1

im trying make my own pow, but i'm getting wrong result

im getting : 2^3.3 = 16, which is wrong... why?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

double new_pow(double base, double power){

double result = 1;

for(int i = 0; i <= power; i++) {
    result *= base;
}


    return result;
}



int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {

    std::cout << new_pow(2,3.3) << endl;
    return 0;
}

Please help me find the bug

3

Ignacio's answer already mentions using logarithms. But we ultimately end up using exp() which again is a library function. So if you don't want to use library functions at all, then you have to resort to something like Taylor's expansion of x^y

As direct evaluation of Taylor's expansion for x^y is tedious, as Ignacio mentioned, base^power = exp( power*ln(base) ). And taylor's expansion for e^x is quite simple and that for ln(x) is also very simple. Both of them yield for simple interative/recursive implementation in C

Here is a simple implementation of e^x using the above Taylor's expansion

double pow_x ( double x , unsigned i )
{
       double prod=1;
       if ( i == 0 )
          return 1;
       while ( i )
       {
             prod*=x;
             i--;
       }
       return prod;
}

long long factorial ( unsigned n )
{
     if ( n == 0 )
        return 1;

     return n * factorial (n-1);
}

double expo ( double x, int terms )
{
       /* terms tells us how long should we expand the taylor's series */
       double sum=0;
       unsigned i=0;
       while ( i< terms )
       {
             sum+= pow_x(x,i)/factorial(i);
             i++;
       }
       return sum;
}

exp(5.93,20) gives 376.152869 which Google tends to agree.

I hope, using this example, you can implement ln(x) on your own.

  • THis is long... – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:37
  • any example ? in c++ or c? – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:40
  • @user1262876 I agree taylor's expansion is laborious to implement in C/C++. I am working here. Will edit my answer as soon as I find something – Pavan Manjunath Mar 20 '12 at 6:42
  • @user1262876 Check my edit – Pavan Manjunath Mar 20 '12 at 6:56
  • i did: inline double log(double x) { return x*(1.0 - x*(0.5 - x*(1.0/3.0 - x*(0.25 - x*(0.2 - x/6.0))))); } but it still give wrong, and the pow dosent output the right value... – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 14:07
5

The bug is that your loop runs 4 times, since it won't be more than 3.3 for 4 iterations. This is why floating point exponentiation is implemented with logarithms, not repeated multiplication.

  • +1. Only answer which is stating how to solve the problem instead of just pointing out the obvious error! – Pavan Manjunath Mar 20 '12 at 6:18
  • 3
    No, you should use logarithms instead of iteration. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 20 '12 at 6:20
  • 4
    Holy crap. Read the link. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 20 '12 at 6:22
  • 3
    Have you not heard of exp() before? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 20 '12 at 6:26
  • 2
    @Pavan: The asker never claimed to not have access to libm, only that they were "trying make [their] own pow". – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 20 '12 at 6:32
0

Because you are incrementing i by 1. so after 4.0, it will be directly incremented to 5.0, thus making the condition check of the loop false, and thus terminating the loop.

Also, your starting value for the loop variable is 0, so you should check it like this -

for(double i=0; i<power; i++)

You can take a look at this answer to get an idea about how to implement floating point exponentiation and here for a pretty high level implementation of it.

  • Still wont work! When the powers are floating point numbers, exponentiation cannot be so easily achieved using repeated multiplication – Pavan Manjunath Mar 20 '12 at 6:20
  • @PavanManjunath: See the edit. – MD Sayem Ahmed Mar 20 '12 at 6:22
0

You are looping by treating power as an int. The loop will run 4 times and return 2^4 = 16.

How to approximate decimal exponents using logarithms.

  • i changed it to double still .. wrong – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:18
  • @user1262876 You don't have to change it to double. I was simply mentioning why you are getting what you are getting. As Ignacio mentioned, non-integer exponents cannot be done this way. They are done with logarithms. – torrential coding Mar 20 '12 at 6:20
  • so i should use log? float.. im lost – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:21
  • @user1262876 Check the link in my answer. – torrential coding Mar 20 '12 at 6:26
0
for(int i = 0; i <= power; i++)

should be

for(int i = 1; i <= power; i++)

Otherwise, it will run for one extra iteration.

As mentioned in Ignacio Vazquez-Abram's answer. Assume you want the power y = x^b. That is equivalent to ln(y) = b*ln(x).

so y = exp(b*ln(x))

y = Math.e(b*Math.Log(x)) //Java
  • im getting = 8.. which is still wrong – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:15
  • You are using int...so your double is automatically typecasted to int....inside your for loop... – Shashank Kadne Mar 20 '12 at 6:16
  • i did change it to double.. before asking.. but still same – user1262876 Mar 20 '12 at 6:17
  • @user1262876 Check Ignacio's answer – Pavan Manjunath Mar 20 '12 at 6:17
  • This looks like java. – BЈовић Mar 20 '12 at 6:43

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