22

I am trying to point iconv to a directory and all files will be converted UTF-8 regardless of the current encoding

I am using this script but you have to specify what encoding you are going FROM. How can I make it autdetect the current encoding?

dir_iconv.sh

#!/bin/bash

ICONVBIN='/usr/bin/iconv' # path to iconv binary

if [ $# -lt 3 ]
then
  echo "$0 dir from_charset to_charset"
  exit
fi

for f in $1/*
do
  if test -f $f
  then
    echo -e "\nConverting $f"
    /bin/mv $f $f.old
    $ICONVBIN -f $2 -t $3 $f.old > $f
  else
    echo -e "\nSkipping $f - not a regular file";
  fi
done

terminal line

sudo convert/dir_iconv.sh convert/books CURRENT_ENCODING utf8
1
19

Maybe you are looking for enca:

Enca is an Extremely Naive Charset Analyser. It detects character set and encoding of text files and can also convert them to other encodings using either a built-in converter or external libraries and tools like libiconv, librecode, or cstocs.

Currently it supports Belarusian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Slovene, Ukrainian, Chinese, and some multibyte encodings independently on language.

Note that in general, autodetection of current encoding is a difficult process (the same byte sequence can be correct text in multiple encodings). enca uses heuristics based on the language you tell it to detect (to limit the number of encodings). You can use enconv to convert text files to a single encoding.

5
  • Your Enca link doesn't work. Is this updated one ? freecode.com/projects/enca – trante Mar 9 '14 at 14:03
  • It seems like Enca moved to Github since then. Notice that the freecode site also links to nonexistent Gitorious link. Updated the link in answer. – Michal Kottman Mar 9 '14 at 18:04
  • I wonder if you meant iconv rather than econv, because I can't find econv in the manual. – Daniel Dropik Dec 15 '14 at 0:01
  • Syntax: enca -x utf8 -L mylanguage file.srt. – kenorb May 18 '20 at 19:16
  • List of valid laguages in your version: enca -l languages ... But UBUNTU is ugly on update, my enca --version is 2005! How to upgrade it? – Peter Krauss Apr 9 at 10:59
9

You can get what you need using standard gnu utils file and awk. Example:

file -bi .xsession-errors gives me: "text/plain; charset=us-ascii"

so file -bi .xsession-errors |awk -F "=" '{print $2}' gives me "us-ascii"

I use it in scripts like so:

CHARSET="$(file -bi "$i"|awk -F "=" '{print $2}')"

if [ "$CHARSET" != utf-8 ]; then
  iconv -f "$CHARSET" -t utf8 "$i" -o outfile
fi
1
  • 3
    The heuristics used by file can be fairly crude, though. Watch out. – tripleee Aug 26 '12 at 21:22
5

Here is my solution to in place all files using recode and uchardet:

#!/bin/bash

apt-get -y install recode uchardet > /dev/null
find "$1" -type f | while read FFN # 'dir' should be changed...
do
  encoding=$(uchardet "$FFN")
  echo "$FFN: $encoding"
  enc=`echo $encoding | sed 's#^x-mac-#mac#'`
  set +x
  recode $enc..UTF-8 "$FFN"
done

put it into convert-dir-to-utf8.sh and run:

bash convert-dir-to-utf8.sh /pat/to/my/trash/dir

Note that sed is a workaround for mac encodings here. Many uncommon encodings need workarounds like this.

3
  • uchardet saved my script – Éderson T. Szlachta Feb 12 '18 at 15:25
  • TIP: Make a backup of your files and use a merge tool to check/compare the changes. Problems probably will appear! – Eduardo Lucio Oct 15 '18 at 19:29
  • recode doesn't seem to be maintained any more beside this fork – Pablo Bianchi Apr 23 '20 at 6:12
5

Compiling all them. Go to dir, create dir2utf8.sh:

#!/bin/bash
# converting all files in a dir to utf8

for f in *
do
  if test -f $f then
    echo -e "\nConverting $f"
    CHARSET="$(file -bi "$f"|awk -F "=" '{print $2}')"
    if [ "$CHARSET" != utf-8 ]; then
      iconv -f "$CHARSET" -t utf8 "$f" -o "$f"
    fi
  else
    echo -e "\nSkipping $f - it's a regular file";
  fi
done
1

First answer

#!/bin/bash

find "<YOUR_FOLDER_PATH>" -name '*' -type f -exec grep -Iq . {} \; -print0 |
while IFS= read -r -d $'\0' LINE_FILE; do
  CHARSET=$(uchardet $LINE_FILE)
  echo "Converting ($CHARSET) $LINE_FILE"

  # NOTE: Convert/reconvert to utf8. By Questor
  iconv -f "$CHARSET" -t utf8 "$LINE_FILE" -o "$LINE_FILE"

  # NOTE: Remove "BOM" if exists as it is unnecessary. By Questor
  # [Refs.: https://stackoverflow.com/a/2223926/3223785 ,
  # https://stackoverflow.com/a/45240995/3223785 ]
  sed -i '1s/^\xEF\xBB\xBF//' "$LINE_FILE"

done
# [Refs.: https://justrocketscience.com/post/handle-encodings ,
# https://stackoverflow.com/a/9612232/3223785 ,
# https://stackoverflow.com/a/13659891/3223785 ]

FURTHER QUESTION: I do not know if my approach is the safest. I say this because I noticed that some files are not correctly converted (characters will be lost) or are "truncated". I suspect that this has to do with the "iconv" tool or with the charset information obtained with the "uchardet" tool. I was curious about the solution presented by @demofly because it could be safer.

