I have a simple AJAX call, and the server will return either a JSON string with useful data or an error message string produced by the PHP function mysql_error(). How can I test whether this data is a JSON string or the error message.

It would be nice to use a function called isJSON just like you can use the function instanceof to test if something is an Array.

This is what I want:

if (isJSON(data)){
    //do some data stuff
}else{
    //report the error
    alert(data);
}

15 Answers 15

up vote 225 down vote accepted

Use JSON.parse

function isJson(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
  • 34
    Exception handling shouldn't be used to do something expected. – luisZavaleta Aug 31 '15 at 5:57
  • 21
    JSON.parse(1234) OR JSON.parse(0) OR JSON.parse(false) OR JSON.parse(null) all will not raise Exception and will return true !!. do not use this answer – Zalaboza Sep 12 '15 at 23:26
  • 10
    @Zalaboza 1234, 0, false, and null are all valid JSON values. If you want a predicate that tests if the JSON represents an object you'll need to do a little more. – Michael Lang Nov 18 '15 at 23:15
  • 16
    JSON.parse does a lot of computation to parse the string, and give you the json object if it succeeds, yet you're discarding the result which some users might want to use. That does not seem to be good. I'd instead return {value: JSON.parse(str), valid: true}; and in the catch block return {value: str, valid: false};.. and I'd change the function name to tryParse(). – Nawaz Jun 8 '16 at 8:24
  • 1
    @luisZavaleta then what do you suggest as a method – PirateApp Dec 26 '17 at 7:30

This code is JSON.parse(1234) or JSON.parse(0) or JSON.parse(false) or JSON.parse(null) all will return true.

function isJson(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

So I rewrote code in this way:

function isJson(item) {
    item = typeof item !== "string"
        ? JSON.stringify(item)
        : item;

    try {
        item = JSON.parse(item);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }

    if (typeof item === "object" && item !== null) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Testing result:

isJson test result

  • 1
    Nice work! Your last if statement could be simplified to a simple return statement such as: return (typeof suspect === "object" && suspect !== null); – Nebulosar Sep 10 at 7:35

If the server is responding with JSON then it would have an application/json content-type, if it is responding with a plain text message then it should have a text/plain content-type. Make sure the server is responding with the correct content-type and test that.

  • 2
    This is wrong, there are many other json-compatible mediatypes. Furthermore overrideMimeType can override the content-type header. – Knu Jun 18 '17 at 22:39

when using jQuery $.ajax() the response will have the responseJSON property if the response was JSON, this could be checked like this:

if (xhr.hasOwnProperty('responseJSON')) {}
  • 2
    This is I suspect is really the answer that most people are looking for, probably even the OP – Kirby Nov 4 '15 at 23:05
  • This is much more elegant than using the try catch block – Anurag Sinha Feb 15 at 15:56

I like best answer but if it is an empty string it returns true. So here's a fix:

function isJSON(MyTestStr){
    try {
        var MyJSON = JSON.stringify(MyTestStr);
        var json = JSON.parse(MyJSON);
        if(typeof(MyTestStr) == 'string')
            if(MyTestStr.length == 0)
                return false;
    }
    catch(e){
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
  • var json is not used? or just to catch the error ? – stackdave Jul 21 '17 at 11:48

Well... It depends the way you are receiving your data. I think the server is responding with a JSON formated string (using json_encode() in PHP,e.g.). If you're using JQuery post and set response data to be a JSON format and it is a malformed JSON, this will produce an error:

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: 'test2.php',
  data: "data",
  success: function (response){

        //Supposing x is a JSON property...
        alert(response.x);

  },
  dataType: 'json',
  //Invalid JSON
  error: function (){ alert("error!"); }
});

But, if you're using the type response as text, you need use $.parseJSON. According jquery site: "Passing in a malformed JSON string may result in an exception being thrown". Thus your code will be:

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: 'test2.php',
  data: "data",
  success: function (response){

        try {
            parsedData = JSON.parse(response);
        } catch (e) {
            // is not a valid JSON string
        }

  },
  dataType: 'text',
});
  • 1
    Intelligent answer! – Marcio Mazzucato Mar 2 '14 at 23:47
  • unless, of course you are trying to parse the error text in the error function in the above example and not sure if it is JSON... – Kirby Nov 4 '15 at 23:01
  • Great answer, although if response is empty, it will go to success :'( – Henrik Petterson Jul 24 '16 at 15:09

There are probably tests you can do, for instance if you know that the JSON returned is always going to be surrounded by { and } then you could test for those characters, or some other hacky method. Or you could use the json.org JS library to try and parse it and test if it succeeds.

