98

I don't know how to merge rows and columns inside HTML tables.

Example

Can you please help me with making such a table in HTML?

4
  • Merge them right? You mean colspan?
    – animuson
    Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:07
  • @DavidThomas I can make table with 5 rows and 3 columns. But I don't really know where to apply rowspan, etc.
    – Max Frai
    Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:07
  • 14
    @DAvid: It seems pretty clear the asker doesn't know where to begin, it's sometimes hard when you don't even know if an attribute that you're looking for exists (rowspan in this case) Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:10
  • 6
    A good way to lean about this, if you are lucky enough to have a visual editor like Dreamweaver, is to create the basic table grid and then merge together the needed cells. Then inspect the code that has been produced. You'll see where the various cells are merged and how it's done with code. Dreamweaver typically produces clean and compliant code, so it will set a good example for a learner. Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:42

11 Answers 11

120

If you're confused how table layouts work, they basically start at x=0, y=0 and work their way across. Let's explain with graphics, because they're so much fun!

When you start a table, you make a grid. Your first row and cell will be in the top left corner. Think of it like an array pointer, moving to the right with each incremented value of x, and moving down with each incremented value of y.

For your first row, you're only defining two cells. One spans 2 rows down and one spans 4 columns across. So when you reach the end of your first row, it looks something like this:

Preview #0001

<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Now that the row has ended, the "array pointer" jumps down to the next row. Since x position 0 is already taken up by a previous cell, x jumps to position 1 to start filling in cells. * See note about difference between rowspans.

This row has four cells in it which are all 1x1 blocks, filling in the same width of the row above it.

Preview #0002

<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

The next row is all 1x1 cells. But, for example, what if you added an extra cell? Well, it would just pop off the edge to the right.

Preview #0003

<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

* But what if we instead (rather than adding the extra cell) made all these cells have a rowspan of 2? The thing you need to consider here is that even though you're not going to be adding any more cells in the next row, the row still must exist (even though it's an empty row). If you did try to add new cells in the row immediately after, you'd notice that it would start adding them to the end of the bottom row.

Preview #0004

<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td colspan="4"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
        <td rowspan="2"></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Enjoy the wonderful world of creating tables!

0
113

I'd suggest:

table {
    empty-cells: show;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}

table td,
table th {
    min-width: 2em;
    min-height: 2em;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
<table>
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th rowspan="2"></th>
            <th colspan="4">&nbsp;</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>I</th>
            <th>II</th>
            <th>III</th>
            <th>IIII</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td></td>
            <td>1</td>
            <td>2</td>
            <td>3</td>
            <td>4</td>
         </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

References:

3
  • 2
    Don't forget to add the pretty colors. Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:11
  • 31
    I leave the 'pretty colours' as an exercise for the reader in this case. Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 21:19
  • If anyone is interested, how this works in general, see @animousons's excellent explanation below stackoverflow.com/a/9830847/362951
    – mit
    Commented Aug 7, 2018 at 10:13
14

If anyone is looking for a rowspan on both the left AND on the right, here is how you can do it:

table { 
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

td {
    padding: 20px; 
    border: 1px solid black; 
    text-align: center;
}
<table>
    <tbody>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2">LEFT</td>
        <td> 1 </td>
        <td> 2 </td>
        <td> 3 </td>
        <td> 4 </td>
        <td rowspan="2">RIGHT</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td> 5 </td>
        <td> 6 </td>
        <td> 7 </td>
        <td> 8 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
    </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

Alternatively, if you want to add the LEFT and RIGHT to an existing rowset, you can achieve the same result by throwing them in with a collapsed colspan in between:

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

td {
    padding: 20px; 
    border: 1px solid black; 
    text-align: center;
}
<table>
    <tbody>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="3">LEFT</td>
        <td colspan="4" style="padding: 0; border-bottom: solid 1px transparent;"></td>
        <td rowspan="3">RIGHT</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td> 1 </td>
        <td> 2 </td>
        <td> 3 </td>
        <td> 4 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td> 5 </td>
        <td> 6 </td>
        <td> 7 </td>
        <td> 8 </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
        <td> - </td>
    </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

5

Use rowspan if you want to extend cells down and colspan to extend across.

3

You can use rowspan="n" on a td element to make it span n rows, and colspan="m" on a td element to make it span m columns.

Looks like your first td needs a rowspan="2" and the next td needs a colspan="4".

2

The property you are looking for that first td is rowspan: http://www.angelfire.com/fl5/html-tutorial/tables/tr_code.htm

<table>
<tr><td rowspan="2"></td><td colspan='4'></td></tr>
<tr><td></td><td></td><td></td><td></td></tr>
<tr><td></td><td></td><td></td><td></td><td></td></tr>
</table>
2
<style type="text/css">
     table { border:2px black dotted; margin: auto; width: 100%; }
    tr { border: 2px red dashed; }
    td { border: 1px green solid; }
</style>
<table>
    <tr>
        <td rowspan="2">x</td> 
        <td colspan="4">y</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>I</td>
        <td>II</td>
        <td>III</td>
        <td>IV</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>nothing</td>
        <td>1</td>
        <td>2</td>
        <td>3</td>
        <td>4</td>
    </tr>
</table>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
1

I have used ngIf for one of my similar logic. it is as follows:

<table>
<tr *ngFor="let object of objectData; let i= index;">
<td *ngIf="(i%(object.rowSpan))==0" [attr.rowspan]="object.rowSpan">{{object.value}}</td>
</tr>
</table>

here, i'm getting rowspan value from my model object.

0
<body>
<table>
<tr><td colspan="2" rowspan="2">1</td><td colspan="4">2</td></tr>
<tr><td>3</td><td>3</td><td>3</td><td>3</td></tr>
<tr><td colspan="2">1</td><td>3</td><td>3</td><td>3</td><td>3</td></tr>
</table>
</body>
0

Colspan and Rowspan A table is divided into rows and each row is divided into cells. In some situations we need the Table Cells span across (or merged) more than one column or row. In these situations we can use Colspan or Rowspan attributes.

Colspan The colspan attribute defines the number of columns a cell should span (or merge) horizontally. That is, you want to merge two or more Cells in a row into a single Cell.

<td colspan=2 > 

How to colspan ?

<html>
<body >
    <table border=1 >
        <tr>
            <td colspan=2 >
                Merged
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>
                Third Cell
            </td>
            <td>
                Forth Cell
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>
</html>

Rowspan The rowspan attribute specifies the number of rows a cell should span vertically. That is , you want to merge two or more Cells in the same column as a single Cell vertically.

<td rowspan=2 >

How to Rowspan ?

<html>
<body >
    <table border=1 >
        <tr>
            <td>
                First Cell
            </td>
            <td rowspan=2 >
                Merged
            </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td valign=middle>
                Third Cell
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>
</html>
-1

It is similar to your table

  <table border=1 width=50%>
<tr>
    <td rowspan="2">x</td> 
    <td colspan="4">y</td>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td bgcolor=#FFFF00 >I</td>
    <td>II</td>
    <td bgcolor=#FFFF00>III</td>
    <td>IV</td>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td>empty</td>
    <td bgcolor=#FFFF00>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td bgcolor=#FFFF00>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
</tr>

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