
    def __init__(self, port_push, port_sub):
        (...) # your class init code here...make sure indentation is correct

Then at the end where you run the servers, create an instance of your Client class and start it like so:

client_class = Client(port_push, port_sub)
client_class.start()

Edit2: Here's an edited version of fccoelho's code that works for me.

The biggest problem appears to be that the ZMQ initialization stuff needs to be done in the __call__ method, not in __init__. I suspect this is due to how memory is allocated in multiprocessing, in that the __init__ function will be done in the parent process, while the __call__ function is done in the child process with a separate memory space. Apparently ZMQ doesn't like this. I've also added some wait times to prevent the client from connecting to the server before the server is ready, and to prevent the server from sending messages before the client subscribes. Also using 127.0.0.1 instead of localhost (my computer doesn't like localhost for some reason). Also removed the annoying print messages around the poll call in the client, and fixed the indentation problem where the client checks the poll results on the pubsub socket.

import zmq
import time
import sys
import random
from  multiprocessing import Process

def server_push(port="5556"):
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket = context.socket(zmq.PUSH)
    socket.bind("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % port)
    print "Running server on port: ", port
    time.sleep(1.0)
    # serves only 5 request and dies
    for reqnum in range(10):
        if reqnum < 6:
            socket.send("Continue")
        else:
            socket.send("Exit")
            print 'Push server sent "Exit" signal'
            break
        time.sleep(0.4) 

def server_pub(port="5558"):
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket = context.socket(zmq.PUB)
    socket.bind("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % port)
    socket.setsockopt(zmq.HWM, 1000)
    publisher_id = random.randrange(0,9999)
    print "Running server on port: ", port
    time.sleep(1.0)
    # serves only 5 request and dies
    for reqnum in range(10):
        # Wait for next request from client
        topic = random.randrange(8,10)
        messagedata = "server#%s" % publisher_id
        print "%s %s" % (topic, messagedata)
        socket.send("%d %s" % (topic, messagedata))
        time.sleep(0.4)    


class Client:
    def __init__(self,port_push, port_sub):
        self.port_push = port_push
        self.port_sub = port_sub
        # Initialize poll set

    def __call__(self):
        time.sleep(0.5)
        print 'hello from class client!'
        context = zmq.Context()
        self.socket_pull = context.socket(zmq.PULL)
        self.socket_pull.connect ("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % self.port_push)
        print "Connected to server with port %s" % self.port_push
        self.socket_sub = context.socket(zmq.SUB)
        self.socket_sub.connect ("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % self.port_sub)
        self.socket_sub.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "9")
        print "Connected to publisher with port %s" % self.port_sub

        poller = zmq.Poller()
        poller.register(self.socket_pull, zmq.POLLIN)
        poller.register(self.socket_sub, zmq.POLLIN)
        # Work on requests from both server and publisher
        should_continue = True
        print "listening"
        while should_continue:
            # print "hello"
            socks = dict(poller.poll())
            # print poller
            if self.socket_pull in socks and socks[self.socket_pull] == zmq.POLLIN:
                message = self.socket_pull.recv()
                print "Recieved control command: %s" % message
                if message == "Exit": 
                    print "Recieved exit command, client will stop recieving messages"
                    should_continue = False

            if self.socket_sub in socks and socks[self.socket_sub] == zmq.POLLIN:
                string = self.socket_sub.recv()
                topic, messagedata = string.split()
                print "Processing ... ", topic, messagedata

def client(port_push, port_sub):
    print 'hello from function client!'
    context = zmq.Context()
    socket_pull = context.socket(zmq.PULL)
    socket_pull.connect ("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % port_push)
    print "Connected to server with port %s" % port_push
    socket_sub = context.socket(zmq.SUB)
    socket_sub.connect ("tcp://127.0.0.1:%s" % port_sub)
    socket_sub.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, "9")
    print "Connected to publisher with port %s" % port_sub
    # Initialize poll set
    poller = zmq.Poller()
    poller.register(socket_pull, zmq.POLLIN)
    poller.register(socket_sub, zmq.POLLIN)
    # Work on requests from both server and publisher
    should_continue = True
    while should_continue:
        socks = dict(poller.poll(1000))
        if socket_pull in socks and socks[socket_pull] == zmq.POLLIN:
            message = socket_pull.recv()
            print "Recieved control command: %s" % message
            if message == "Exit": 
                print "Recieved exit command, client will stop recieving messages"
                should_continue = False

        if socket_sub in socks and socks[socket_sub] == zmq.POLLIN:
            string = socket_sub.recv()
            topic, messagedata = string.split()
            print "Processing ... ", topic, messagedata

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # Now we can run a few servers 
    server_push_port = "5556"
    server_pub_port = "5558"
    Process(target=server_push, args=(server_push_port,)).start()
    Process(target=server_pub, args=(server_pub_port,)).start()
    # Process(target=client,args=(server_push_port,server_pub_port)).start()
    Process(target=Client(server_push_port,server_pub_port)).start()

Finally, here's a cleaner implementation of multi-process pubsub that's very bare-bones, but demonstrates things more clearly:

import zmq
from multiprocessing import Process
import time

class ServerPubSub(Process):
    def __init__(self, port, n):
        Process.__init__(self)
        self.port = port
        self.n = n

    def run(self):
        self.context = zmq.Context()
        self.pub = self.context.socket(zmq.PUB)
        self.pub.bind('tcp://127.0.0.1:%d' % self.port)
        self.pub.setsockopt(zmq.HWM, 1000)

        time.sleep(1)

        end = False
        for i in range(self.n):
            print 'SRV: sending message %d' % i
            self.pub.send('Message %d' % i)
            print 'SRV: message %d sent' % i
            time.sleep(0.2)

        self.pub.close()

class ClientPubSub(Process):
    def __init__(self, port, n):
        Process.__init__(self)
        self.port = port
        self.n = n

    def run(self):
        self.context = zmq.Context()
        self.sub = self.context.socket(zmq.SUB)
        self.sub.connect('tcp://127.0.0.1:%d' % self.port)
        self.sub.setsockopt(zmq.SUBSCRIBE, '')
        self.poller = zmq.Poller()
        self.poller.register(self.sub, zmq.POLLIN)

        end = False
        count = 0
        while count < self.n:
            ready = dict(self.poller.poll(0))
            if self.sub in ready and ready[self.sub] == zmq.POLLIN:
                msg = self.sub.recv()
                print 'CLI: received message "%s"' % msg
                count += 1

        self.sub.close()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    port = 5000
    n = 10
    server = ServerPubSub(port, n)
    client = ClientPubSub(port, n)

    server.start()
    client.start()

    server.join()
    client.join()
5
  • That doesn't change anything, I am doing exactly that withou the subclassing. When a process is started the target callable is called. And if you run the code above, you will see that the call method is called because of the print "listening". It is the call to poller.poll() which hangs...
    – fccoelho
    Mar 19, 2012 at 13:37
  • Your indentation was screwed up when I first looked at your code and it looked like you were defining __call__ outside of the Client class. Mar 19, 2012 at 13:41
  • no, the indentation issue was when I pasted the code into stackoverflow. I have since fixed it here, but my code was indented correctly from the start
    – fccoelho
    Mar 19, 2012 at 14:57
  • Right, but the code I was working with wasn't. Also, I think there's still an indentation issue in your client code where you check the poll results on the pubsub socket. Mar 19, 2012 at 15:06
  • Thanks Brendan,Just moving the creation of the sockets to the call method solved the problem. The additional sleeps were not needed.
    – fccoelho
    Mar 19, 2012 at 15:55

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