I read the following objects using Ajax and stored them in an array:

var homes = [
    {
        "h_id": "3",
        "city": "Dallas",
        "state": "TX",
        "zip": "75201",
        "price": "162500"
    }, {
        "h_id": "4",
        "city": "Bevery Hills",
        "state": "CA",
        "zip": "90210",
        "price": "319250"
    }, {
        "h_id": "5",
        "city": "New York",
        "state": "NY",
        "zip": "00010",
        "price": "962500"
    }
];

How do I create a function to sort the objects by the price property in ascending or descending order using only JavaScript?

25 Answers 25

up vote 1365 down vote accepted

Sort homes by price in ascending order:

homes.sort(function(a, b) {
    return parseFloat(a.price) - parseFloat(b.price);
});

Or after ES6 version:

homes.sort((a, b) => parseFloat(a.price) - parseFloat(b.price));

Some documentation can be found here.

  • 138
    You can use string1.localeCompare(string2) for string comparison – bradvido May 27 '14 at 13:51
  • 45
    Keep in mind that localeCompare() is case insensitive. If you want case sensitive, you can use (string1 > string2) - (string1 < string2). The boolean values are coerced to integer 0 and 1 to calculate the difference. – Don Kirkby May 1 '15 at 21:58
  • 1
    Is there a way to pass an argument to the compare function? Thought being to make this a reusable function to which I could pass the key on which to sort the object? – jlbriggs Jul 13 '15 at 15:00
  • 1
    @jlbriggs: see Triptych's answer below – Stobor Jul 23 '15 at 12:52
  • 2
    Thanks for the update, @Pointy, I don't remember running into this problem, but perhaps the behaviour has changed in the last couple of years. Regardless, the localeCompare() documentation shows that you can explicitly state whether you want case sensitivity, numeric sorting, and other options. – Don Kirkby Aug 28 '17 at 16:11

Here's a more flexible version, which allows you to create reusable sort functions, and sort by any field.

var sort_by = function(field, reverse, primer){

   var key = primer ? 
       function(x) {return primer(x[field])} : 
       function(x) {return x[field]};

   reverse = !reverse ? 1 : -1;

   return function (a, b) {
       return a = key(a), b = key(b), reverse * ((a > b) - (b > a));
     } 
}

Now you can sort by any field at will...

var homes = [{

   "h_id": "3",
   "city": "Dallas",
   "state": "TX",
   "zip": "75201",
   "price": "162500"

}, {

   "h_id": "4",
   "city": "Bevery Hills",
   "state": "CA",
   "zip": "90210",
   "price": "319250"

}, {

   "h_id": "5",
   "city": "New York",
   "state": "NY",
   "zip": "00010",
   "price": "962500"

}];

// Sort by price high to low
homes.sort(sort_by('price', true, parseInt));

// Sort by city, case-insensitive, A-Z
homes.sort(sort_by('city', false, function(a){return a.toUpperCase()}));
  • 7
    nickb - you're misreading the code. sort_by runs in O(1), and returns a function used by the built-in sort (O(N log N)) to compare items in a list. The total complexity is O(n log n) * O(1) which reduces to O(n log n), or the same as a quick sort. – Triptych Oct 31 '11 at 7:04
  • 34
    Excellent idea! A few issues: 1-A left parenthesis seems to be in the wrong place. 2-Setting the reverse looks reverse :) 3-Line break seems to cause issues. Overall, shouldn't that one-liner be return (A < B ? -1 : (A > B ? 1 : 0)) * [1,-1][+!!reverse]; ? – Halil Özgür Dec 9 '11 at 15:52
  • 20
    Here is a working jsfiddle vesrion of this code: jsfiddle.net/dFNva/1 – Blake Mills Jan 17 '13 at 4:32
  • 15
    I just found the explanation: + converts boolean to number; !! converts non-boolean to boolean. (dreaminginjavascript.wordpress.com/2008/07/04/28) So, [+!!reverse] provides an index for the [-1,1] array evaluating to either [-1,1][0] or [-1,1][1], which evaluates to -1 or 1. That's awesome, but confusing. – gfullam May 23 '14 at 15:24
  • 7
    Here is a fiddle based on @Blake Mills' fiddle: jsfiddle.net/gfullam/sq9U7 | It fixes the bug noted by Abby and implements "then by" sorting requested by AlanJames using the Crockford method of passing in another sort by function call as an option. – gfullam May 23 '14 at 18:09

