The best I could find, an if fclose fopen type thing, makes the page load really slowly.

Basically what I'm trying to do is the following: I have a list of websites, and I want to display their favicons next to them. However, if a site doesn't have one, I'd like to replace it with another image rather than display a broken image.

  • I think you can use CURL and check its return codes. But if it's the speed that is a problem, just do it offline and cache. – Michał Tatarynowicz Jun 11 '09 at 15:55
  • Yes, but I would still recommend using an offline script (run from cron) that parses the list of websites, checks if they've got favicons and cache that data for the frontend. If you don't/can't use cron, at least cache the results for every new URL you check. – Michał Tatarynowicz Jun 18 '09 at 14:49
  • 3
    For replacing a broken image with a placeholder image in browser, kindly consider a client-side solution using onerror of image e.g. a solution using jQuery – user216084 Apr 13 '15 at 6:27
  • Possible duplicate of PHP: How to check if image file exists? – Cees Timmerman May 19 '17 at 9:01

19 Answers 19

You can instruct curl to use the HTTP HEAD method via CURLOPT_NOBODY.

More or less

$ch = curl_init("http://www.example.com/favicon.ico");

curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_NOBODY, true);
curl_exec($ch);
$retcode = curl_getinfo($ch, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE);
// $retcode >= 400 -> not found, $retcode = 200, found.
curl_close($ch);

Anyway, you only save the cost of the HTTP transfer, not the TCP connection establishment and closing. And being favicons small, you might not see much improvement.

Caching the result locally seems a good idea if it turns out to be too slow. HEAD checks the time of the file, and returns it in the headers. You can do like browsers and get the CURLINFO_FILETIME of the icon. In your cache you can store the URL => [ favicon, timestamp ]. You can then compare the timestamp and reload the favicon.

  • 5
    just a note: retcode errors on all 400 codes so the validation would be >= not just > – Justin Bull Apr 30 '12 at 22:07
  • 3
    Some sites block access if you don't provide a user agent string, so I suggest following this guide to add CURLOPT_USERAGENT in addition to CURLOPT_NOBODY: davidwalsh.name/set-user-agent-php-curl-spoof – rlorenzo Aug 17 '12 at 22:30
  • Just retcode != 200 is enough for validation, no ? – Lyth Oct 12 '13 at 18:33
  • 4
    @Lyth 3XX retcodes aren't an error, but a redirection. Those should be either handled manually or using CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION. – Ramon Poca Oct 14 '13 at 14:48
  • 4
    Use curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER, false); as well to make sure same code works for URL's starting with HTTPS! – Krishan Gopal Apr 23 '14 at 9:57

As Pies say you can use cURL. You can get cURL to only give you the headers, and not the body, which might make it faster. A bad domain could always take a while because you will be waiting for the request to time-out; you could probably change the timeout length using cURL.

Here is example:

function remoteFileExists($url) {
    $curl = curl_init($url);

    //don't fetch the actual page, you only want to check the connection is ok
    curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_NOBODY, true);

    //do request
    $result = curl_exec($curl);

    $ret = false;

    //if request did not fail
    if ($result !== false) {
        //if request was ok, check response code
        $statusCode = curl_getinfo($curl, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE);  

        if ($statusCode == 200) {
            $ret = true;   
        }
    }

    curl_close($curl);

    return $ret;
}

$exists = remoteFileExists('http://stackoverflow.com/favicon.ico');
if ($exists) {
    echo 'file exists';
} else {
    echo 'file does not exist';   
}
  • 3
    remoteFileExists('stackoverflow.com/') this will also returns true, but its just a link. This function not checking is the link content type are file. – Donatas Navidonskis Dec 12 '14 at 9:41

CoolGoose's solution is good but this is faster for large files (as it only tries to read 1 byte):

if (false === file_get_contents("http://example.com/path/to/image",0,null,0,1)) {
    $image = $default_image;
}
  • +1. Is there what are the drawbacks for this solution against the CURL one? – Adriano Varoli Piazza Apr 15 '10 at 13:50
  • 1
    you can just use fopen - if the request return code is 404, fopen returns false. – s3v3n May 2 '11 at 17:05
  • 1
    +1 Great solution. – Josh Apr 13 '12 at 18:24
  • this is really slow and did not work for me (meaning it still displayed a broken image if the file path was not correct) – Helmut Jul 29 '12 at 9:00
  • This approach doesnt work if the server makes a redirection whenever an image or file doesnt exist. This happens when a site uses mod_rewrite or some sort of other "rules" how requests should be handled. – Erik Čerpnjak Aug 7 '15 at 8:59

This is not an answer to your original question, but a better way of doing what you're trying to do:

Instead of actually trying to get the site's favicon directly (which is a royal pain given it could be /favicon.png, /favicon.ico, /favicon.gif, or even /path/to/favicon.png), use google:

<img src="http://www.google.com/s2/favicons?domain=[domain]">

Done.

