65

I want to write a function that format int and decimal differently into string

I have this code:

and I want to rewrite it to generics:

    public static string FormatAsIntWithCommaSeperator(int value)
    {
        if (value == 0 || (value > -1 && value < 1))
            return "0";
        return String.Format("{0:#,###,###}", value);
    }

    public static string FormatAsDecimalWithCommaSeperator(decimal value)
    {
        return String.Format("{0:#,###,###.##}", value);
    }


    public static string FormatWithCommaSeperator<T>(T value) where T : struct
    {
        string formattedString = string.Empty;

        if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
        {
            if ((int)value == 0 || (value > -1 && value < 1))
            return "0";

            formattedString = String.Format("{0:#,###,###}", value);
        }

        //some code...
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// If the number is an int - returned format is without decimal digits
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string FormatNumberTwoDecimalDigitOrInt(decimal value)
    {
        return (value == (int)value) ? FormatAsIntWithCommaSeperator(Convert.ToInt32(value)) : FormatAsDecimalWithCommaSeperator(value);
    }

How can i use T in the function body?

What syntax should I use?

4
  • 6
    Why not just have two overloads? I'm guessing there is a reason for this but from your example I'd rather have two methods instead of switching on type. Mar 21, 2012 at 10:23
  • 1
    Why do you use generics here? Is your method usable for ANY struct, even for one I defined myself? Mar 21, 2012 at 10:23
  • 1
    Generics are not helpful here, you might as well use object as the argument type. Note how the code is the practically the same. Mar 21, 2012 at 10:28
  • Do you simply want the decimal place to be ommited if the value has no fractional part?
    – Jodrell
    Mar 21, 2012 at 10:43

12 Answers 12

85

You can use the TypeCode enum for switch:

switch (Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(T)))
{
    case TypeCode.Int32:
       ...
       break;
    case TypeCode.Decimal:
       ...
       break;
}

Since C# 7.0 you can use pattern matching:

switch (obj)
{
    case int i:
       ...
       break;
    case decimal d:
       ...
       break;
    case UserDefinedType u:
       ...
       break;
}

Beginning with C# 8.0 you can use switch expressions:

string result = obj switch {
    int i => $"Integer {i}",
    decimal d => $"Decimal {d}",
    UserDefinedType u => "User defined {u}",
    _ => "unexpected type"
};
3
  • 86
    What about user types? Jun 7, 2018 at 8:49
  • 16
    How would you use the second pattern when you have T and not obj? (i.e., when you know the type and you do not have an instance of that type). Jan 31, 2023 at 3:22
  • 1
    This is not generic types
    – nim
    Nov 16, 2023 at 6:00
54

Another way to do switch on generic is:

switch (typeof(T))
{
    case Type intType when intType == typeof(int):
        ...
    case Type decimalType when decimalType == typeof(decimal):
        ...
    default:
        ...
}

Note that when as a case guard in switch expressions was introduced in C# 7.0/Visual Studio 2017.

44

In modern C#:

public static string FormatWithCommaSeperator<T>(T value) where T : struct
{
    switch (value)
    {
        case int i:
            return $"integer {i}";
        case double d:
            return $"double {d}";
    }
}
3
  • 54
    what happens if I only got the T but not a value of T ? say public T Get<T>(string name){ }
    – Avlin
    Jul 13, 2018 at 8:02
  • 5
    You could use use default(T). But I'm not sure if that's faster then just having a dictionary with key type. If what you want is a keyed collection that returns different types, just keep the value as the common base type (or Object), and either do a direct cast in get that throws, or use as which returns null. that's perfect behaviour, doing the type check won't save you any code, and only complicate error handling. Jul 14, 2018 at 20:31
  • 7
    Correcting myself, The default(T) solution won't work for ref types, because the default is null. So you'll have to just test the type with, or probably just find a better design. Jul 25, 2018 at 21:22
18

I had a similar question, but with custom classes rather than built-in data types. Here's how I went about it:

switch (typeof(T).Name)
{
    case nameof(Int32):
        break;
    case nameof(Decimal):
        break;
}

I modified it to use the types you are using (i.e., int and decimal). I like this approach more than hard coding strings, as a refactor of a class name will not break this code.

With newer versions of C#, you could also do this some of the time:

switch (Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T)))
{
    case int _:
        break;
    case decimal _:
        break;
}

I say "some of the time" because that would only really work with types that have a default constructor. This approach uses pattern matching and discards. I don't really like it since you need to create an instance of the object (that you then throw away) and because of the default constructor requirement.

