76

I have a Java class MyPojo that I am interested in deserializing from JSON. I have configured a special MixIn class, MyPojoDeMixIn, to assist me with the deserialization. MyPojo has only int and String instance variables combined with proper getters and setters. MyPojoDeMixIn looks something like this:

public abstract class MyPojoDeMixIn {
  MyPojoDeMixIn(
      @JsonProperty("JsonName1") int prop1,
      @JsonProperty("JsonName2") int prop2,
      @JsonProperty("JsonName3") String prop3) {}
}

In my test client I do the following, but of course it does not work at compile time because there is a JsonMappingException related to a type mismatch.

ObjectMapper m = new ObjectMapper();
m.getDeserializationConfig().addMixInAnnotations(MyPojo.class,MyPojoDeMixIn.class);
try { ArrayList<MyPojo> arrayOfPojo = m.readValue(response, MyPojo.class); }
catch (Exception e) { System.out.println(e) }

I am aware that I could alleviate this issue by creating a "Response" object that has only an ArrayList<MyPojo> in it, but then I would have to create these somewhat useless objects for every single type I want to return.

I also looked online at JacksonInFiveMinutes but had a terrible time understanding the stuff about Map<A,B> and how it relates to my issue. If you cannot tell, I'm entirely new to Java and come from an Obj-C background. They specifically mention:

In addition to binding to POJOs and "simple" types, there is one additional variant: that of binding to generic (typed) containers. This case requires special handling due to so-called Type Erasure (used by Java to implement generics in somewhat backwards compatible way), which prevents you from using something like Collection.class (which does not compile).

So if you want to bind data into a Map you will need to use:

Map<String,User> result = mapper.readValue(src, new TypeReference<Map<String,User>>() { });

How can I deserialize directly to ArrayList?

130

You can deserialize directly to a list by using the TypeReference wrapper. An example method:

public static <T> T fromJSON(final TypeReference<T> type,
      final String jsonPacket) {
   T data = null;

   try {
      data = new ObjectMapper().readValue(jsonPacket, type);
   } catch (Exception e) {
      // Handle the problem
   }
   return data;
}

And is used thus:

final String json = "";
Set<POJO> properties = fromJSON(new TypeReference<Set<POJO>>() {}, json);

TypeReference Javadoc

  • Your answer seems related to their info on how to use the built-in support for TypeReference - I just don't get how to do it... Please see my edit above for their instructions on how to use generics. – tacos_tacos_tacos Mar 22 '12 at 20:04
  • Well, it is related. But this is a snippet from working code in production. Forget about your mixin, just use the code I've shown (but replace POJO of course with the name of your actual bean class). – Perception Mar 22 '12 at 20:07
  • Your code compiled, but I get a run time exception when attempting to print out the arrayList.toString() about a NullPointerException. I'm guessing that this could be because my POJO does not conform to the right naming conventions for its properties, that is, the whole issue is that the web service returns Prop1Member and my object has Prop1. This is the only real reason I'm using mixins to begin with, so I do not have to put the declarations for @JsonProperty in my pure objects. – tacos_tacos_tacos Mar 22 '12 at 20:19
  • 1
    Visually inspect your array to make sure you got back a list at least. And if need be add the mixin back, which should work along with the TypeReference to get everything neatly deserialized. – Perception Mar 22 '12 at 20:27
  • 2
    @JsonProperty is not as evil as people make it out too be. It's hard to get away from vendor specific annotations what with the current state of standardization (minimal) in the field. – Perception Mar 22 '12 at 21:19
83

Another way is to use an array as a type, e.g.:

ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
MyPojo[] pojos = objectMapper.readValue(json, MyPojo[].class);

This way you avoid all the hassle with the Type object, and if you really need a list you can always convert the array to a list by:

List<MyPojo> pojoList = Arrays.asList(pojos);

IMHO this is much more readable.

And to make it be an actual list (that can be modified, see limitations of Arrays.asList()) then just do the following:

List<MyPojo> mcList = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(pojos));
  • 6
    This should be the accepted answer, simple and much more readable indeed. – dic19 Jan 12 '17 at 20:18
  • Agreed^ This was way more helpful – Chris Staikos Jul 6 '17 at 15:18
  • 1
    Elegant sure, but I am unable to generify it because of MyPojo[].class , which I don't want to pass in as a parameter. – Adrian Redgers May 31 at 9:59
  • I think using TypeFactory as described in the next answer: stackoverflow.com/a/42458104/91497 is the Jackson way to specify the type. – Jmini Aug 6 at 10:30
19

This variant looks more simple and elegant.

CollectionType typeReference =
    TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructCollectionType(List.class, Dto.class);
List<Dto> resultDto = objectMapper.readValue(content, typeReference);
3

I am also having the same problem. I have a json which is to be converted to ArrayList.

Account looks like this.

Account{
  Person p ;
  Related r ;

}

Person{
    String Name ;
    Address a ;
}

All of the above classes have been annotated properly. I have tried TypeReference>() {} but is not working.

It gives me Arraylist but ArrayList has a linkedHashMap which contains some more linked hashmaps containing final values.

My code is as Follows:

public T unmarshal(String responseXML,String c)
{
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

    AnnotationIntrospector introspector = new JacksonAnnotationIntrospector();

    mapper.getDeserializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);

    mapper.getSerializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);
    try
    {
      this.targetclass = (T) mapper.readValue(responseXML,  new TypeReference<ArrayList<T>>() {});
    }
    catch (JsonParseException e)
    {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
    catch (JsonMappingException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return this.targetclass;
}

I finally solved the problem. I am able to convert the List in Json String directly to ArrayList as follows:

JsonMarshallerUnmarshaller<T>{

     T targetClass ;

     public ArrayList<T> unmarshal(String jsonString)
     {
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

        AnnotationIntrospector introspector = new JacksonAnnotationIntrospector();

        mapper.getDeserializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);

        mapper.getSerializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);
        JavaType type = mapper.getTypeFactory().
                    constructCollectionType(ArrayList.class, targetclass.getClass()) ;
        try
        {
        Class c1 = this.targetclass.getClass() ;
        Class c2 = this.targetclass1.getClass() ;
            ArrayList<T> temp = (ArrayList<T>) mapper.readValue(jsonString,  type);
        return temp ;
        }
       catch (JsonParseException e)
       {
        e.printStackTrace();
       }
       catch (JsonMappingException e) {
           e.printStackTrace();
       } catch (IOException e) {
          e.printStackTrace();
       }

     return null ;
    }  

}
0

This works for me.

@Test
public void cloneTest() {
    List<Part> parts = new ArrayList<Part>();
    Part part1 = new Part(1);
    parts.add(part1);
    Part part2 = new Part(2);
    parts.add(part2);
    try {
        ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
        String jsonStr = objectMapper.writeValueAsString(parts);

        List<Part> cloneParts = objectMapper.readValue(jsonStr, new TypeReference<ArrayList<Part>>() {});
    } catch (Exception e) {
        //fail("failed.");
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    //TODO: Assert: compare both list values.
}

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