This question already has an answer here:

I have two branches, branch_1 and branch_2.

I want to see the differences between the two branches in Git.

marked as duplicate by jberryman, Mac, Mario Sannum, EdChum, EL Yusubov Feb 7 '13 at 22:28

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    You want something different from the straightforward git diff branch_1 branch_2? (Note, if the names branch_1 and branch_2 also name files, you need git diff branch_1 branch_2 --) – torek Mar 23 '12 at 5:53
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    The cited duplicate does not answer the question... Determining which files have changed with git diff --name-status master..branchName is markedly different than seeing the exact differences between branches with something like git diff branch_1 branch_2. Or maybe I'm missing something obvious... – jww Aug 19 '16 at 8:14
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    Agreed with @jww, this question is not a duplicate. Even if the "marked duplicate" answered this question, which it doesn't, the wording of the question is sufficiently different to make this unique. Shame on jberryman, Mac, Mario Sannum, EdChum, and ElYusubov. They are just throwing their power around. – Scott Biggs Apr 29 '17 at 0:28
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    Not only is the "duplicate" a different question, this question is the number one google match for "git diff two branches". – Rob Osborne Jun 6 '17 at 13:08
git diff branch_1..branch_2

That will produce the diff between the tips of the two branches. If you'd prefer to find the diff from their common ancestor to test, you can use three dots instead of two:

git diff branch_1...branch_2
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    The same syntax works for comparing a branch with a tag or a tag with another tag. – Daniel Zohar May 27 '13 at 7:02
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    The range syntax also works for git log. With that you can see the commit messages, and with the --patch option you can see a diff one commit at a time. – Joe Flynn Feb 10 '14 at 20:20
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    Note that you can also add a file or folder name after the above two commands. – msanford Jul 28 '14 at 16:54
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    @chiyachaiya your explanation helped me but git diff b1...b2 is not same as git diff b2...b1. For example once we started b2 from b1 and when if we make some changes to b1, git diff b2...b1 will show changes made to b1 after b2 started. If we do git diff b1...b2 it will give changes made to b2 which are not in b1. – Chintak Chhapia Feb 10 '15 at 6:45
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    If you get fatal: bad revision 'some-branch' then this is probably a remote branch. You probably need something like git diff remotes/origin/some-branch my-local-branch – Dalin Oct 13 '15 at 17:41

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