9

So I am not sure why this is becoming so hard for me, but I need to sort high to low and low to high.

For high to low I have:

int a, b;
int temp;
int sortTheNumbers = len - 1;

for (a = 0; a < sortTheNumbers; ++a) {
    for (b = 0; b < sortTheNumbers; ++b) {
        if (array[b] < array[b + 1]) {
            temp = array[b];
            array[b] = array[b + 1];
            array[b + 1] = temp;
        }
    }
}

However, I can't for the life of me get it to work in reverse (low to high), I have thought the logic through and it always returns 0's for all the values. Any help appreciated!

The bigger picture is that I have a JTable with 4 columns, each column with entries of numbers, names, or dates. I need to be able to sort those back and forth.

Thanks!

3
  • Post what you have tried for low to high, and where it's running into trouble. It should only be a 1 character change (you can guess which character). Mar 20, 2012 at 16:38
  • sorting apart, maybe a linked list would help you to store the values AND to trasverse them from highest to lowest and back. no need to sort them all the time.
    – vulkanino
    Mar 20, 2012 at 16:40
  • 2
    You say you are doing that to sort a JTable: it would be easier to use a sorter rather than reimplementing a sort algorithm manually.
    – assylias
    Mar 20, 2012 at 16:58

11 Answers 11

22

Unless you think using already available sort functions and autoboxing is cheating:

Integer[] arr =
    { 12, 67, 1, 34, 9, 78, 6, 31 };
    Arrays.sort(arr, new Comparator<Integer>()
    {
        @Override
        public int compare(Integer x, Integer y)
        {
            return x - y;
        }
    });

    System.out.println("low to high:" + Arrays.toString(arr));

Prints low to high:[1, 6, 9, 12, 31, 34, 67, 78]

if you need high to low change x-y to y-x in the comparator

3

You are never visiting the last element of the array.

Also, you should be aware that bubble sort is pretty inefficent and you could just use Arrays.sort().

2
  • Why would he need to "visit" the last element of the array? There's nothing to swap it with. He does however compare it with the second-last element and swap them if they're out of order. Maybe I'm not understanding what you're suggesting, could you include a test input that doesn't work with the code he posted? Mar 20, 2012 at 16:42
  • Seems Arrays.sort is an eazy one , any drawback for that one ? Oct 22, 2013 at 12:23
3
  public class sorting {
  public static void main(String arg[])throws Exception{
  int j[]={1,28,3,4,2};   //declaring array with disordered values  

  for(int s=0;s<=j.length-1;s++){
  for(int k=0;k<=j.length-2;k++){
         if(j[k]>j[k+1]){   //comparing array values

    int temp=0;    
    temp=j[k];     //storing value of array in temp variable 

j[k]=j[k+1];    //swaping values
j[k+1]=temp;    //now storing temp value in array


}    //end if block             
}  // end inner loop    
}
//end outer loop

for(int s=0;s<=j.length-1;s++){
System.out.println(j[s]);       //retrieving values of array in ascending order 

}   

}
}
0
2

You just need to write one string Arrays.sort(arr) for low to high for Java 8.

Arrays.sort(arr, Collections.reverseOrder()) for high to low

1

The only thing you need to do to change the sort order is change

if (array[b] < array[b + 1])

to

if (array[b] > array[b + 1])

Although, as others have noted, it's very inefficient! :-)

2
  • Yes I figured all I had to do was switch that sign, but it returns 0's instead of the actual values, as if it is erasing them. As for bugs, it seems unlikely since the code for the high to low is exactly the same within its own method, using the same reset variables.
    – Austin
    Mar 20, 2012 at 17:01
  • Sorry, I've re-examined it and I retract the bit about bugs! It's still a super-slow bubble-sort though ;-)
    – dty
    Mar 20, 2012 at 17:02
1

In java8 you can do something like this:

temp.stream()
    .sorted((e1, e2) -> Integer.compare(e2, e1))
    .forEach(e -> System.out.println(e));  
0

You need a more efficient sort. like mergesort. try www.geekviewpoint.com and go to sort

0

If you just want sort the int array: Use the quicksort... It's not a lot of code and it's N*lgN in avarage or N^2 in worst-case. To sort multiple data, use the Java Compare (as above) or a stable sorting algorithm

static void quicksort(int[] a,int l, int r){
    if(r <= l) return;
    int pivot = partition(a,l,r);

    //Improvement, sort the smallest part first
    if((pivot-l) < (r-pivot)){
        quicksort(a,l,pivot-1);
        quicksort(a,pivot+1,r);
    }else{
        quicksort(a,pivot+1,r);
        quicksort(a,l,pivot-1);
    }
}

static int partition(int[] a,int l,int r){
    int i = l-1;
    int j = r;
    int v = a[r];
    while(true){
        while(less(a[++i],v));  //-> until bigger
        while((less(v,a[--j]) && (j != i)));    //-> until smaller and not end
        if(i >= j){
            break;
        }
        exch(a,i,j);
    }
    exch(a,i,r);
    return i;
}
0

If you want to apply same logic as what you have done...by not using Arrays.sort...then following will help

int[] intArr = {5, 4, 3, 8, 9, 11, 3, 2, 9, 8, 7, 1, 22, 15, 67, 4, 17, 54};
    //Low to high
    for(int j=0; j<intArr.length-1; j++){
        for(int i=0; i<intArr.length-1; i++){
            if (intArr[i] > intArr[i+1]){
                int temp = intArr[i+1];
                intArr[i+1] = intArr[i];
                intArr[i] = temp;
            }
        }
    }
    //High to low
    for(int j=0; j<intArr.length-1; j++){
        for(int i=0; i<intArr.length-1; i++){
            if (intArr[i] < intArr[i+1]){
                int temp = intArr[i+1];
                intArr[i+1] = intArr[i];
                intArr[i] = temp;
            }
        }
    }
    for(int ars : intArr){
        System.out.print(ars+",");
    }
-2

You can try with bubble sort: Example shown below

int[] numbers = { 4, 7, 20, 2, 56 };
int temp;

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
{
       for(int j = 0; j < numbers.length; j++)
       {
                if(numbers[i] > numbers[j + 1])
                {
                            temp = numbers [j + 1];
                            numbers [j + 1]= numbers [i];
                            numbers [i] = temp;
                }
        }
}

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
{
         System.out.println(numbers[i].toString());
}
-2

Let me know if this works:

public class prog1 {
    public static void main (String args[]){
        int a[] = {1,22,5,16,7,9,12,16,18,30};

        for(int b=0; b<=a.length;b++){
            for(int c=0; c<=a.length-2;c++){
                if(a[c]>a[c+1]){

                    int temp=0;
                    temp=a[c];

                    a[c]=a[c+1];
                    a[c+1]=temp;
                }
            }

        }
        for(int b=0;b<a.length;b++){
            System.out.println(a[b]);
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Did you not try it to see if it worked before posting it? Even if you are on a mobile device (say), you can still use sites like ideone.com where you can write code and run it, e.g. your answer is this.
    – Wai Ha Lee
    Mar 23, 2015 at 17:59
  • In that case, you'd maybe be best off rewording your answer to be more of a statement (e.g. "this method works", etc.) If you explain why you've done what you did you'd stand a better chance of getting upvoted. (Also fix the formatting - consistent indentation, etc.).
    – Wai Ha Lee
    Mar 23, 2015 at 20:41

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