To sort it you need to create a comparator function taking two arguments. Then call the sort function with that comparator function as follows:

// a and b are object elements of your array
function mycomparator(a,b) {
  return parseInt(a.price, 10) - parseInt(b.price, 10);
}
homes.sort(mycomparator);

If you want to sort ascending switch the expressions on each side of the minus sign.

for string sorting in case some one needs it,

var dataArr = {  

    "hello": [{
    "id": 114,
    "keyword": "zzzzzz",
    "region": "Sri Lanka",
    "supportGroup": "administrators",
    "category": "Category2"
}, {
    "id": 115,
    "keyword": "aaaaa",
    "region": "Japan",
    "supportGroup": "developers",
    "category": "Category2"
}]

};
var sortArray = dataArr['hello'];
sortArray.sort(function(a,b) {
    if ( a.region < b.region )
        return -1;
    if ( a.region > b.region )
        return 1;
    return 0;
} );

If you have an ES6 compliant browser you can use:

The difference between ascending and descending sort order is the sign of the value returned by your compare function:

var ascending = homes.sort((a, b) => Number(a.price) - Number(b.price));
var descending = homes.sort((a, b) => Number(b.price) - Number(a.price));

Here's a working code snippet:

var homes = [{
  "h_id": "3",
  "city": "Dallas",
  "state": "TX",
  "zip": "75201",
  "price": "162500"
}, {
  "h_id": "4",
  "city": "Bevery Hills",
  "state": "CA",
  "zip": "90210",
  "price": "319250"
}, {
  "h_id": "5",
  "city": "New York",
  "state": "NY",
  "zip": "00010",
  "price": "962500"
}];

homes.sort((a, b) => Number(a.price) - Number(b.price));
console.log("ascending", homes);

homes.sort((a, b) => Number(b.price) - Number(a.price));
console.log("descending", homes);

  • It returns the same array both for the descending and the ascending function. I smell a bug there. – HynekS May 28 at 20:40
  • Thanks for your comment, @Hynek. I've amended the sample to show the sort() function modifies the original array. – Stephen Quan May 29 at 0:40

You want to sort it in Javascript, right? What you want is the sort() function. In this case you need to write a comparator function and pass it to sort(), so something like this:

function comparator(a, b) {
    return parseInt(a["price"], 10) - parseInt(b["price"], 10);
}

var json = { "homes": [ /* your previous data */ ] };
console.log(json["homes"].sort(comparator));

Your comparator takes one of each of the nested hashes inside the array and decides which one is higher by checking the "price" field.

I recommend GitHub: Array sortBy - a best implementation of sortBy method which uses the Schwartzian transform

But for now we are going to try this approach Gist: sortBy-old.js.
Let's create a method to sort arrays being able to arrange objects by some property.

Creating the sorting function

var sortBy = (function () {
  var toString = Object.prototype.toString,
      // default parser function
      parse = function (x) { return x; },
      // gets the item to be sorted
      getItem = function (x) {
        var isObject = x != null && typeof x === "object";
        var isProp = isObject && this.prop in x;
        return this.parser(isProp ? x[this.prop] : x);
      };

