58

I was thinking how to get the absolute value of an integer without using if statement nor abs(). At first I was using shift bits left (<<), trying to get negative sign out of the range, then shift bits right back to where it be, but unfortunately it doesn't work for me. Please let me know why it isn't working and other alternatives ways to do it.

8
  • If you know the size of the int you're dealing with, just use a bit-wise "and" to clear the highest-order bit. – Marc B Mar 19 '12 at 14:55
  • 3
    @MarcB: That'll work with sign/magnitude representation (which is fairly unusual) but fail miserably for 1's complement or (by far the most common) 2's complement. – Jerry Coffin Mar 19 '12 at 14:57
  • 1
    @MarcB: It's slightly more involved than that for 2's complement. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 19 '12 at 14:58
  • it's not a homework, but a question asked by my compiler course instructor. I found it is an interesting question because I've never done it this way before. By the way, solving this problem won't improve my grade for the course, but it will certainly improve my coding skills. ^__^ – shanwu Mar 21 '12 at 12:56
  • can someone explain me why ((n < 0) ? (-n) : (n)) or ((n < 0) ? (n * -1) : (n)) is wrong? – Karthik Chennupati Jan 6 '20 at 18:32

18 Answers 18

48

From Bit Twiddling Hacks:

int v;           // we want to find the absolute value of v
unsigned int r;  // the result goes here 
int const mask = v >> sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1;

r = (v + mask) ^ mask;
17
  • I think this is the answer the OP was looking for. – marton78 May 3 '13 at 13:22
  • 3
    v >> sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1 could you please explain what this does? – codey modey Feb 13 '14 at 2:57
  • 3
    @codeymodey: I didn't write the original, but this depends on 2's complement representation. It makes mask be equal to all 1s if the sign bit is set (since it is being shifted right and this is usually an arithmetic shift, so sign extension occurs). This is equivalent to setting mask to either -1 or 0 according to the sign bit. – Hasturkun Feb 13 '14 at 10:14
  • 3
    Isn't right shifting signed ints implementation defined ? Basically we are setting mask = 0x0 for positive and mask=0xffffffff for negative numbers. Isn't "-((unsigned)num>>31)" correct or is it slower ? – Zxcv Mnb Oct 23 '14 at 19:00
  • 1
    @ZxcvMnb: Yes, right shifting signed integers is implementation defined. As I mentioned in a previous comment, this is usually an arithmetic right shift (for instance, GCC defines this as such). I don't know if your variation is slower, though it probably requires more operations (i.e. logical shift, negate instead of a single arithmetic shift), in any case, both variations require a 2's complement representation. The linked page has more discussion, which you might find relevant. – Hasturkun Oct 29 '14 at 9:35
31
int abs(int v) 
{
  return v * ((v>0) - (v<0));
}

This code multiplies the value of v with -1 or 1 to get abs(v). Hence, inside the parenthesis will be one of -1 or 1.

If v is positive, the expression (v>0) is true and will have the value 1 while (v<0) is false (with a value 0 for false). Hence, when v is positive ((v>0) - (v<0)) = (1-0) = 1. And the whole expression is: v * (1) == v.

If v is negative, the expression (v>0) is false and will have the value 0 while (v<0) is true (value 1). Thus, for negative v, ((v>0) - (v<0)) = (0-1) = -1. And the whole expression is: v * (-1) == -v.

When v == 0, both (v<0) and (v>0) will evaluate to 0, leaving: v * 0 == 0.

1
  • 10
    just doing v * ((v>0) - (v<0)) would be equivalent and easier to read, no? – Jens Gustedt Mar 19 '12 at 16:38
22

Branchless:

int abs (int n) {
    const int ret[2] = { n, -n };
    return ret [n<0];
}

Note 4.7 Integral Conversions / 4: [...] If the source type is bool, the value false is converted to zero and the value true is converted to one.

