65

Suppose you have a LIST datatype in Redis. How do you delete all its entries? I've tried this already:

LTRIM key 0 0
LTRIM key -1 0

Both of those leave the first element. This will leave all the elements:

LTRIM key 0 -1

I don't see a separate command to completely empty a list.

  • 2
    @DavidJames: Consider it another way of spelling "foo." I'm following the convention used in Redis's own documentation: redis.io/commands – Paul A Jungwirth Aug 13 '12 at 19:59
  • Yes, in redis, all data structures are keys. That doesn't mean 'key' is useful in an example. Quite the opposite, I think. Using mylist would make your question clearer. For example, redis.io/commands/ltrim writes: LTRIM mylist 1 -1. The page you cite is a command reference and should not be considered a "convention" for making good examples. – David J. Aug 13 '12 at 20:41
110

Delete the key, and that will clear all items. Not having the list at all is similar to not having any items in it. Redis will not throw any exceptions when you try to access a non-existent key.

DEL key

Here's some console logs.

redis> KEYS *
(empty list or set)
redis> LPUSH names John
(integer) 1
redis> LPUSH names Mary
(integer) 2
redis> LPUSH names Alice
(integer) 3
redis> LLEN names
(integer) 3
redis> LRANGE names 0 2
1) "Alice"
2) "Mary"
3) "John"
redis> DEL names
(integer) 1
redis> LLEN names
(integer) 0
redis> LRANGE names 0 2
(empty list or set)
  • Is there a way to do that in one atomic operation? (both "LRANGE names 0 2" and "DEL names") – refaelos Oct 14 '13 at 10:44
  • Yes. See Redis transactions - redis.io/topics/transactions – Anurag Oct 14 '13 at 21:20
  • 1
    One thing, using Del may create extra overhead, Time complexity: O(N) where N is the number of keys that will be removed. When a key to remove holds a value other than a string, the individual complexity for this key is O(M) where M is the number of elements in the list, set, sorted set or hash. Removing a single key that holds a string value is O(1). The docs – ChewOnThis_Trident May 15 '14 at 22:46
  • 1
    this method is dangerous as it also remove the ttl of the key – Saitama Mar 1 '16 at 15:11
14

You can remove all values in the List only if the List has more than one value

LTRIM key -1 0

Example:

redis 127.0.0.1:6379> RPUSH mylist four 1 3 1
(integer) 4
redis 127.0.0.1:6379> KEYS *
1) "newKey"
2) "firstHash"
3) "secondList"
4) "test4"
5) "firstList"
6) "mylist"
redis 127.0.0.1:6379> LTRIM mylist -1 0
OK
redis 127.0.0.1:6379> LRANGE mylist 0 -1
(empty list or set)
redis 127.0.0.1:6379> KEYS *
1) "newKey"
2) "firstHash"
3) "secondList"
4) "test4"
5) "firstList"

But if the List has one value only , you must use

DEL key 
3

Just use LTRIM. ...Aaaand the magic here is to use start greater than end.

LTRIM key 99 0

And...boom! there goes the whole list of elements. Just * pooof * right in front of your eyes!! No residue remaining, and absolutely no questions asked.

Note: This will cause the key to be "removed"(as in deleted) as described here

...if start is larger than the end of the list, or start > end, the result will be an empty list (which causes key to be removed).

  • Is there a reason you prefer this over DEL key as in @Anurag's answer? It seems like they have the same effect. – Paul A Jungwirth Jul 24 '18 at 15:42
  • Frankly no, didn't get the time to look into the benchmarks, was just reading the docs when I discovered the above method, thought might as well mention it. – Mohd Abdul Mujib Jul 24 '18 at 15:55
  • 1
    Okay, thanks! Upvoted because I can imagine algorithms that use LTRIM repeatedly, and it's good to know what happens when the second parameter falls below the first. I can see how exploiting this behavior could make some code more elegant. – Paul A Jungwirth Jul 24 '18 at 17:13
0

Am answering on my phone so can't actually format the answer well.

This might be a late response but am sticking it here just in case someone still needs that functionality.

Short answer

ltrim mylist 0 - (n+1) where mylist is key and n is length of mylist.

Long answer

The way ltrim works is that, it takes two indices and return the elements that fall between them inclusive of the indices.

Ltrim list startIndex endIndex

Example assuming we have a redis list with key mylist containing 10 entries:

ltrim mylist 0 5 will trim the list to elements starting from index 0 through to index 5. And discard those that fall outside that range.

Fortunately redis list operations support negative indexing which proves extremely useful in some situations. Typically when you don't know the length of the list.

-1 refers to last element, - 2 penultimate element, etc. And (-n) is the first element.

Out of range indexes are not harmful. If the end index is greater than length of the list, redis treats it as equal to last index.

This is why ltrim mylist 0, -(n +1) clear the list. It does so because (-n) is equivalent to index 0. Adding 1 to it leaves no element within that range since that will be before the first element.

  • Thanks for sharing your insights. As an extension to your answer, you could simply supply a value of N that is sufficiently larger than the list to guarantee that all items are deleted. For example ltrim mylist 0 -99999. – Dave Johnson Jan 6 '18 at 0:09
0

I tried this and it works for me. Just change myList for your list name and execute it redis-cli KEYS "myList:*" | xargs redis-cli DEL

  • 1
    Although this works, keys is an extremely heavy operation that involves parsing every single key in your database, which is quite unnecessary in this case, or rather in most cases – Adalcar Nov 14 '18 at 10:29
-1

the accepted answer is wrong. suppose i have

redis 127.0.0.1:6379> KEYS * 
1) "newKey" 
2) "firstHash" 
3) "secondList" 
4) "test4" 
5) "firstList" 
6) "mylist" 

to use ahmed's example, which is actually correct. now, if i do:

DEL 'test4'

i end up with:

1) "newKey" 
2) "firstHash" 
3) "secondList" 
4) "firstList" 
5) "mylist"` 

so, i did not remove all entries from the 'test4' list, i removed test4 itself. not the same thing. not at all. i have a little app where the list keys are hashes computed from several data(well, aren't they all?), those lists sometimes are cleared, but the semantics of a empty list and a non-existent list are very different. so, no, i do not want to DEL 'myhashes', i want just to remove all entries.

beware, oh ye who wanders here.

  • If you look at the page cited below you'll see that in fact the semantics ARE the same! Taken from: The LPUSH command inserts a new element on the head, while RPUSH inserts a new element on the tail. A new list is created when one of this operations is performed against an empty key. Similarly the key is removed from the key space if a list operation will empty the list. These are very handy semantics since all the list commands will behave exactly like they were called with an empty list if called with a non-existing key as argument. – Dominic Jan 20 '14 at 8:46
  • from the horses mouth: "Similarly the key is removed from the key space if a list operation will empty the list." so, is { [], [], [] } === { [] } ? not for me. i guess we're in different topological spaces.... :) – deimosaffair Jan 22 '14 at 8:59
  • Well the initial question was how to delete an entire List in redis. so if you either delete the key or delete all entries and have the key automatically removed by redis gives the same result. So I'm not sure what you mean with { [], [], [] } === { [] }. – Dominic Jan 23 '14 at 9:49
  • Removing the last element from list is equal to deleting the key. This link even same for LIST as well (tested with RPOPLPUSH) bennadel.com/blog/… – Kanagavelu Sugumar Aug 3 '17 at 16:45

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