If you are dealing with images, use getimagesize. Unlike file_exists, this built-in function supports remote files. It will return an array that contains the image information (width, height, type..etc). All you have to do is to check the first element in the array (the width). use print_r to output the content of the array

$imageArray = getimagesize("http://www.example.com/image.jpg");
if($imageArray[0])
{
    echo "it's an image and here is the image's info<br>";
    print_r($imageArray);
}
else
{
    echo "invalid image";
}
  • Results in 404 warning when the remote resource is not available. For the time being, I handled it by suppressing error using @ in front of getimagesize, but feeling guilty for this hack. – user216084 Apr 11 '15 at 11:54
  • In my case this was the best approach, because I get redirected whenever an image/file doesnt exist. I second that the suppressing errors with @ is a no go but in this case it was neccessary. – Erik Čerpnjak Aug 7 '15 at 9:05
  • This works, but it's slower then curl solutions. – Michal Przybylowicz Apr 7 '16 at 8:33
  • I figured out that we could also use exif_imagetype, and it's much faster stackoverflow.com/a/38295345/1250044 – yckart Jul 10 '16 at 19:00

A complete function of the most voted answer:

function remote_file_exists($url)
{
    $ch = curl_init($url);
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_NOBODY, true);
    curl_exec($ch);
    $httpCode = curl_getinfo($ch, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE);
    curl_close($ch);
    if( $httpCode == 200 ){return true;}
}

You can use it like this:

if(remote_file_exists($url))
{
    //file exists, do something
}

This can be done by obtaining the HTTP Status code (404 = not found) which is possible with file_get_contentsDocs making use of context options. The following code takes redirects into account and will return the status code of the final destination (Demo):

$url = 'http://example.com/';
$code = FALSE;

$options['http'] = array(
    'method' => "HEAD",
    'ignore_errors' => 1
);

$body = file_get_contents($url, NULL, stream_context_create($options));

foreach($http_response_header as $header)
    sscanf($header, 'HTTP/%*d.%*d %d', $code);

echo "Status code: $code";

If you don't want to follow redirects, you can do it similar (Demo):

$url = 'http://example.com/';
$code = FALSE;

$options['http'] = array(
    'method' => "HEAD",
    'ignore_errors' => 1,
    'max_redirects' => 0
);

$body = file_get_contents($url, NULL, stream_context_create($options));

sscanf($http_response_header[0], 'HTTP/%*d.%*d %d', $code);

echo "Status code: $code";

Some of the functions, options and variables in use are explained with more detail on a blog post I've written: HEAD first with PHP Streams.

if (false === file_get_contents("http://example.com/path/to/image")) {
    $image = $default_image;
}

Should work ;)

  • 1
    hm... :( for me it did not... – Helmut Jul 29 '12 at 9:01
  • add @ before function – Tebe Aug 8 '16 at 8:33

PHP's inbuilt functions may not work for checking URL if allow_url_fopen setting is set to off for security reasons. Curl is a better option as we would not need to change our code at later stage. Below is the code I used to verify a valid URL:

$url = str_replace(' ', '%20', $url);
$ch = curl_init($url);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER, false); 
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_NOBODY, true);
curl_exec($ch);
$httpcode = curl_getinfo($ch, CURLINFO_HTTP_CODE);  
curl_close($ch);
if($httpcode>=200 && $httpcode<300){  return true; } else { return false; } 

Kindly note the CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER option which also verify the URL's starting with HTTPS.

A radical solution would be to display the favicons as background images in a div above your default icon. That way, all overhead would be placed on the client while still not displaying broken images (missing background images are ignored in all browsers AFAIK).