Another answer

Based on @demofly 's answer:

#!/bin/bash

find "<YOUR_FOLDER_PATH>" -name '*' -type f -exec grep -Iq . {} \; -print0 |
while IFS= read -r -d $'\0' LINE_FILE; do
  CHARSET=$(uchardet $LINE_FILE)
  REENCSED=`echo $CHARSET | sed 's#^x-mac-#mac#'`
  echo "\"$CHARSET\" \"$LINE_FILE\""

  # NOTE: Convert/reconvert to utf8. By Questor
  recode $REENCSED..UTF-8 "$LINE_FILE" 2> STDERR_OP 1> STDOUT_OP

  STDERR_OP=$(cat STDERR_OP)
  rm -f STDERR_OP
  if [ -n "$STDERR_OP" ] ; then

    # NOTE: Convert/reconvert to utf8. By Questor
    iconv -f "$CHARSET" -t utf8 "$LINE_FILE" -o "$LINE_FILE" 2> STDERR_OP 1> STDOUT_OP

    STDERR_OP=$(cat STDERR_OP)
    rm -f STDERR_OP
  fi

  # NOTE: Remove "BOM" if exists as it is unnecessary. By Questor
  # [Refs.: https://stackoverflow.com/a/2223926/3223785 ,
  # https://stackoverflow.com/a/45240995/3223785 ]
  sed -i '1s/^\xEF\xBB\xBF//' "$LINE_FILE"

  if [ -n "$STDERR_OP" ] ; then
    echo "ERROR: \"$STDERR_OP\""
  fi
  STDOUT_OP=$(cat STDOUT_OP)
  rm -f STDOUT_OP
  if [ -n "$STDOUT_OP" ] ; then
    echo "RESULT: \"$STDOUT_OP\""
  fi
done
# [Refs.: https://justrocketscience.com/post/handle-encodings ,
# https://stackoverflow.com/a/9612232/3223785 ,
# https://stackoverflow.com/a/13659891/3223785 ]

Third answer

Hybrid solution with recode and vim:

#!/bin/bash

find "<YOUR_FOLDER_PATH>" -name '*' -type f -exec grep -Iq . {} \; -print0 |
while IFS= read -r -d $'\0' LINE_FILE; do
  CHARSET=$(uchardet $LINE_FILE)
  REENCSED=`echo $CHARSET | sed 's#^x-mac-#mac#'`
  echo "\"$CHARSET\" \"$LINE_FILE\""

  # NOTE: Convert/reconvert to utf8. By Questor
  recode $REENCSED..UTF-8 "$LINE_FILE" 2> STDERR_OP 1> STDOUT_OP

  STDERR_OP=$(cat STDERR_OP)
  rm -f STDERR_OP
  if [ -n "$STDERR_OP" ] ; then

    # NOTE: Convert/reconvert to utf8. By Questor
    bash -c "</dev/tty vim -u NONE +\"set binary | set noeol | set nobomb | set encoding=utf-8 | set fileencoding=utf-8 | wq\" \"$LINE_FILE\""

  else

    # NOTE: Remove "BOM" if exists as it is unnecessary. By Questor
    # [Refs.: https://stackoverflow.com/a/2223926/3223785 ,
    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/45240995/3223785 ]
    sed -i '1s/^\xEF\xBB\xBF//' "$LINE_FILE"

  fi
done

This was the solution with the highest number of perfect conversions. Additionally, we did not have any truncated files.


  • WARNING: Make a backup of your files and use a merge tool to check/compare the changes. Problems probably will appear!
  • TIP: The command sed -i '1s/^\xEF\xBB\xBF//' "$LINE_FILE" can be executed after a preliminary comparison with the merge tool after a conversion without it since it can cause "differences".
  • NOTE: The search using find brings all non-binary files from the given path ("") and its subfolders.
2
  • 1
    Two minor notes: I would replace <YOUR_FOLDER_PATH> with "$1" and let the end user pass in the folder path. And for MacOS users, you need to run: brew install recode uchardet gnu-sed, and then change sed to gsed to get it to work. And nice job removing binary files using grep -I. Top marks! – phyatt Mar 7 '19 at 16:34
  • Your suggestions were accepted almost completely. I didn't keep the change 'I would replace <YOUR_FOLDER_PATH> with "$1"', because I thought the previous approach is clearer for more people. Thanks! = D – Eduardo Lucio Apr 24 '20 at 15:22
0

Check out tools available for a data convertation in a linux cli: https://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/debian-reference/ch11.en.html

Also, there is a quest to find out a full list of encodings which are available in iconv. Just run iconv --list and find out that encoding names differs from names returned by uchardet tool (for example: x-mac-cyrillic in uchardet vs. mac-cyrillic in iconv)

0

enca command doesn't work for my Simplified-Chinese text file with GB2312 encoding.

Instead, I use the following function to convert the text file for me. You could of course re-direct the output into a file.

It requires chardet and iconv commands.

detection_cat () 
{
    DET_OUT=$(chardet $1);
    ENC=$(echo $DET_OUT | sed "s|^.*: \(.*\) (confid.*$|\1|");
    iconv -f $ENC $1
}

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