10

If you have an object, you can use C# 7 pattern matching. But if you don't have an object and want to switch on a generic type T, the best and fastest solution is just a ternary if operator.

public string TernaryIf<T>() =>
    typeof(T) == typeof(int) ? "#,###,###" :
    typeof(T) == typeof(decimal) ? "#,###,###.##" :
    null;

public string TrueSwitch<T>() =>
    true switch
    {
        true when typeof(T) == typeof(int) => "#,###,###",
        true when typeof(T) == typeof(decimal) => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string DefaultSwitch<T>() =>
    default(T) switch
    {
        int => "#,###,###",
        decimal => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string When_Switch<T>() =>
    typeof(T) switch
    {
        Type _ when typeof(T) == typeof(int) => "#,###,###",
        Type _ when typeof(T) == typeof(decimal) => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string TypeCodeSwitch<T>() =>
    Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(T)) switch
    {
        TypeCode.Int32 => "#,###,###",
        TypeCode.Decimal => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string WhenSwitch<T>() =>
    typeof(T) switch
    {
        Type intType when intType == typeof(int) => "#,###,###",
        Type decimalType when decimalType == typeof(decimal) => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string NameOfSwitch<T>() =>
    typeof(T).Name switch
    {
        nameof(Int32) => "#,###,###",
        nameof(Decimal) => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

public string ActivatorSwitch<T>() =>
    Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T)) switch
    {
        int => "#,###,###",
        decimal => "#,###,###.##",
        _ => null,
    };

Benchmarks:

Method Time
TernaryIf 0.37 ns
TrueSwitch 0.37 ns
DefaultSwitch 0.48 ns
When_Switch 1.92 ns
TypeCodeSwitch 3.85 ns
WhenSwitch 3.96 ns
NameOfSwitch 7.98 ns
ActivatorSwitch 12.10 ns
1
  • Thanks palota this saved me from writing some disgusting code which I very much wanted to avoid.
    – Anil M
    Aug 23, 2023 at 6:19
8

From C# 8 it's possible to do it this way which also works with Nullable:

switch ((Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) ?? typeof(T)).Name)
{
    case nameof(Int32):
        ...

    case nameof(Decimal):
        ...

    case nameof(Boolean):  // You can also switch types like 'bool' or Nullable 'bool?'
        ...

    case nameof(String):   // Why not to use 'string'?
        ...

    default:
        ...
}

If you prefer switch expressions you can use:

return (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) ?? typeof(T)).Name switch
{
    nameof(Int32) => ...,
    nameof(Decimal) => ...,
    nameof(Boolean) => ...,  // You can also switch types like 'bool' or Nullable 'bool?'
    nameof(String) => ...,   // Why not to use 'string'?
    _ => ...,
};
1
  • 1
    This (unfortunately) seems to be the cleanest option still, assuming there's no naming conflicts. It bothers me that C# doesn't directly support this. If you're not using value types like int or not worried about Nullable<?>, then this can even be simplified to just the typeof(T).Name as the value, which is makes this much shorter and easier to read than other options, none of which really seem better than just using if-else statements to check the type. Feb 13 at 1:39
6

Edit: If you only want to handle exactly int and double, just have two overloads:

DoFormat(int value)
{
}

DoFormat(double value)
{
}

If you insist on using generics:

switch (value.GetType().Name)
{
    case "Int32":
        break;
    case "Double":
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

OR

if (value is int)
{
    int iValue = (int)(object)value;
}
else if (value is double)
{
    double dValue = (double)(object)value;
}
else
{
}
2
  • You're right. I updated the post (added object cast). Anyways, I like the answer of Nikola better anyways - its much more readable. Mar 21, 2012 at 10:39
  • 1
    public T myMethod<T>(T value) where T : object is fine too, and you dont need cast!!
    – Lucas
    Nov 21, 2016 at 17:13
6

more formatted way to do switch on generic is:

switch (true)
{
    case true when typeof(T) == typeof(int):
        ...
    case true when typeof(T) == typeof(decimal):
        ...
    default:
        ...
}
2
  • 1
    ...this might as well just be if(typeof(T) == typeof(int)) ... else if(typeof(T) == typeof(decimal)) ... else ..., right? Feb 13 at 1:31
  • 1
    @ShelbyOldfield Yes, but some people might like switch case style pattern more. it's optional.
    – shtse8
    Feb 16 at 15:32
0

Alternatively you could always do:

public static string FormatWithCommaSeparator<T>(T[] items)
{
    var itemArray = items.Select(i => i.ToString());

    return string.Join(", ", itemArray);
}
0

You could check the type of the variabele;

    public static string FormatWithCommaSeperator<T>(T value)
    {
        if (value is int)
        {
            // Do your int formatting here
        }
        else if (value is decimal)
        {
            // Do your decimal formatting here
        }
        return "Parameter 'value' is not an integer or decimal"; // Or throw an exception of some kind?
    }
0

You could instead of using generics use IConvertible

    public static string FormatWithCommaSeperator(IConvertible value)
    {
            IConvertible convertable = value as IConvertible;
            if(value is int)
            {
                int iValue = convertable.ToInt32(null);
                //Return with format.
            }
            .....
    }
1
  • 5
    the line IConvertible convertable = value as IConvertible; seens redundant to me.
    – Lucas
    Nov 21, 2016 at 17:15
0

In C# 8 you can use (replace "..." with the relevant code):

... type switch
{
    Type _ when type == typeof(int) => ...,
    Type _ when type == typeof(decimal) => ...,
    _ => ... // default case
};

Another elegant option (replace "..." with the relevant code):

... Type.GetTypeCode(type) switch
{
    TypeCode.Int32 => ...,
    TypeCode.Decimal => ...,
    _ => ...
};

For more info: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/operators/switch-expression

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