  /**
   * Sorts an array of elements.
   *
   * @param  {Array} array: the collection to sort
   * @param  {Object} cfg: the configuration options
   * @property {String}   cfg.prop: property name (if it is an Array of objects)
   * @property {Boolean}  cfg.desc: determines whether the sort is descending
   * @property {Function} cfg.parser: function to parse the items to expected type
   * @return {Array}
   */
  return function sortby (array, cfg) {
    if (!(array instanceof Array && array.length)) return [];
    if (toString.call(cfg) !== "[object Object]") cfg = {};
    if (typeof cfg.parser !== "function") cfg.parser = parse;
    cfg.desc = !!cfg.desc ? -1 : 1;
    return array.sort(function (a, b) {
      a = getItem.call(cfg, a);
      b = getItem.call(cfg, b);
      return cfg.desc * (a < b ? -1 : +(a > b));
    });
  };

}());

Setting unsorted data

var data = [
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:30:43Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T17:22:59Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "Tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:28:54Z", quantity: 1, total: 300, tip: 200, type: "visa"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:53:41Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:48:46Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T17:25:45Z", quantity: 2, total: 200, tip: 0,   type: "cash"},
  {date: "2011-11-31T17:29:52Z", quantity: 1, total: 200, tip: 100, type: "Visa"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:58:03Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:20:19Z", quantity: 2, total: 190, tip: 100, type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-01T16:17:54Z", quantity: 2, total: 190, tip: 100, type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T17:07:21Z", quantity: 2, total: 90,  tip: 0,   type: "tab"},
  {date: "2011-11-14T16:54:06Z", quantity: 1, total: 100, tip: 0,   type: "Cash"}
];

Using it

Arrange the array, by "date" as String

// sort by @date (ascending)
sortBy(data, { prop: "date" });

// expected: first element
// { date: "2011-11-01T16:17:54Z", quantity: 2, total: 190, tip: 100, type: "tab" }

// expected: last element
// { date: "2011-11-31T17:29:52Z", quantity: 1, total: 200, tip: 100, type: "Visa"}

If you want to ignore case sensitive, set the parser callback:

// sort by @type (ascending) IGNORING case-sensitive
sortBy(data, {
    prop: "type",
    parser: (t) => t.toUpperCase()
});

// expected: first element
// { date: "2011-11-14T16:54:06Z", quantity: 1, total: 100, tip: 0, type: "Cash" }

// expected: last element
// { date: "2011-11-31T17:29:52Z", quantity: 1, total: 200, tip: 100, type: "Visa" }

If you want to convert the "date" field as Date type:

// sort by @date (descending) AS Date object
sortBy(data, {
    prop: "date",
    desc: true,
    parser: (d) => new Date(d)
});

// expected: first element
// { date: "2011-11-31T17:29:52Z", quantity: 1, total: 200, tip: 100, type: "Visa"}

// expected: last element
// { date: "2011-11-01T16:17:54Z", quantity: 2, total: 190, tip: 100, type: "tab" }

Here you can play with the code: jsbin.com/lesebi

Thanks to @Ozesh by his feedback, the issue related to properties with falsy values was fixed.

  • I added a new and more powerful implementation, allowing multiple sort, e.g. field1 ASC, after field2 DESC, after field3 DESC. The new sortBy method is an implementation of Schwartzian transform and you can find it here: gist: sortBy.js – jherax Apr 11 '16 at 4:07
  • This seems to breaks when a field is null. – TSNev Aug 25 '16 at 13:51
  • @TSNev could you please provide an example (jsfiddle, plunkr, etc)? I tried to replicate it with no success, null values were ordered at the end of array. – jherax Aug 25 '16 at 17:11
  • In case you are sorting through numbers and you encounter a '0' in between the array of objects, you might notice that the above code breaks.. Here is a quick fix for that : var checkNaN = function (value) { return Number.isNaN(Number(value)) ? 0 : value; } followed by: return function (array, o) { .... a = _getItem.call(o, a); a = checkNaN(a); b = _getItem.call(o, b); b = checkNaN(b); return o.desc * (a < b ? -1 : +(a > b)); }); – Ozesh Oct 20 '16 at 4:29
  • 1
    Thank you for your feedback @Ozesh, the sortBy version above is deprecated :) I have written a new and more powerful implementation for sorting arrays. Check this gist: sortBy – jherax Oct 20 '16 at 4:43

