15

In response to my answer yesterday about rotating an Image, Jamund told me to use .data() instead of .attr()

First I thought that he is right, but then I thought about a bigger context... Is it always better to use .data() instead of .attr()? I looked in some other posts like what-is-better-data-or-attr or jquery-data-vs-attrdata

The answers were not satisfactory for me...

So I moved on and edited the example by adding CSS. I thought it might be useful to make a different Style on each image if it rotates. My style was the following:

.rp[data-rotate="0"] {
    border:10px solid #FF0000;
}
.rp[data-rotate="90"] {
    border:10px solid #00FF00;
}
.rp[data-rotate="180"] {
    border:10px solid #0000FF;
}
.rp[data-rotate="270"] {
    border:10px solid #00FF00;
}

Because design and coding are often separated, it could be a nice feature to handle this in CSS instead of adding this functionality into JavaScript. Also in my case the data-rotate is like a special state which the image currently has. So in my opinion it make sense to represent it within the DOM.

I also thought this could be a case where it is much better to save with .attr() then with .data(). Never mentioned before in one of the posts I read.

But then i thought about performance. Which function is faster? I built my own test following:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
<title>test</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
function runfirst(dobj,dname){
  console.log("runfirst "+dname);
  console.time(dname+"-attr");
  for(i=0;i<10000;i++){
    dobj.attr("data-test","a"+i);
  }
  console.timeEnd(dname+"-attr");
  console.time(dname+"-data");
  for(i=0;i<10000;i++){
    dobj.data("data-test","a"+i);
  }
  console.timeEnd(dname+"-data");
}
function runlast(dobj,dname){
  console.log("runlast "+dname);
  console.time(dname+"-data");
  for(i=0;i<10000;i++){
    dobj.data("data-test","a"+i);
  }
  console.timeEnd(dname+"-data");
  console.time(dname+"-attr");
  for(i=0;i<10000;i++){
    dobj.attr("data-test","a"+i);
  }
  console.timeEnd(dname+"-attr");  
}
$().ready(function() {
  runfirst($("#rp4"),"#rp4");
  runfirst($("#rp3"),"#rp3");
  runlast($("#rp2"),"#rp2");
  runlast($("#rp1"),"#rp1");
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="rp1">Testdiv 1</div>
    <div id="rp2" data-test="1">Testdiv 2</div>
    <div id="rp3">Testdiv 3</div>
    <div id="rp4" data-test="1">Testdiv 4</div>
</body>
</html>

It should also show if there is a difference with a predefined data-test or not.

One result was this:

runfirst #rp4
#rp4-attr: 515ms
#rp4-data: 268ms
runfirst #rp3
#rp3-attr: 505ms
#rp3-data: 264ms
runlast #rp2
#rp2-data: 260ms
#rp2-attr: 521ms
runlast #rp1
#rp1-data: 284ms
#rp1-attr: 525ms

So the .attr() function did always need more time than the .data() function. This is an argument for .data() I thought. Because performance is always an argument!

Then I wanted to post my results here with some questions, and in the act of writing I compared with the questions Stack Overflow showed me (similar titles)

And true enough, there was one interesting post about performance

I read it and run their example. And now I am confused! This test showed that .data() is slower then .attr() !?!! Why is that so?

First I thought it is because of a different jQuery library so I edited it and saved the new one. But the result wasn't changing...

So now my questions to you:

  • Why are there some differences in the performance in these two examples?
  • Would you prefer to use data- HTML5 attributes instead of data, if it represents a state? Although it wouldn't be needed at the time of coding? Why - Why not?

Now depending on the performance:

  • Would performance be an argument for you using .attr() instead of data, if it shows that .attr() is better? Although data is meant to be used for .data()?

UPDATE 1:
I did see that without overhead .data() is much faster. Misinterpreted the data :) But I'm more interested in my second question. :)

Would you prefer to use data- HTML5 attributes instead of data, if it represents a state? Although it wouldn't be needed at the time of coding? Why - Why not?

Are there some other reasons you can think of, to use .attr() and not .data()? e.g. interoperability? because .data() is jquery style and HTML Attributes can be read by all...

UPDATE 2:

As we see from T.J Crowder's speed test in his answer attr is much faster then data! which is again confusing me :) But please! Performance is an argument, but not the highest! So give answers to my other questions please too!

UPDATE 3:

My test seems to be false because of the fire-bug I used while testing! The same file in chrome listed attr faster and a second test on jsperf also says attr is faster

5
  • "Would performance be an argument for you using .attr() instead of data, if it shows that .attr() is better?" Yes... What else can be an argument?!
    – gdoron
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 8:47
  • Others could be: Better adjustable, beutifuler code, better editable, better understandable, etc... e.g. OOP Programming has less performance than procedural, but it is often better :)
    – Neysor
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 8:50
  • 4
    "Because performance is always an argument!" Not in 2012. Let's look at your runfirst #rp4 results: 10k iterations of attr took 515ms; 10k iterations of data took 268ms. That's 51.5 usec (microseconds, millionths of a second) each vs. 26.8 usec each. So you're wondering whether to use data if it saves you 24.7 usec. Humans perceive things on the order of tenths of seconds. So for it to matter, you have to do this op roughly 4,000 times in a tight loop for a human to notice the difference. That's just not even close to worth worrying about, even in a mousemove handler. :-) Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 8:51
  • @T.J.Crowder i agree with you as you can see to the response of gdoron. I did mean that performance is an argument, but not always the highest :)
    – Neysor
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 8:56
  • 1
    @Neysor: Ah, quite! An argument. Good distinction. Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 9:02

3 Answers 3

15

This performance part of the question screams of premature optimization; see below. (Lest you get the wrong idea: I too am frequently guilty of wondering about the same sort of premature optimization question.)

