In the same vein as Quickly create a large file on a Linux system, I'd like to quickly create a large file on a Windows system. By large I'm thinking 5 GB. The content doesn't matter. A built-in command or short batch file would be preferable, but I'll accept an application if there are no other easy ways.

20 Answers 20

up vote 361 down vote accepted
fsutil file createnew <filename> <length>

where <length> is in bytes.

fsutil requires administrative privileges though.

  • 6
    @ZXX +1 For my purposes I merely needed the file system to see the space as unavailable, but your information is helpful if someone else needs this. – Leigh Riffel Dec 22 '10 at 13:50
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    fsutil file createnew does not create a sparse file. – Per Mildner Jun 30 '13 at 17:58
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    It also works perfectly for upload tests. – Nicolas Raoul Sep 17 '13 at 8:35
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    "fsutil sparse setflag temp.txt" sets the sparse flag, making it a sparse file. "fsutil sparse setrange temp.txt 0 1024" sets the range of sparseness :) – Coldblackice May 10 '14 at 21:53
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    @ZXX fsutil file createnew does NOT create sparse files: c:\>fsutil file createnew test.txt 0x100000 File c:\test.txt is created c:\>fsutil sparse queryflag test.txt This file is NOT set as sparse – ivan_pozdeev Oct 20 '17 at 6:29

You can use the Sysinternals Contig tool. It has a -n switch which creates a new file of a given size. Unlike fsutil, it doesn't require administrative privileges.

  • 2
    Wow! Very fast to download and to run. The line I used is m:\contig -n M:\SpaceBuffer.tmp 5368709120 – Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 19:52
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    Just want to check if this is a sparse file or does the file actually have data in it? – slolife Jun 2 '11 at 17:35
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    It's not a sparse file (as far as I know) and the file is empty. – Joey Jan 4 '12 at 10:39
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    I'm confused here... if it is instantaneous, and it's not a sparse file, then how does it actually use up disk space? – Jason S Jan 4 at 16:22
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    @JasonS: contig effectively goes to the last byte and writes a single 0 there (just look with Process Monitor). Windows then fills the rest with zeroes. This is probably about as efficient as you can get with non-sparse files and creation of a file about 5 GiB in size only takes a few seconds even on my hard disk. I guess back then I've tried either on an SSD or with smaller files. But it is rather quick (and definitely faster than to write all bytes of the empty file by yourself. – Joey Jan 7 at 10:43

I was searching for a way to generate large files with data, not just sparse file. Came across the below technique:

If you want to create a file with real data then you can use the below command line script.

echo "This is just a sample line appended to create a big file.. " > dummy.txt
for /L %i in (1,1,14) do type dummy.txt >> dummy.txt

(Run the above two commands one after another or you can add them to a batch file.)

The above commands create a 1 MB file dummy.txt within few seconds...

  • The link points to fsutil file createnew filename length – Thomas Ahle Apr 16 '14 at 10:59
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    Extract from the link above: If you want to create a file with real data then you can use the below command line script. echo "This is just a sample line appended to create a big file.. " > dummy.txt for /L %i in (1,1,14) do type dummy.txt >> dummy.txt (Run the above two commands one after another or you can add them to a batch file.) The above commands create a 1 MB file dummy.txt within few seconds. – Tony Stark Aug 26 '14 at 9:08
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    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Evaldas Buinauskas Oct 20 '17 at 6:54
  • Attention: You must copy the first line first, hit Enter and than copy the second line. I tried copying the whole script into my shell but then nothing happed. – Magiranu Nov 20 '17 at 10:20

Check out RDFC http://www.bertel.de/software/rdfc/index-en.html

RDFC is probably not the fastest, but it does allocate data blocks. The absolutely fastest would have to use lower level API to just obtain cluster chains and put them into MFT without writing data.