Use lodash.sortBy, (instructions using commonjs, you can also just put the script include-tag for the cdn at the top of your html)

var sortBy = require('lodash.sortby');
// or
sortBy = require('lodash').sortBy;

Descending order

var descendingOrder = sortBy( homes, 'price' ).reverse();

Ascending order

var ascendingOrder = sortBy( homes, 'price' );
  • 1
    Or const sortBy = require('lodash/sortBy'); let calendars = sortBy(calendarListResponse.items, cal => cal.summary); – mpen Oct 17 '16 at 1:13
  • not sure if loadash changed recently by now its named OrderBy import { orderBy } from 'lodash'; ... ... return orderBy ( rows, 'fieldName' ).reverse(); – montelof Dec 8 '16 at 21:56

This could have been achieved through a simple one line valueof() sort function. Run code snippet below to see demo.

var homes = [
    {
        "h_id": "3",
        "city": "Dallas",
        "state": "TX",
        "zip": "75201",
        "price": "162500"
    }, {
        "h_id": "4",
        "city": "Bevery Hills",
        "state": "CA",
        "zip": "90210",
        "price": "319250"
    }, {
        "h_id": "5",
        "city": "New York",
        "state": "NY",
        "zip": "00010",
        "price": "962500"
    }
];

console.log("To sort descending/highest first, use operator '<'");

homes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.price.valueOf() < b.price.valueOf();});

console.log(homes);

console.log("To sort ascending/lowest first, use operator '>'");

homes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.price.valueOf() > b.price.valueOf();});

console.log(homes);

You can use the JavaScript sort method with a callback function:

function compareASC(homeA, homeB)
{
    return parseFloat(homeA.price) - parseFloat(homeB.price);
}

function compareDESC(homeA, homeB)
{
    return parseFloat(homeB.price) - parseFloat(homeA.price);
}

// Sort ASC
homes.sort(compareASC);

// Sort DESC
homes.sort(compareDESC);

Here is a culmination of all answers above.

Fiddle validation: http://jsfiddle.net/bobberino/4qqk3/

var sortOn = function (arr, prop, reverse, numeric) {

    // Ensure there's a property
    if (!prop || !arr) {
        return arr
    }

    // Set up sort function
    var sort_by = function (field, rev, primer) {

        // Return the required a,b function
        return function (a, b) {

            // Reset a, b to the field
            a = primer(a[field]), b = primer(b[field]);

            // Do actual sorting, reverse as needed
            return ((a < b) ? -1 : ((a > b) ? 1 : 0)) * (rev ? -1 : 1);
        }

    }

    // Distinguish between numeric and string to prevent 100's from coming before smaller
    // e.g.
    // 1
    // 20
    // 3
    // 4000
    // 50

    if (numeric) {

        // Do sort "in place" with sort_by function
        arr.sort(sort_by(prop, reverse, function (a) {

            // - Force value to a string.
            // - Replace any non numeric characters.
            // - Parse as float to allow 0.02 values.
            return parseFloat(String(a).replace(/[^0-9.-]+/g, ''));

        }));
    } else {

        // Do sort "in place" with sort_by function
        arr.sort(sort_by(prop, reverse, function (a) {

            // - Force value to string.
            return String(a).toUpperCase();

        }));
    }


}
  • can you please explain what is the significance of having * (rev ? -1 : 1); – TechTurtle Sep 28 '17 at 16:59
  • That's to reverse the order (ascending vs descending) the rev portion just flips normal results when the rev argument is true. Otherwise it'll just multiple by 1 which does nothing, when set, it'll multiply the result by -1, thereby inverting the result. – bob Sep 29 '17 at 18:16

