707

I have to update a field with a value which is returned by a join of 3 tables.

Example:

select
    im.itemid
    ,im.sku as iSku
    ,gm.SKU as GSKU
    ,mm.ManufacturerId as ManuId
    ,mm.ManufacturerName
    ,im.mf_item_number
    ,mm.ManufacturerID
from 
    item_master im, group_master gm, Manufacturer_Master mm 
where
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    and im.sku=gm.sku
    and gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
    and gm.manufacturerID=34

I want to update the mf_item_number field values of table item_master with some other value which is joined in the above condition.

How can I do this in MS SQL Server?

2
  • 131
    Please stop using those implied joins to begin with. It's a poor technique that leads to incorrect results due to unexpected cross joins. This code style is 18 years out of date – HLGEM Feb 3 '10 at 15:42
  • 2
    See also SO question ... stackoverflow.com/questions/1293330/… – SteveC Jun 14 '13 at 14:49

12 Answers 12

1317
UPDATE im
SET mf_item_number = gm.SKU --etc
FROM item_master im
JOIN group_master gm
    ON im.sku = gm.sku 
JOIN Manufacturer_Master mm
    ON gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
WHERE im.mf_item_number like 'STA%' AND
      gm.manufacturerID = 34

To make it clear... The UPDATE clause can refer to an table alias specified in the FROM clause. So im in this case is valid

Generic example

UPDATE A
SET foo = B.bar
FROM TableA A
JOIN TableB B
    ON A.col1 = B.colx
WHERE ...
2
  • 11
    Postgres complains about UPDATE im; im is an alias that Postgres doesn't recognise :/ – fatuhoku Nov 10 '16 at 15:57
  • 12
    FYI this will NOT work in MySQL (different syntax)! For MySQL have a look at gcbenison's answer – Sliq Jan 17 '17 at 16:28
70

Adapting this to MySQL -- there is no FROM clause in UPDATE, but this works:

UPDATE
    item_master im
    JOIN
    group_master gm ON im.sku=gm.sku 
    JOIN
    Manufacturer_Master mm ON gm.ManufacturerID=mm.ManufacturerID
SET
    im.mf_item_number = gm.SKU --etc
WHERE
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    AND
    gm.manufacturerID=34
0
69

One of the easiest way is to use a common table expression (since you're already on SQL 2005):

with cte as (
select
    im.itemid
    ,im.sku as iSku
    ,gm.SKU as GSKU
    ,mm.ManufacturerId as ManuId
    ,mm.ManufacturerName
    ,im.mf_item_number
    ,mm.ManufacturerID
    , <your other field>
from 
    item_master im, group_master gm, Manufacturer_Master mm 
where
    im.mf_item_number like 'STA%'
    and im.sku=gm.sku
    and gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
    and gm.manufacturerID=34)
update cte set mf_item_number = <your other field>

The query execution engine will figure out on its own how to update the record.

3
  • 8
    Excellent, the use of the CTE makes it simple to convert the original SELECT into an UPDATE – SteveC Jun 14 '13 at 14:48
  • 4
    Works as long as your SELECT query does not have any aggregates, DISTINCT, etc. – Baodad May 20 '15 at 23:41
  • 1
    I usually start with semicolon to terminate previous statement (if any). CTE rocks ! Simple to design complicated query / joined updates. I use it all the time... – Adam W Dec 17 '15 at 5:19
13

Did not use your sql above but here is an example of updating a table based on a join statement.

UPDATE p
SET    p.category = c.category
FROM   products p
       INNER JOIN prodductcatagories pg
            ON  p.productid = pg.productid
       INNER JOIN categories c
            ON  pg.categoryid = c.cateogryid
WHERE  c.categories LIKE 'whole%'
8

You can specify additional tables used in determining how and what to update with the "FROM " clause in the UPDATE statement, like this:

update item_master
set mf_item_number = (some value)
from 
   group_master as gm
   join Manufacturar_Master as mm ON ........
where
 .... (your conditions here)

In the WHERE clause, you need to provide the conditions and join operations to bind these tables together.