  • 1
    +1 if you're not checking multiple locations for their favicon (favicon.ico, favicon.gif, favicon.png) this seems to be the best solution – Galen Jun 11 '09 at 20:20
function remote_file_exists($url){
   return(bool)preg_match('~HTTP/1\.\d\s+200\s+OK~', @current(get_headers($url)));
}  
$ff = "http://www.emeditor.com/pub/emed32_11.0.5.exe";
    if(remote_file_exists($ff)){
        echo "file exist!";
    }
    else{
        echo "file not exist!!!";
    }

You could use the following:

$file = 'http://mysite.co.za/images/favicon.ico';
$file_exists = (@fopen($file, "r")) ? true : false;

Worked for me when trying to check if an image exists on the URL

You can use :

$url=getimagesize(“http://www.flickr.com/photos/27505599@N07/2564389539/”);

if(!is_array($url))
{
   $default_image =”…/directoryFolder/junal.jpg”;
}

You should issue HEAD requests, not GET one, because you don't need the URI contents at all. As Pies said above, you should check for status code (in 200-299 ranges, and you may optionally follow 3xx redirects).

The answers question contain a lot of code examples which may be helpful: PHP / Curl: HEAD Request takes a long time on some sites

There's an even more sophisticated alternative. You can do the checking all client-side using a JQuery trick.

$('a[href^="http://"]').filter(function(){
     return this.hostname && this.hostname !== location.hostname;
}).each(function() {
    var link = jQuery(this);
    var faviconURL =
      link.attr('href').replace(/^(http:\/\/[^\/]+).*$/, '$1')+'/favicon.ico';
    var faviconIMG = jQuery('<img src="favicon.png" alt="" />')['appendTo'](link);
    var extImg = new Image();
    extImg.src = faviconURL;
    if (extImg.complete)
      faviconIMG.attr('src', faviconURL);
    else
      extImg.onload = function() { faviconIMG.attr('src', faviconURL); };
});

From http://snipplr.com/view/18782/add-a-favicon-near-external-links-with-jquery/ (the original blog is presently down)

all the answers here that use get_headers() are doing a GET request. It's much faster/cheaper to just do a HEAD request.

To make sure that get_headers() does a HEAD request instead of a GET you should add this:

stream_context_set_default(
    array(
        'http' => array(
            'method' => 'HEAD'
        )
    )
);

so to check if a file exists, your code would look something like this:

stream_context_set_default(
    array(
        'http' => array(
            'method' => 'HEAD'
        )
    )
);
$headers = get_headers('http://website.com/dir/file.jpg', 1);
$file_found = stristr($headers[0], '200');

$file_found will return either false or true, obviously.

To check for the existence of images, exif_imagetype should be preferred over getimagesize, as it is much faster.

To suppress the E_NOTICE, just prepend the error control operator (@).

if (@exif_imagetype($filename)) {
  // Image exist
}

As a bonus, with the returned value (IMAGETYPE_XXX) from exif_imagetype we could also get the mime-type or file-extension with image_type_to_mime_type / image_type_to_extension.

This works for me to check if a remote file exist in PHP:

$url = 'https://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/stackoverflow/img/favicon.ico';
    $header_response = get_headers($url, 1);

    if ( strpos( $header_response[0], "404" ) !== false ) {
        echo 'File does NOT exist';
        } else {
        echo 'File exists';
        }

Don't know if this one is any faster when the file does not exist remotely, is_file(), but you could give it a shot.

$favIcon = 'default FavIcon';
if(is_file($remotePath)) {
   $favIcon = file_get_contents($remotePath);
}
  • -1, is_file does not seem to work with remote files. – greg0ire Mar 29 '12 at 14:41
  • From the docs: "As of PHP 5.0.0, this function can also be used with some URL wrappers. Refer to Supported Protocols and Wrappers to determine which wrappers support stat() family of functionality." – PatrikAkerstrand Mar 30 '12 at 20:29
  • Do you mean this could work if you register a stream wrapper? Edit your question to show a working example and I'll remove my downvote (and upvote you if I can). But for the moment, I tested is_file from the php cli with a remote file, and got false. – greg0ire Mar 31 '12 at 11:20
  • no working example: var_dump(is_file('http://cdn.sstatic.net/stackoverflow/img/sprites.png')); bool(false) – greg0ire Mar 31 '12 at 11:27

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