I also worked with some kind of rating and multiple fields sort:

arr = [
    {type:'C', note:834},
    {type:'D', note:732},
    {type:'D', note:008},
    {type:'F', note:474},
    {type:'P', note:283},
    {type:'P', note:165},
    {type:'X', note:173},
    {type:'Z', note:239},
];

arr.sort(function(a,b){        
    var _a = ((a.type==='C')?'0':(a.type==='P')?'1':'2');
    _a += (a.type.localeCompare(b.type)===-1)?'0':'1';
    _a += (a.note>b.note)?'1':'0';
    var _b = ((b.type==='C')?'0':(b.type==='P')?'1':'2');
    _b += (b.type.localeCompare(a.type)===-1)?'0':'1';
    _b += (b.note>a.note)?'1':'0';
    return parseInt(_a) - parseInt(_b);
});

Result

[
    {"type":"C","note":834},
    {"type":"P","note":165},
    {"type":"P","note":283},
    {"type":"D","note":8},
    {"type":"D","note":732},
    {"type":"F","note":474},
    {"type":"X","note":173},
    {"type":"Z","note":239}
]

If you use Underscore.js, try sortBy:

// price is of an integer type
_.sortBy(homes, "price"); 

// price is of a string type
_.sortBy(homes, function(home) {return parseInt(home.price);}); 

While it is a bit of an overkill for just sorting a single array, this prototype function allows to sort Javascript arrays by any key, in ascending or descending order, including nested keys, using dot syntax.

(function(){
    var keyPaths = [];

    var saveKeyPath = function(path) {
        keyPaths.push({
            sign: (path[0] === '+' || path[0] === '-')? parseInt(path.shift()+1) : 1,
            path: path
        });
    };

    var valueOf = function(object, path) {
        var ptr = object;
        for (var i=0,l=path.length; i<l; i++) ptr = ptr[path[i]];
        return ptr;
    };

    var comparer = function(a, b) {
        for (var i = 0, l = keyPaths.length; i < l; i++) {
            aVal = valueOf(a, keyPaths[i].path);
            bVal = valueOf(b, keyPaths[i].path);
            if (aVal > bVal) return keyPaths[i].sign;
            if (aVal < bVal) return -keyPaths[i].sign;
        }
        return 0;
    };

    Array.prototype.sortBy = function() {
        keyPaths = [];
        for (var i=0,l=arguments.length; i<l; i++) {
            switch (typeof(arguments[i])) {
                case "object": saveKeyPath(arguments[i]); break;
                case "string": saveKeyPath(arguments[i].match(/[+-]|[^.]+/g)); break;
            }
        }
        return this.sort(comparer);
    };    
})();

Usage:

var data = [
    { name: { first: 'Josh', last: 'Jones' }, age: 30 },
    { name: { first: 'Carlos', last: 'Jacques' }, age: 19 },
    { name: { first: 'Carlos', last: 'Dante' }, age: 23 },
    { name: { first: 'Tim', last: 'Marley' }, age: 9 },
    { name: { first: 'Courtney', last: 'Smith' }, age: 27 },
    { name: { first: 'Bob', last: 'Smith' }, age: 30 }
]

data.sortBy('age'); // "Tim Marley(9)", "Carlos Jacques(19)", "Carlos Dante(23)", "Courtney Smith(27)", "Josh Jones(30)", "Bob Smith(30)"

Sorting by nested properties with dot-syntax or array-syntax:

data.sortBy('name.first'); // "Bob Smith(30)", "Carlos Dante(23)", "Carlos Jacques(19)", "Courtney Smith(27)", "Josh Jones(30)", "Tim Marley(9)"
data.sortBy(['name', 'first']); // "Bob Smith(30)", "Carlos Dante(23)", "Carlos Jacques(19)", "Courtney Smith(27)", "Josh Jones(30)", "Tim Marley(9)"

Sorting by multiple keys:

data.sortBy('name.first', 'age'); // "Bob Smith(30)", "Carlos Jacques(19)", "Carlos Dante(23)", "Courtney Smith(27)", "Josh Jones(30)", "Tim Marley(9)"
data.sortBy('name.first', '-age'); // "Bob Smith(30)", "Carlos Dante(23)", "Carlos Jacques(19)", "Courtney Smith(27)", "Josh Jones(30)", "Tim Marley(9)"

