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PHP has a is_readable function which checks to see if the file is readable by the owner of the script. Is there a corresponding script to see if a file is readable by a specified user, for example

is_readable('Gavrilo Princip', 'black_hand.srj')
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Not built in. I don't even think there is a command line utility to check if a certain user has read permissions to a file.

You can write your own function to do the checking though. Look into the fileperms(), fileowner(), filegroup(), and posix_getpwuid() functions.

  • Yes, I figure I have to run several if conditions on all three owner, group and others, then possibly check /etc/passwd – puk Mar 21 '12 at 16:48
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Check this question Check file permissions

PHP fileperms http://php.net/manual/en/function.fileperms.php

PHP stat http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.stat.php

The examples in there are for *nix systems. I don't know if it will operate the same on Windows hosts. With these you could get the GID and UID of the file.

I don't know if there is a PHP equivalent that would let you get the UID and/or GID of the particular system user. You may need to get that manually and search against those values. You can find the value typically in the /etc/passwd file

  • I should have mentioned that I am only interested in *nix systems. Thanks – puk Mar 21 '12 at 16:49
  • @puk Yea, there are ways to do this using exec(), but don't. exec() is too much of a security risk. If you have access to create users, then you have access to find their UID and GID. – Chris Mar 21 '12 at 16:53
  • are you sure you need access to create users? pretty much anyone can read the file permissions (provided they have read access on the parent directory) and then you check to see if userA is the owner, or is in the group or the file is readable by all. – puk Mar 21 '12 at 18:04
  • I know this wasn't in my original question, but do you know if something like is_readable would take ACLs into consideration? beginlinux.com/server_training/server-managment-topics/… – puk Mar 21 '12 at 18:16
  • @puk What I was saying is that the php functions will give you the file owner's UID and the file's GID, but no way to tie those to a specific username. So you need to be able to access the /etc/passwd file to say "UserA"'s UID is 1000 and belongs to GID 1002. My assumption was that, if you had these different system users, then you were able to create them and hence that you would have access to /etc/passwd – Chris Mar 22 '12 at 15:37
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Thanks to the help of Chris and AndrewR I have come up with a, as of yet untested, solution. This solution is implemented in shell, and waits for input from standard in (designed to work with Apache RewriteMap). However, it can easily be modified to be called from either the command line or from a PHP script. It is a little bit more complicated than it has to be because we are piping the input of a function (getfacl) to a while loop. When we do this, it starts a new suprocess, so any variables declared or updated inside this loop (ie. result) will not be available to the outside world. Furthermore, I used getfacl as I can later expand it to also work with ACL permissions as well. Finally, for implementation reasons, I already know the owner of the file (user) before calling this script, however, if this is not the case, one can easily find this from the getfacl command.

#!/bin/bash

#USAGE: STDIN viewer:user:file

while read line
do
   viewer=`echo $4 | cut -d ':' -f 1`
   user=`echo $4 | cut -d ':' -f 2`
   file=`echo $4 | cut -d ':' -f 3`

   result=$(
      getfacl $file 2>/dev/null | while read line
      do
         if [[ $user == $viewer ]] && [[ $line =~ ^user: ]]
         then
            permissions=`echo $line | cut -d ':' -f 3`
            if [[ $permissions =~ r ]]
            then
               echo true
               break
            fi
         elif [[ $user == $viewer ]] && [ $line =~ ^group: ]]
         then
            #NOTE: I take advantage of the fact that each user has one single group and that group has the same name as the user's name
            permissions=`echo $line | cut -d ':' -f 3`
            if [[ $permissions =~ r ]]
            then
               echo true
               break
            fi
         elif [[ $line =~ ^other: ]]
         then
            permissions=`echo $line | cut -d ':' -f 3`
            if [[ $permissions =~ r ]]
            then
               echo true
               break
            fi
         fi
      done
   )

   if [[ $result == "true" ]]
   then
      echo true
   else
      echo false
   fi
done

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