Marc

2
  • 5
    ..or use ANSI JOINS in the FROM clause – gbn Jun 11 '09 at 18:59
  • 5
    Yes please use the ansi joins, you could be in real trouble in an update if you accidentally got a cross join. – HLGEM Jun 11 '09 at 19:01
7

MySQL: In general, make necessary changes par your requirement:

UPDATE
    shopping_cart sc
    LEFT JOIN
    package pc ON sc. package_id = pc.id    
SET
    sc. amount = pc.amount
0
2

Try like this...

Update t1.Column1 = value 
from tbltemp as t1 
inner join tblUser as t2 on t2.ID = t1.UserID 
where t1.[column1]=value and t2.[Column1] = value;
1
  • that's not even syntactically correct, while the much older accepted answer is not only syntactically correct but solves the exact question asked. – Auspex Sep 3 '20 at 16:16
2

You can use the following query:

UPDATE im
SET mf_item_number = (some value) 
FROM item_master im
JOIN group_master gm
    ON im.sku = gm.sku 
JOIN Manufacturer_Master mm
    ON gm.ManufacturerID = mm.ManufacturerID
WHERE im.mf_item_number like 'STA%' AND
      gm.manufacturerID = 34    `sql`
2

It is very simple to update using join query in SQL .You can do it without using FROM clause. Here is an example :

    UPDATE customer_table c 

      JOIN  
          employee_table e
          ON c.city_id = e.city_id  
      JOIN 
          anyother_ table a
          ON a.someID = e.someID

    SET c.active = "Yes"

    WHERE c.city = "New york";
1

You can update with MERGE Command with much more control over MATCHED and NOT MATCHED:(I slightly changed the source code to demonstrate my point)

USE tempdb;
GO
IF(OBJECT_ID('target') > 0)DROP TABLE dbo.target
IF(OBJECT_ID('source') > 0)DROP TABLE dbo.source
CREATE TABLE dbo.Target
    (
      EmployeeID INT ,
      EmployeeName VARCHAR(100) ,
      CONSTRAINT Target_PK PRIMARY KEY ( EmployeeID )
    );
CREATE TABLE dbo.Source
    (
      EmployeeID INT ,
      EmployeeName VARCHAR(100) ,
      CONSTRAINT Source_PK PRIMARY KEY ( EmployeeID )
    );
GO
INSERT  dbo.Target
        ( EmployeeID, EmployeeName )
VALUES  ( 100, 'Mary' );
INSERT  dbo.Target
        ( EmployeeID, EmployeeName )
VALUES  ( 101, 'Sara' );
INSERT  dbo.Target
        ( EmployeeID, EmployeeName )
VALUES  ( 102, 'Stefano' );

GO
INSERT  dbo.Source
        ( EmployeeID, EmployeeName )
VALUES  ( 100, 'Bob' );
INSERT  dbo.Source
        ( EmployeeID, EmployeeName )
VALUES  ( 104, 'Steve' );
GO

SELECT * FROM dbo.Source
SELECT * FROM dbo.Target

MERGE Target AS T
USING Source AS S
ON ( T.EmployeeID = S.EmployeeID )
WHEN MATCHED THEN
    UPDATE SET T.EmployeeName = S.EmployeeName + '[Updated]';
GO 
SELECT '-------After Merge----------'
SELECT * FROM dbo.Source
SELECT * FROM dbo.Target
1
  • Not, I'm pretty sure, in SQL Server 2005, which is what the question is tagged as, but this is the best (i.e, more standard) way on modern SQL Server versions – Auspex Sep 3 '20 at 16:17
1

If you are using SQL Server you can update one table from other table without specifying a join and simply link the two tables from the where clause. This makes a much simpler SQL query:

 UPDATE Table1
    SET Table1.col1 = Table2.col1,
        Table1.col2 = Table2.col2
    FROM
        Table2
    WHERE
        Table1.id = Table2.id
0

Let me just add a warning to all the existing answers:

When using the SELECT ... FROM syntax, you should keep in mind that it is proprietary syntax for T-SQL and is non-deterministic. The worst part is, that you get no warning or error, it just executes smoothly.

Full explanation with example is in the documentation:

Use caution when specifying the FROM clause to provide the criteria for the update operation. The results of an UPDATE statement are undefined if the statement includes a FROM clause that is not specified in such a way that only one value is available for each column occurrence that is updated, that is if the UPDATE statement is not deterministic.

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