You can fork the repo: https://github.com/eneko/Array.sortBy

For a normal array of elements values only:

function sortArrayOfElements(arrayToSort) {
    function compareElements(a, b) {
        if (a < b)
            return -1;
        if (a > b)
            return 1;
        return 0;
    }

    return arrayToSort.sort(compareElements);
}

e.g. 1:
var array1 = [1,2,545,676,64,2,24]
output : [1, 2, 2, 24, 64, 545, 676]

var array2 = ["v","a",545,676,64,2,"24"]
output: ["a", "v", 2, "24", 64, 545, 676]

For an array of objects:

function sortArrayOfObjects(arrayToSort, key) {
    function compareObjects(a, b) {
        if (a[key] < b[key])
            return -1;
        if (a[key] > b[key])
            return 1;
        return 0;
    }

    return arrayToSort.sort(compareObjects);
}

e.g. 1: var array1= [{"name": "User4", "value": 4},{"name": "User3", "value": 3},{"name": "User2", "value": 2}]

output : [{"name": "User2", "value": 2},{"name": "User3", "value": 3},{"name": "User4", "value": 4}]

For sorting a array you must define a comparator function. This function always be different on your desired sorting pattern or order(i.e. ascending or descending).

Let create some functions that sort an array ascending or descending and that contains object or string or numeric values.

function sorterAscending(a,b) {
    return a-b;
}

function sorterDescending(a,b) {
    return b-a;
}

function sorterPriceAsc(a,b) {
    return parseInt(a['price']) - parseInt(b['price']);
}

function sorterPriceDes(a,b) {
    return parseInt(b['price']) - parseInt(b['price']);
}

Sort numbers (alphabetically and ascending):

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
fruits.sort();

Sort numbers (alphabetically and descending):

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
fruits.sort();
fruits.reverse();

Sort numbers (numerically and ascending):

var points = [40,100,1,5,25,10];
points.sort(sorterAscending());

Sort numbers (numerically and descending):

var points = [40,100,1,5,25,10];
points.sort(sorterDescending());

As above use sorterPriceAsc and sorterPriceDes method with your array with desired key.

homes.sort(sorterPriceAsc()) or homes.sort(sorterPriceDes())

With ECMAScript 6 StoBor's answer can be done even more concise:

homes.sort((a, b) => a.price - b.price)

Here is a slightly modified version of elegant implementation from the book "JavaScript: The Good Parts".

NOTE: This version of by is stable. It preserves the order of the first sort while performing the next chained sort.

I have added isAscending parameter to it. Also converted it to ES6 standards and "newer" good parts as recommended by the author.

You can sort ascending as well as descending and chain sort by multiple properties.

const by = function (name, minor, isAscending=true) {
    const reverseMutliplier = isAscending ? 1 : -1;
    return function (o, p) {
        let a, b;
        let result;
        if (o && p && typeof o === "object" && typeof p === "object") {
            a = o[name];
            b = p[name];
            if (a === b) {
                return typeof minor === 'function' ? minor(o, p) : 0;
            }
            if (typeof a === typeof b) {
                result = a < b ? -1 : 1;
            } else {
                result = typeof a < typeof b ? -1 : 1;
            }
            return result * reverseMutliplier;
        } else {
            throw {
                name: "Error",
                message: "Expected an object when sorting by " + name
            };
        }
    };
};

let s = [
    {first: 'Joe',   last: 'Besser'},
    {first: 'Moe',   last: 'Howard'},
    {first: 'Joe',   last: 'DeRita'},
    {first: 'Shemp', last: 'Howard'},
    {first: 'Larry', last: 'Fine'},
    {first: 'Curly', last: 'Howard'}
];

// Sort by: first ascending, last ascending
s.sort(by("first", by("last")));    
console.log("Sort by: first ascending, last ascending: ", s);     // "[
//     {"first":"Curly","last":"Howard"},
//     {"first":"Joe","last":"Besser"},     <======
//     {"first":"Joe","last":"DeRita"},     <======
//     {"first":"Larry","last":"Fine"},
//     {"first":"Moe","last":"Howard"},
//     {"first":"Shemp","last":"Howard"}
// ]