Beware that there's no silver bullet here - if "creation" returns instantly that means you got a sparse file which just fakes a large file, but you won't get data blocks/chains till you write into it. If you just read is you'd get very fast zeros which could make you believe that your drive all of the sudden got blazingly fast :-)

  • This seems to be the best answer. FSUTIL creates a sparse file which is not a valid test scenario for many cases. Sysinternals contig never seems to work for me, when I use a command like "contig -n largefile.bin 6000000000 it creates a file 1.7GB in size...??? Thanks for RDFC because it worked perfectly the first try and writes at the max write speed of my ATA disk. – Syclone0044 Jun 18 '13 at 1:41
  • For me this is the best util. Simple and works correctly. – Fire-Dragon-DoL Jan 4 '14 at 20:14

Check the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools. There is a utility called Creatfil.

 CREATFIL.EXE
 -? : This message
 -FileName -- name of the new file
 -FileSize -- size of file in KBytes, default is 1024 KBytes

It is the similar to mkfile on Solaris.

  • I'd rather not have to download the resource kit. – Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 18:42
  • you would only need the 1 exe from the resource kit, you don't have to have the whole thing on your production system. – Byron Whitlock Jun 11 '09 at 18:51
  • I'll give it a try, but I'd rather not have the additional file dependency. – Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 19:30
  • The file isn't downloading correctly for me now, but I can't imagine it being faster than the Contig tool mentioned by Johannes Rossel. – Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 21:30
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    Thanks! The downloaded package is rktools.exe and it's 11.7 MB and 18.2 MB when expanded. Oh, and that's "creatfil.exe" and not "createfil.exe". This file alone is 5.5 KB in size and that's all you really need. It took me less than 1 minute to generate a 1 GB file on a quad core 3.0 GHz Intel cpu. With the fsutil.exe tool as posted above, it only takes a fraction of a second to create it. So it's true, that tool creates sparse files. It's even bigger, it's 73,5 KB. This one is better for generating large files for testing purposes. – Samir Nov 2 '13 at 17:45

I needed a regular 10 GB file for testing, so I couldn't use fsutil because it creates sparse files (thanks @ZXX).

@echo off

:: Create file with 2 bytes
echo.>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 KB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 9) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 MB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 10) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 1 GB
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 10) do type file-big.txt>>file-big.txt

:: Expand to 4 GB
del file-4gb.txt
for /L %%i in (1, 1, 4) do type file-big.txt>>file-4gb.txt

del file-big.txt

I wanted to create a 10 GB file, but for some reason it only showed up as 4 GB, so I wanted to be safe and stopped at 4 GB. If you really want to be sure your file will be handled properly by the operating system and other applications, stop expanding it at 1 GB.

  • You need to use a single percent character, not double. Also, you don't need the extra spaces in the parentheses. I'll edit that for you. – Samir Nov 2 '13 at 21:19
  • What operating system did you use here mate? The rm is a Unix/Linux command, while del is a DOS/Windows command?... – Samir Nov 2 '13 at 21:39
  • Is this supposed to be a batch file or are you supposed to issue these commands straight up in cmd? Single percent sign is used in cmd, like %i but in a batch file you use double percent sign, like %%i. – Samir Nov 2 '13 at 21:50
  • @Sammy: It starts with @echo off, so it's obviously a .bat. That's why it had double percent signs. – f.ardelian Nov 2 '13 at 21:52
  • Alright, then we might want to bring back the double percent sign. Why do you delete file-4gb.txt before you create it? Wouldn't that result in error? Did you actually meant to create file-4gb.txt on that line? Or rename the old file-big.txt file? This is unclear, even for a batch file. If you meant to rename it, then the command you were looking for is probably ren. Like ren file-big.txt file-4gb.txt. I think you confused that with rm. – Samir Nov 2 '13 at 22:01

Use:

/*
Creates an empty file, which can take all of the disk
space. Just specify the desired file size on the
command line.
*/

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (int argc, char* ARGV[])
{
    int size;
    size = atoi(ARGV[1]);
    const char* full = "fulldisk.dsk";
    HANDLE hf = CreateFile(full,
                           GENERIC_WRITE,
                           0,
                           0,
                           CREATE_ALWAYS,
                           0,
                           0);
    SetFilePointer(hf, size, 0, FILE_BEGIN);
    SetEndOfFile(hf);
    CloseHandle(hf);
    return 0;
}
  • What is int? Will this work for a 5 GB file? Is this limited to 2 or 4 GB? That the third parameter to SetFilePointer() is 0 suggests it will not work for a 5 GB file. – Peter Mortensen Sep 8 at 21:01

I found an excellent utility that is configurable at https://github.com/SL5R0/GenFile.