6
  • 9
    "branch-free" in C, may not be once compiled. To be interesting, "branchfree" really is a property of the object code, not of the source. – Steve Jessop Mar 19 '12 at 15:07
  • @SteveJessop: But more seriously: Probably, with any half-decent compiler. However, this is also branchfree in the code structure :) – Sebastian Mach Mar 19 '12 at 15:08
  • well, suppose I'd said "most likely not once compiled". Would I be right or wrong, would it even matter? ;-) – Steve Jessop Mar 19 '12 at 15:09
  • 2
    Nope, and my "may" was of the style of saying the classy laconian "If.". I think there isn't too much value in the question, and my answer was more an intentionally grunty demonstration :P – Sebastian Mach Mar 19 '12 at 15:14
  • How does the hardware implement the conversion from boolean to integer? Is that done without a conditional branch? – Kerrek SB Mar 22 '12 at 0:06
11

I try this code in C, and it works.

int abs(int n){
   return n*((2*n+1)%2); 
}

Hope this answer will be helpful.

2
  • The best answer here!! – Raz Luvaton Oct 26 '17 at 8:48
  • 3
    Causes overflow for large n. – Markus Feb 17 '18 at 4:48
8

Assuming 32 bit signed integers (Java), you can write:

public static int abs(int x)
{
    return (x + (x >> 31)) ^ (x >> 31);
}

No multiplication, no branch.

BTW, return (x ^ (x >> 31)) - (x >> 31); would work as well but it is patented. Yup!

Note: This code may take more then 10x longer then conditional statement (8bit Verison). This may be useful for Hardware programming System C etc

3
  • 1
    How do you even patent something like that? – Jeremy Rodi Oct 25 '15 at 6:05
  • 1
    The question is for c, not java. -1. – Ashish Ahuja Feb 25 '16 at 11:19
  • This code is as valid for c as it is for java. Replace int for int32_t – RedOrav Aug 20 '16 at 18:56
5

Try the following:

int abs(int n) 
{
  return sqrt(n*n);
}
2
  • 2
    sqrt is pretty costly, in addition it accepts double as parameter, so you have 2 conversions (int to double) and (double to int) – dousin Dec 17 '13 at 14:46
  • This actually almost lead me to a solution where I needed an expression where functions were not supported (calculated field in an ADO.Net DataColumn expression). It can also be written as (n*n)^(1/2). Unfortunately power (^) is also not supported... – Louis Somers Jul 7 '17 at 12:32
2

Bit shifting signed integers in the way you consider is undefined behaviour and thus not an option. Instead, you can do this:

int abs(int n) { return n > 0 ? n : -n; }

No if statements, just a conditional expression.

9
  • 3
    While technically this answers the question, a ternary is really just a compact if statement, so its probably not what OP is looking for. – Aaron Dufour Mar 19 '12 at 15:15
  • It uses a different syntax, and returns a value (unlike if), but once compiled still contains a branch, which is generally what people are talking about when they want to avoid if statements. This will probably compile to the same machine code as the obvious if implementation. – Aaron Dufour Mar 19 '12 at 15:21
  • 1
    @AaronDufour: But the standard does not define the ternary operator to be an if-statement. Actually, unlike if-statements, the ternary operator has a value, and it can yield an lvalue (e.g. x?y:z = 0;). What it compiles to is irrelevant. switch-statements may compile to lookup-tables, if-statements may completely dissapear, only the visible behavaiour of the program shall not change (with the exception of RVO) – Sebastian Mach Mar 21 '12 at 15:43
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    @phresnel But for such a contrived question, the only reasonable interpretation is trying to avoid conditional constructs, which includes both the ternary and if statements. Otherwise the question is trivial, as shown in this answer. This is what I was trying to convey with my talk of compiling to branches. – Aaron Dufour Mar 21 '12 at 17:34
  • 1
    @AaronDufour: The title says without using abs function nor if statement which to me sounds like it is if statements and the abs-family of functions which are to be avoided ... – Sebastian Mach Mar 22 '12 at 11:53
2

Here is another approach without abs(), if nor any logical/conditional expression: assume int is 32-bit integer here. The idea is quite simple: (1 - 2 * sign_bit) will convert sign_bit = 1 / 0 to -1 / 1.

unsigned int abs_by_pure_math( int a ) {
   return (1 - (((a >> 31) & 0x1) << 1)) * a;
}
2