// Sort by: first ascending, last descending
s.sort(by("first", by("last", 0, false)));  
console.log("sort by: first ascending, last descending: ", s);    // "[
//     {"first":"Curly","last":"Howard"},
//     {"first":"Joe","last":"DeRita"},     <========
//     {"first":"Joe","last":"Besser"},     <========
//     {"first":"Larry","last":"Fine"},
//     {"first":"Moe","last":"Howard"},
//     {"first":"Shemp","last":"Howard"}
// ]

  • why is my answer community wiki ? – mythicalcoder Feb 7 '17 at 21:43
  • could we sort {"first":"Curly","last":"Howard", "property" : {"id" : "1"}} type of array by id? – Vishal Kumar Sahu Aug 14 '17 at 8:29
  • yes, the function has to be slightly modified to take in a new parameter, say, nestedName. You then call by with name="property", nestedName="id" – mythicalcoder Aug 15 '17 at 21:29

You will need two function

function desc(a, b) {
 return b < a ? -1 : b > a ? 1 : b >= a ? 0 : NaN;
}

function asc(a, b) {
  return a < b ? -1 : a > b ? 1 : a >= b ? 0 : NaN;
}

Then you can apply this to any object property:

 data.sort((a, b) => desc(parseFloat(a.price), parseFloat(b.price)));

let data = [
    {label: "one", value:10},
    {label: "two", value:5},
    {label: "three", value:1},
];

// sort functions
function desc(a, b) {
 return b < a ? -1 : b > a ? 1 : b >= a ? 0 : NaN;
}

function asc(a, b) {
 return a < b ? -1 : a > b ? 1 : a >= b ? 0 : NaN;
}

// DESC
data.sort((a, b) => desc(a.value, b.value));

document.body.insertAdjacentHTML(
 'beforeend', 
 '<strong>DESCending sorted</strong><pre>' + JSON.stringify(data) +'</pre>'
);

// ASC
data.sort((a, b) => asc(a.value, b.value));

document.body.insertAdjacentHTML(
 'beforeend', 
 '<strong>ASCending sorted</strong><pre>' + JSON.stringify(data) +'</pre>'
);

I recently wrote a universal function to manage this for you if you want to use it.

/**
 * Sorts an object into an order
 *
 * @require jQuery
 *
 * @param object Our JSON object to sort
 * @param type Only alphabetical at the moment
 * @param identifier The array or object key to sort by
 * @param order Ascending or Descending
 *
 * @returns Array
 */
function sortItems(object, type, identifier, order){

    var returnedArray = [];
    var emptiesArray = []; // An array for all of our empty cans

    // Convert the given object to an array
    $.each(object, function(key, object){

        // Store all of our empty cans in their own array
        // Store all other objects in our returned array
        object[identifier] == null ? emptiesArray.push(object) : returnedArray.push(object);

    });

    // Sort the array based on the type given
    switch(type){

        case 'alphabetical':

            returnedArray.sort(function(a, b){

                return(a[identifier] == b[identifier]) ? 0 : (

                    // Sort ascending or descending based on order given
                    order == 'asc' ? a[identifier] > b[identifier] : a[identifier] < b[identifier]

                ) ? 1 : -1;

            });

            break;

        default:

    }

    // Return our sorted array along with the empties at the bottom depending on sort order
    return order == 'asc' ? returnedArray.concat(emptiesArray) : emptiesArray.concat(returnedArray);

}
homes.sort(function(a, b){
  var nameA=a.prices.toLowerCase(), nameB=b.prices.toLowerCase()
  if (nameA < nameB) //sort string ascending
    return -1 
  if (nameA > nameB)
    return 1
  return 0 //default return value (no sorting)
})

Hi after reading this article, I made a sortComparator for my needs, with the functionality to compare more than one json attributes, and i want to share it with you.