It fills the target file with random data, so there are no problems with sparse files, and for my purposes (testing compression algorithms) it gives a nice level of white noise.

  • This utility is a single file Java application that should work on any platform with Java. – Paul Jul 23 '12 at 3:07
  • @MusikPolice - Link is dead – dcp Aug 14 at 19:40
  • Noted. Unfortunately, that's bound to happen after six years. – MusikPolice Sep 19 at 19:37

Open up Windows Task Manager, find the biggest process you have running right click, and click on Create dump file.

This will create a file relative to the size of the process in memory in your temporary folder.

You can easily create a file sized in gigabytes.

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  • 1
    nice solution! Helpful if you have a variety of applications running, to get different sizes – mmcrae May 12 '17 at 14:57

PowerShell one-liner to create a file in C:\Temp to fill disk C: leaving only 10 MB:

[io.file]::Create("C:\temp\bigblob.txt").SetLength((gwmi Win32_LogicalDisk -Filter "DeviceID='C:'").FreeSpace - 10MB).Close
  • 2
    will it create file with some real content or sparse file? – Samselvaprabu Dec 30 '17 at 7:30

Short of writing a full application, us Python guys can achieve files of any size with four lines, same snippet on Windows and Linux (the os.stat() line is just a check):

>>> f = open('myfile.txt','w')
>>> f.seek(1024-1) # an example, pick any size
>>> f.write('\x00')
>>> f.close()
>>> os.stat('myfile.txt').st_size
1024L
>>>
  • Installing Python to solve one problem is really overkill. Why not just use something built in such as Powershell or C# - gist.github.com/nadams810/6539070 (you don't even need Visual Studio to compile C# applications). – Nathan Adams Sep 12 '13 at 15:26
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    .Net, C# and Powershell are not necessarily cross platform. – gimel Sep 12 '13 at 16:48
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    They are built into Windows which is what the OP asked for (assuming your system is fully up to date). – Nathan Adams Sep 12 '13 at 18:22

Plain ol' C... this builds under MinGW GCC on Windows XX and should work on any 'generic' C platform.

It generates a null file of a specified size. The resultant file is NOT just a directory space-occupier entry, and in fact occupies the specified number of bytes. This is fast because no actual writes occur except for the byte written before close.

My instance produces a file full of zeros - this could vary by platform; this program essentially sets up the directory structure for whatever data is hanging around.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

FILE *file;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    unsigned long  size;

    if(argc!=3)
    {
        printf("Error ... syntax: Fillerfile  size  Fname \n\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    size = atoi(&*argv[1]);

    printf("Creating %d byte file '%s'...\n", size, &*argv[2]);

    if(!(file = fopen(&*argv[2], "w+")))
    {
        printf("Error opening file %s!\n\n", &*argv[2]);
        exit(1);
    }

    fseek(file, size-1, SEEK_SET);
    fprintf(file, "%c", 0x00);
    fclose(file);
}
  • I suggest you to check how I formatted your code. And BTW. the question already has a very good answer, and the fseek+fwrite was already presented in Pyton and WinAPI so this is little of a help. It's nice however you've provided a complete example. +1 for that. But try to not re-answer already solved questions, its just waste of the time in which you could help someone a bit more :) – quetzalcoatl Aug 10 '12 at 22:34

I was looking for a way to create a large dummy file with space allocation recently. All of the solutions look awkward. Finally I just started the DISKPART utility in Windows (embedded since Windows Vista):

DISKPART
CREATE VDISK FILE="C:\test.vhd" MAXIMUM=20000 TYPE=FIXED

Where MAXIMUM is the resulting file size, 20 GB here.