Didn't saw this one. For two's complement representation and 32 bit int

( n >> 31 | 1 ) * n
1
  • Great solution! This is a better version- ( n >> sizeof(int)*8-1 | 1 ) * n – Minhas Kamal Jan 8 '17 at 18:37
2

No branches or multiplication:

int abs(int n) {
    int mask = n >> 31;
    return (mask & -n) | (~mask & n);
}
2

If your language allows bool to int cast (C/C++ like):

float absB(float n) {
    return n - n * 2.0f * ( n < 0.0f );
}
0

how about that:

value = value > 0 ? value: ~value + 1

its based on the fact that negative numbers are stored as 2's complement to there positive equivalent, and that one can build the 2's complement by first building the 1's complement and adding 1, so

 5 ->   0000 0101b
-5 ->  (1111 1010b) + 1 -> 1111 1011b 

what I did was basically to reverse this, so

-5 ->  1111 1011b
 5 -> (0000 0100b) + 1 -> 0000 0101b

I know it's a bit late but just had the same issue and landed here, hope this helps.

1
  • I'm not sure if this counts as not using an if. You certainly didn't use one but it won't be branchless which is the main purpose of not using an if (for example for performance when writing a shader). The ternary operator is usually just a syntactic sugar of an if stackoverflow.com/questions/4911400/… – Dani Barca Casafont Aug 28 '18 at 9:06
0

There are multiple reasons left shifting the sign bit out and right shifting back in place (v << 1 >> 1):

  • left shifting a signed type with a negative value has undefined behavior so it should not be used at all.
  • casting the value to unsigned would have the desired effect: (unsigned)v << 1 >> 1 does get rid of the sign bit, if there are no padding bits, but the resulting value is the absolute value of v only on systems with sign+magnitude representation, which are vanishingly rare nowadays. On the ubiquitous 2's complement architecture, the resulting value for negative v is INT_MAX+1-v

Hasturkun's solution unfortunately has implementation defined behavior.

Here is a variation that is fully defined for systems with 2's complement representation for signed values:

int v;           // we want to find the absolute value of v
unsigned int r;  // the result goes here 
unsigned int mask = -((unsigned int)v >> (sizeof(unsigned int) * CHAR_BIT - 1));

r = ((unsigned int)v + mask) ^ mask;
0

What about this one:

#include <climits>

long abs (int n) { // we use long to avoid issues with INT MIN value as there is no positive equivalents.
    const long ret[2] = {n, -n};
    return ret[n >> (sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1)];    // we use the most significant bit to get the right index.
}
0

Use division (and wider math) to form an "if". Perhaps not efficient, yet branchless.

int abs_via_division(int v) {
  // is_neg:0 when v >= 0
  //        1 when v < 0
  int is_neg = (int) ((4LL * v) / (4LL * v + 1));
  return  v * (1 - is_neg*2);
}

Works for all int when long long wider than int, aside from the usual trouble with |INT_MIN|.

-1

Use the ternary operator:

y = condition ? value_if_true : value_if_false;
-1

if you want a purely mathematical way that isn't too costly, try

f(x) = (x*x)/x

or in C++

function abs(auto x) {return ((x*x)/x);}
1
  • 1
    this doesn't work, as the denominator will bring back the sign into the result. – Louis-Jacob Lebel Oct 6 '20 at 7:16
-2

You have to combine bitwise not and addition.

4
  • He has, if he's to avoid conditionals. – zvrba Mar 19 '12 at 15:07
  • @zvrba See phresnel's array indexing trick. That does not use bitwise not or conditionals. – Aaron Dufour Mar 19 '12 at 15:14
  • 1
    Comparison is also conditional as it must produce 0/1 result. – zvrba Mar 19 '12 at 15:25
  • @zvrba: If answering to someone, always notify him with @foobar, foobar being his/her name. / The asker is looking for a way to get the absolute value without the abs family of functions and without using if-statements, not more, not less. Also, relational comparison in itself is not conditional, resulting control may be. And by your style of argumentation: Bitwise is abs as it must produce abs-result, and the whole discussion drowns. – Sebastian Mach Mar 22 '12 at 12:12

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