This solution compares only strings in ascending order, but the solution can be easy extended for each attribute to support: reverse ordering, other data types, to use locale, casting etc

var homes = [{

    "h_id": "3",
    "city": "Dallas",
    "state": "TX",
    "zip": "75201",
    "price": "162500"

}, {

    "h_id": "4",
    "city": "Bevery Hills",
    "state": "CA",
    "zip": "90210",
    "price": "319250"

}, {

    "h_id": "5",
    "city": "New York",
    "state": "NY",
    "zip": "00010",
    "price": "962500"

}];

// comp = array of attributes to sort
// comp = ['attr1', 'attr2', 'attr3', ...]
function sortComparator(a, b, comp) {
    // Compare the values of the first attribute
    if (a[comp[0]] === b[comp[0]]) {
        // if EQ proceed with the next attributes
        if (comp.length > 1) {
            return sortComparator(a, b, comp.slice(1));
        } else {
            // if no more attributes then return EQ
            return 0;
        }
    } else {
        // return less or great
        return (a[comp[0]] < b[comp[0]] ? -1 : 1)
    }
}

// Sort array homes
homes.sort(function(a, b) {
    return sortComparator(a, b, ['state', 'city', 'zip']);
});

// display the array
homes.forEach(function(home) {
    console.log(home.h_id, home.city, home.state, home.zip, home.price);
});

and the result is

$ node sort
4 Bevery Hills CA 90210 319250
5 New York NY 00010 962500
3 Dallas TX 75201 162500

and another sort

homes.sort(function(a, b) {
    return sortComparator(a, b, ['city', 'zip']);
});

with result

$ node sort
4 Bevery Hills CA 90210 319250
3 Dallas TX 75201 162500
5 New York NY 00010 962500

For sort on multiple array object field. Enter your field name in arrprop array like ["a","b","c"] then pass in second parameter arrsource actual source we want to sort.

function SortArrayobject(arrprop,arrsource){
arrprop.forEach(function(i){
arrsource.sort(function(a,b){
return ((a[i] < b[i]) ? -1 : ((a[i] > b[i]) ? 1 : 0));
});
});
return arrsource;
}

While I am aware that the OP wanted to sort an array of numbers, this question has been marked as the answer for similar questions regarding strings. To that fact, the above answers do not consider sorting an array of text where casing is important. Most answers take the string values and convert them to uppercase/lowercase and then sort one way or another. The requirements that I adhere to are simple:

  • Sort alphabetically A-Z
  • Uppercase values of the same word should come before lowercase values
  • Same letter (A/a, B/b) values should be grouped together

What I expect is [ A, a, B, b, C, c ] but the answers above return A, B, C, a, b, c. I actually scratched my head on this for longer than I wanted (which is why I am posting this in hopes that it will help at least one other person). While two users mention the localeCompare function in the comments for the marked answer, I didn't see that until after I stumbled upon the function while searching around. After reading the String.prototype.localeCompare() documentation I was able to come up with this:

var values = [ "Delta", "charlie", "delta", "Charlie", "Bravo", "alpha", "Alpha", "bravo" ];
var sorted = values.sort((a, b) => a.localeCompare(b, undefined, { caseFirst: "upper" }));
// Result: [ "Alpha", "alpha", "Bravo", "bravo", "Charlie", "charlie", "Delta", "delta" ]

This tells the function to sort uppercase values before lowercase values. The second parameter in the localeCompare function is to define the locale but if you leave it as undefined it automatically figures out the locale for you.

This works the same for sorting an array of objects as well:

var values = [
    { id: 6, title: "Delta" },
    { id: 2, title: "charlie" },
    { id: 3, title: "delta" },
    { id: 1, title: "Charlie" },
    { id: 8, title: "Bravo" },
    { id: 5, title: "alpha" },
    { id: 4, title: "Alpha" },
    { id: 7, title: "bravo" }
];
var sorted = values
    .sort((a, b) => a.title.localeCompare(b.title, undefined, { caseFirst: "upper" }));

protected by Samuel Liew Oct 5 '15 at 9:03

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