  • Best Solution thus far. – Frank FYC Oct 30 '17 at 22:07
  • Doesn't work for me. No file is created unfortunately. I tried with administrator priviliges. – Magiranu Nov 20 '17 at 10:11

I found a solution using DEBUG at http://www.scribd.com/doc/445750/Create-a-Huge-File, but I don't know an easy way to script it and it doesn't seem to be able to create files larger than 1 GB.

  • 1
    can't you create 5 files and then append them ? Create them simultaniously using threading, and then append them :D – dassouki Jun 11 '09 at 18:44
  • I don't know if I could thread it without doing programming, but yes, I can copy the file a few times to get the size I need. In my case I don't need the file itself to be 5GB, just the space used up. – Leigh Riffel Jun 11 '09 at 18:51
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    Writing to multiple files using threading sounds like a terrible idea, given how slow hard drives are ... Also, appending them is fairly expensive in terms of time so that probably fails the "quick" criteria. – Joey Jun 11 '09 at 19:14

... 1 MB file dummy.txt within few seconds.

echo "This is just a sample line appended to create a big file.. " > dummy.txt for /L %i in (1,1,14) do type dummy.txt >> dummy.txt

See here : http://www.windows-commandline.com/how-to-create-large-dummy-file/

Temp files should be stored in the Windows Temp Folder. Based on the answer from Rod you can use the following one liner to create a 5 GB temp file which returns the filename

[System.IO.Path]::GetTempFileName() | % { [System.IO.File]::Create($_).SetLength(5gb).Close;$_ } | ? { $_ }

Explanation:

  • [System.IO.Path]::GetTempFileName() generates a random filename with random extension in the Windows Temp Folder
  • The Pipeline is used to pass the name to [System.IO.File]::Create($_) which creates the file
  • The file name is set to the newly created file with .SetLength(5gb). I was a bit surprised to discover, that PowerShell supports Byte Conversion, which is really helpful.
  • The file handle needs to be closed with .close to allow other applications to access it
  • With ;$_ the filename is returned and with | ? { $_ } it is ensured that only the filename is returned and not the empty string returned by [System.IO.File]::Create($_)

Simple answer in Python: If you need to create a large real text file I just used a simple while loop and was able to create a 5 GB file in about 20 seconds. I know it's crude, but it is fast enough.

outfile = open("outfile.log", "a+")

def write(outfile):
    outfile.write("hello world hello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello worldhello world"+"\n")
    return

i=0
while i < 1000000:
    write(outfile)
    i += 1
outfile.close()

You can try this C++ code:

    #include<stdlib.h>
    #include<iostream>
    #include<conio.h>
    #include<fstream>
    #using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        int a;
        ofstream fcout ("big_file.txt");
        for(;;a += 1999999999){
            do{
                fcout << a;
            }
            while(!a);
        }
    }

Maybe it will take some time to generate depending on your CPU speed...

  • The poster asked quickly. This would require installing a C++ compiler. – user1537415 Feb 19 '15 at 13:34

Quick to execute or quick to type on a keyboard? If you use Python on Windows, you can try this:

cmd /k py -3 -c "with open(r'C:\Users\LRiffel\BigFile.bin', 'wb') as file: file.truncate(5 * 1 << 30)"

I've made some additions to the same fsutil method as mentioned in the chosen answer. This is to create files of many different extensions and/or of various sizes.

set file_list=avi bmp doc docm docx eps gif jpeg jpg key m4v mov mp4 mpg msg nsf odt pdf png pps ppsx ppt pptx rar rtf tif tiff txt wmv xls xlsb xlsm xlsx xps zip 7z
set file_size= 1
for %%f in (%file_list%) do (
fsutil file createnew valid_%%f.%%f %file_size%
) > xxlogs.txt

The code can be cloned from https://github.com/iamakidilam/bulkFileCreater.git

protected by lpapp Jun 27 '14 at 1:51

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