I would however suggest a different approach. Your PHP script currently returns JSON if the call is successful, but something else if it is not. Why not always return JSON?

E.g.

Successful call:

{ "status": "success", "data": [ <your data here> ] }

Erroneous call:

{ "status": "error", "error": "Database not found" }

This would make writing your client side JS much easier - all you have to do is check the "status" member and the act accordingly.

var parsedData;

try {
    parsedData = JSON.parse(data)
} catch (e) {
    // is not a valid JSON string
}

However, I will suggest to you that your http call / service should return always a data in the same format. So if you have an error, than you should have a JSON object that wrap this error:

{"error" : { "code" : 123, "message" : "Foo not supported" } } 

And maybe use as well as HTTP status a 5xx code.

I use just 2 lines to perform that:

var isValidJSON = true;
try { JSON.parse(jsonString) } catch { isValidJSON = false }

That's all!

But keep in mind there are 2 traps:
1. JSON.parse(null) returns null
2. Any number or string can be parsed with JSON.parse() method.
   JSON.parse("5") returns 5
   JSON.parse(5) returns 5

Let's some play on code:

// TEST 1
var data = '{ "a": 1 }'

// Avoiding 'null' trap! Null is confirmed as JSON.
var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data).length ? true : false);

Console outputs:
data isValidJSON:  true
data isJSONArray:  false


// TEST 2
var data2 = '[{ "b": 2 }]'

var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data2) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data2 isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data2 isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data2).length ? true : false);

Console outputs:
data2 isValidJSON:  true
data2 isJSONArray:  true


// TEST 3
var data3 = '[{ 2 }]'

var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data3) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data3 isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data3 isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data3).length ? true : false);

Console outputs:
data3 isValidJSON:  false
data3 isJSONArray:  false


// TEST 4
var data4 = '2'

var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data4) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data4 isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data4 isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data4).length ? true : false);


Console outputs:
data4 isValidJSON:  true
data4 isJSONArray:  false


// TEST 5
var data5 = ''

var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data5) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data5 isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data5 isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data5).length ? true : false);


Console outputs:
data5 isValidJSON:  false
data5 isJSONArray:  false

// TEST 6
var data6; // undefined

var isValidJSON = data ? true : false
try { JSON.parse(data6) } catch(e) { isValidJSON = false }

console.log("data6 isValidJSON: ", isValidJSON);
console.log("data6 isJSONArray: ", isValidJSON && JSON.parse(data6).length ? true : false);

Console outputs:
data6 isValidJSON:  false
data6 isJSONArray:  false
  • I've created a fiddle for this answer at jsfiddle.net/fatmonk/gpn4eyav which includes the option of adding your own user test data as well. This looks like the basis of a good library function to me, but I'd like to understand more about why Test 1 is not a valid JSON array. – Fat Monk Jan 4 '17 at 10:25
  • Because an array must be specified by using [ and ]. For instance, [1, 2, 3] is a number array. ["a", "b", "c"] is a string array. And [{"a":1}, {"b":2}] is a JSON array. Your jsfiddle work seems really useful! – efkan Jan 4 '17 at 13:07
  • As simple as that?! So Test 1 is a JSON object and Test 2 is a JSON array consisting of a single JSON object element. Have I understood that correctly? – Fat Monk Jan 4 '17 at 13:11
  • Exactly you're right. – efkan Jan 4 '17 at 14:12
  • The question flagged as a possible duplicate of this (stackoverflow.com/questions/3710204/…) asks about achieving this without using try/catch so I've forked my fiddle to try to achieve that goal as well. The fork is at jsfiddle.net/fatmonk/827jsuvr and works with all tests above except for Test 3 which errors at the JSON.parse. Can anyone advise how to avoid that error without using try? – Fat Monk Jan 4 '17 at 17:04

You could try decoding it and catching the exception (native or json2.js):

try {
  newObj = JSON.parse(myJsonString);
} catch (e) {
  console.log('Not JSON');
}

However, I would suggest making the response always be valid JSON. If you get an error back from your MySQL query, simply send back JSON with the error:

{"error":"The MySQL error string."}

And then:

if (myParsedJSON.error) {
  console.log('An error occurred: ' + myParsedJSON.error);
}

I suggest in Typescript mode:

export function stringify(data: any): string {
    try {
         return JSON.stringify(data)
    } catch (e) {
         return 'NOT_STRINGIFIABLE!'
    }
}

All json strings start with '{' or '[' and end with the corresponding '}' or ']', so just check for that.