But getting performance out of the way (other points addressed below the graph): As far as I can see, attr is faster than data in jQuery 1.7.1: http://jsperf.com/jquery-setting-attr-vs-data This surprises me. Not that it's remotely likely to matter.

Gratuitous bar graph (longer lines = faster performance):

Gratuitous bar graph from jsperf

Are there some other reasons you can think of, to use .attr() and not .data()?

At least a couple come to mind:

  1. The advantage of data is that it doesn't have to write to the element every time; you only write to the actual element the first time, and from then on jQuery is just updating a value in a JavaScript object it maintains in a separate object cache (connected to the element via a key). (I'm not sure why it's slower than attr; perhaps because of the indirection.)

  2. One thing I dislike about data is that it's not symmetrical: The first time you access data on an element, the data object is seeded with data-* attributes from the element; but from there on out, there is no connection between the two.

    Example (live copy | live source):

    var target = $("#target");
    display("data('foo'): " + target.data("foo"));
    display("data-foo: " + target.attr("data-foo"));
    display("Setting data('foo')");
    target.data("foo", "updated data('foo')");
    display("data('foo'): " + target.data("foo"));
    display("data-foo: " + target.attr("data-foo"));
    display("Setting data-foo");
    target.attr("data-foo", "updated data-foo");
    display("data('foo'): " + target.data("foo"));
    display("data-foo: " + target.attr("data-foo"));
    

    Assuming the #target element starts out with data-foo="bar", the output is:

    data('foo'): bar
    data-foo: bar
    Setting data('foo')
    data('foo'): updated data('foo')
    data-foo: bar
    Setting data-foo
    data('foo'): updated data('foo')
    data-foo: updated data-foo

    That can be confusing and surprising. The way you have to think about it is that the data-* attributes are default values only. I just don't like how they're so dependent on whether you've called data before or not; unless you never write to the data-* attribute directly, you can't be sure what value data will get (the original from the markup, or a value you updated later before you called data). It seems a bit chaotic to me, but if you set yourself rules (never write to data-* attributes directly and only ever use data, for instance), you can avoid the chaos.

  3. When you use attr, you can only store strings. When you use data, you can store any JavaScript value or object reference.


Because performance is always an argument!

Not in 2012. :-) Or at least, it's a lot lower down the list relative to other arguments than it used to be absent a specific, demonstrable performance problem.

Let's look at your runfirst #rp4 results: 10k iterations of attr took 515ms; 10k iterations of data took 268ms. That's 51.5 usec (microseconds, millionths of a second) each vs. 26.8 usec each. So you're wondering whether to use data if it saves you 24.7 usec per operation. Humans perceive things on the order of tenths of seconds. So for it to matter, you have to do this op roughly 4,000 times in a tight loop for a human to notice the difference. That's just not even close to worth worrying about, even in a mousemove handler.

If you're into that kind of territory (4,000/second in a tight loop), you'll probably want to avoid storing the information on the element at all.

6
  • thanks for that, i liked your comment below. But i edited my post, because i did to much focus on performance, but i was really more interessted in the other questions :)
    – Neysor
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 9:04
  • I read it and thanks for your 2nd argument. i did not know that they are prefilled with data-*. 3rd argument is clear to me and often used :) But because i really want to know it: Would you use attr() in similar cases like i showed you although it isn't used in the time of programming. Just because you got a feeling that the designer could need it sometimes? Or would you always use .data() and if the request comes you will change it...
    – Neysor
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 9:34
  • 1
    @Neysor: For what it's worth, I don't think I've ever used data in a web site or web application; I think I've probably only used it for storing state in plug-ins (since the state is almost always element-specific), and the state in question hasn't been anything the designer would want. In your image rotation example, personally I'd lean toward attr, but I think it's a subjective thing. Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 9:51
  • 1
    @Neysor: OMG, I completely misread my own graph. attr seems to be faster than data. Well, it was early in my day. :-) Edited. Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 11:04
  • 1
    @Neysor: I have no idea why your test shows data to be faster, I'm not getting that result anywhere. One unusual thing about your test is that you're using the data- prefix even when using data, but I can't imagine why that would make the slightest difference. Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 11:27
1

Given that .data() is indeed slower than .attr() on most browsers, but the speed difference is not important in this question, one advantage of data() over attr() is that data will automatically coerce data- attributes to numbers or to boolean values if they match.

That means that

<div id="boolean" data-t="true" data-f="false">

will result in boolean runtime value of true & false when you run this:

console.log($('#boolean').data('t'));  // reports true (not a string)
console.log($('#boolean').data('f'));  // reports false (not a string)

and

<div id="number" data-n="123.456">

will result in a number runtime value of 123.456 when you run this:

console.log($('#number').data('n'));  // Reports 123.456 (not a string)

attr on the other hand only works with strings, but will convert value to strings for saving. It will not coerce values when you fetch them.

The choice between attr and data depends on the feature you need for a specific example:

  • Where I inject data- settings from the server into pages, I tend to use data() to access them, if only because it is shorter code.
  • If I need the data to be visible in the DOM, I will use attr() to save the values`.
0

You may use jQuery.data. It's almost always the fastest. jQuery tries to optimize its function on every browsers, and maximize compability. So with new versions of jQuery, you may gain performance for this function. This 2nd test gave me jQuery.data as the winner.

1
  • yes i see. But i did not make my point clear enough. Sorry! But i did mean that performance is an argument, but not the highest. Other reasons should be also compared. So what are you saying about my other questions? (see update1)
    – Neysor
    Commented Mar 20, 2012 at 9:12

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