Here's how Angular.js does it:

var JSON_START = /^\[|^\{(?!\{)/;
var JSON_ENDS = {
  '[': /]$/,
  '{': /}$/
};

function isJsonLike(str) {
    var jsonStart = str.match(JSON_START);
    return jsonStart && JSON_ENDS[jsonStart[0]].test(str);
}

https://github.com/angular/angular.js/blob/v1.6.x/src/ng/http.js

  • 10
    This is an unbelievably wrong answer. – Duke Dougal Jun 7 '16 at 12:47
  • @DukeDougal care to clarify? Sometimes people start their json with a '[' but that's not terribly common. – carlin.scott Jun 8 '16 at 23:01
  • 1
    You need to parse it to work out of it is valid JSON. If it is invalid JSON then it is not JSON. The question is "how tell tell if a string is JSON or not?". By your approach, this would be JSON {fibble - and it's really not JSON. Consider also cases like the number 1 on its own - that is valid JSON. – Duke Dougal Jun 9 '16 at 2:51
  • 1
    "If it is invalid JSON then it is not JSON". The fact that you have to use the word "valid" shows that you're adding a qualification to the fact that it's more than just json. The question was simply "is it json" and my code example answers that question perfectly without assuming additional requirements. – carlin.scott Jun 9 '16 at 21:43
  • bad idea if you are using some of template systems and you have something like { someValue } will automatically pass the validation. – ncubica Sep 6 '16 at 21:30

In addition to previous answers, in case of you need to validate a JSON format like "{}", you can use the following code:

const validateJSON = (str) => {
  try {
    const json = JSON.parse(str);
    if (Object.prototype.toString.call(json).slice(8,-1) !== 'Object') {
      return false;
    }
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
  return true;
}

Examples of usage:

validateJSON('{}')
true
validateJSON('[]')
false
validateJSON('')
false
validateJSON('2134')
false
validateJSON('{ "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }')
true

The answers above are quite okay but JSON.parse is said to be expensive, so you most likely will want to retain the parsed data just in-case it passes, rather than parsing again.

function isJson(str) {
    if (typeof str !== "string" || `${str}`.length === 0) return [false, str];
    let json = "";
    let isValid = false;
    try {
        json = JSON.parse(str);
        isValid = true;
    } catch (e) {
        isValid = false
    }
    if (!json || typeof json !== "object") isValid = false;
    return [isValid, json]
};

//Usage
const [isValid, json] = isJson("[\"abc\", \"123\"]");
if(isValid) console.log(json);

Let's recap this (for 2018+).

Argument: Values such as true, false, null are valid JSON (?)

FACT: Yes and no! These primitive values are JSON-parsable but they are not well-formed JSON structures. JSON specification indicates JSON is built on on two structures: A collection of name/value pair (object) or an ordered list of values (array).

Argument: Exception handling shouldn't be used to do something expected.
(This is a comment that has 25+ upvotes!)

FACT: No! It's definitely legal to use try/catch, especially in a case like this. Otherwise, you'd need to do lots of string analysis stuff such as tokenizing / regex operations; which would have terrible performance.

hasJsonStructure()

This is useful if your goal is to check if some data/text has proper JSON interchange format.

function hasJsonStructure(str) {
    if (typeof str !== 'string') return false;
    try {
        const result = JSON.parse(str);
        return Object.prototype.toString.call(result) === '[object Object]' 
            || Array.isArray(result);
    } catch (err) {
        return false;
    }
}

Usage:

hasJsonStructure('true')             // —» false
hasJsonStructure('{"x":true}')       // —» true
hasJsonStructure('[1, false, null]') // —» true

safeJsonParse()

And this is useful if you want to be careful when parsing some data to a JavaScript value.

function safeJsonParse(str) {
    try {
        return [null, JSON.parse(str)];
    } catch (err) {
        return [err];
    }
}

Usage:

const [err, result] = safeJsonParse('[Invalid JSON}');
if (err) {
    console.log('Failed to parse JSON: ' + err.message);
} else {
    console.log(result);
}

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