66

Is there a way in the new async dotnet 4.5 library to set a timeout on the Task.WhenAll method? I want to fetch several sources, and stop after say 5 seconds, and skip the sources that weren't finished.

12 Answers 12

108

You could combine the resulting Task with a Task.Delay() using Task.WhenAny():

await Task.WhenAny(Task.WhenAll(tasks), Task.Delay(timeout));

If you want to harvest completed tasks in case of a timeout:

var completedResults =
  tasks
  .Where(t => t.Status == TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)
  .Select(t => t.Result)
  .ToList();
9
  • This has the most upvotes, but do we know if this is now a valid approach for accomplishing this? Jul 13 '13 at 18:21
  • 8
    @CitadelCSAlum What do you mean? This code does what is being asked. If you don't believe me, you can read the documentation or try it yourself.
    – svick
    Jul 16 '13 at 1:24
  • Although this is the accepted answer, does it do exactly what was described in the question? If I understand correctly, if the timeout occurs before all the tasks are completed, then no result is received (even if some of the tasks were completed). Am I correct? I was looking for something that will allow extracting results from several tasks - taking only those that beat the timeout, regardless if the rest of tasks failed to do so. See my answer below.
    – Erez Cohen
    Aug 31 '14 at 20:12
  • 1
    @ErezCohen You're right. I guess I answered mostly the title of the question and not the body (especially the "skip the sources that weren't finished" part).
    – svick
    Aug 31 '14 at 20:20
  • 1
    @James South the two snippets can be combined by just invoking the second after the first. First you await, and then you collect the results of the completed tasks. It is possible that all tasks will be completed, or only same, or none of them. Mar 28 '20 at 7:30
25

I think a clearer, more robust option that also does exception handling right would be to use Task.WhenAny on each task together with a timeout task, go through all the completed tasks and filter out the timeout ones, and use await Task.WhenAll() instead of Task.Result to gather all the results.

Here's a complete working solution:

static async Task<TResult[]> WhenAll<TResult>(IEnumerable<Task<TResult>> tasks, TimeSpan timeout)
{
    var timeoutTask = Task.Delay(timeout).ContinueWith(_ => default(TResult));
    var completedTasks = 
        (await Task.WhenAll(tasks.Select(task => Task.WhenAny(task, timeoutTask)))).
        Where(task => task != timeoutTask);
    return await Task.WhenAll(completedTasks);
}
5
  • There are two WhenAll, is there any performance issue? The second WhenAll is to unbox a Task< > ? Can you please explain this? Sep 16 '16 at 15:05
  • 1
    @MenelaosVergis The first Task.WhenAll is performed on tasks that return completed tasks (i.e. the results of Task.WhenAnys). Then I filter these task with a where clause. Finally I use Task.WhenAll on these tasks to extract their actual results. All these task should already be completed at this point.
    – i3arnon
    Sep 17 '16 at 10:53
  • I would suggest configuring the ContinueWith with the TaskScheduler.Default as argument, to avoid running the continuations on any wacky ambient TaskScheduler.Current that might be currently active. For example a UI TaskScheduler, or a LowPriorityTaskScheduler. Sep 24 '21 at 10:50
  • @TheodorZoulias on the contrary, the Current scheculer is the best choice when all the continuation does is make a very short call or just return a value. There's no reason to incur the cost of marshalling the call to another thread. What does it matter if it's the UI TaskScheduler or a low priority scheduler when the thread is already active? If anything, askContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously could be used to ensure the same thread is used to avoid rescheduling Sep 24 '21 at 15:30
  • @TheodorZoulias I don't think you realize that you're telling one of the Microsoft perf engineers that created the performance guidelines that his code is wrong. I think you've misunderstood that guidance and taken it to extremes without understanding why and when it applies. What does it matter what thread is used to return a constant value? As for your solution, have you considered the complexity and cost of so many wrapped tasks that need unwrapping? Sep 24 '21 at 15:55
9

Check out the "Early Bailout" and "Task.Delay" sections from Microsoft's Consuming the Task-based Asynchronous Pattern.

Early bailout. An operation represented by t1 can be grouped in a WhenAny with another task t2, and we can wait on the WhenAny task. t2 could represent a timeout, or cancellation, or some other signal that will cause the WhenAny task to complete prior to t1 completing.

4
  • Do you want to add a summary of what it says?
    – svick
    Nov 4 '12 at 0:06
  • 1
    Not sure why you came back to this post but your code sample is exactly what the paper describes (as I assume you are well aware). At your request, I've updated my answer with the verbatim quote. Nov 5 '12 at 2:35
  • @DavidPeden this link is now broken, google search has brought up this article, not sure if this is the one your referring too. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/…
    – DynaWeb
    Sep 22 '20 at 23:21
  • Thanks. I've updated the link which is the third article under the same root documentation that you linked. Sep 23 '20 at 15:34
2

What you describe seems like a very common demand however I could not find anywhere an example of this. And I searched a lot... I finally created the following:

TimeSpan timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5.0);

Task<Task>[] tasksOfTasks =
{
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("a"), Task.Delay(timeout)),
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("b"), Task.Delay(timeout)),
    Task.WhenAny(SomeTaskAsync("c"), Task.Delay(timeout))
};

Task[] completedTasks = await Task.WhenAll(tasksOfTasks);

List<MyResult> = completedTasks.OfType<Task<MyResult>>().Select(task => task.Result).ToList();

I assume here a method SomeTaskAsync that returns Task<MyResult>.

From the members of completedTasks, only tasks of type MyResult are our own tasks that managed to beat the clock. Task.Delay returns a different type. This requires some compromise on typing, but still works beautifully and quite simple.

(The array can of course be built dynamically using a query + ToArray).

  • Note that this implementation does not require SomeTaskAsync to receive a cancellation token.
3
  • This looks like something that should be encapsulated into a helper method.
    – svick
    Aug 31 '14 at 20:19
  • @ErezCohen I've made my answer even simpler, if you want to take a look: stackoverflow.com/a/25733275/885318
    – i3arnon
    Sep 9 '14 at 19:49
  • 1
    @I3arnon - Nice!. I like it.
    – Erez Cohen
    Sep 11 '14 at 8:55
2

In addition to timeout, I also check the cancellation which is useful if you are building a web app.

public static async Task WhenAll(
    IEnumerable<Task> tasks, 
    int millisecondsTimeOut,
    CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    using(Task timeoutTask = Task.Delay(millisecondsTimeOut))
    using(Task cancellationMonitorTask = Task.Delay(-1, cancellationToken))
    {
        Task completedTask = await Task.WhenAny(
            Task.WhenAll(tasks), 
            timeoutTask, 
            cancellationMonitorTask
        );

        if (completedTask == timeoutTask)
        {
            throw new TimeoutException();
        }
        if (completedTask == cancellationMonitorTask)
        {
            throw new OperationCanceledException();
        }
        await completedTask;
    }
}
5
  • 2
    There's an issue with this code: if any regular tasks complete, the timeout task is not awaited.. so your code will run until the timeout Task is disposed and if that's before the timeout task has run to the end, you'll get an InvalidStateOperation. Leave the tasks standing and you're fine. Nov 5 '19 at 20:38
  • @TheodorZoulias You need to dispose the tasks. It is up to the caller to decide how to handle the running tasks if timeout occurs or a cancellation is raised.
    – Tony
    Sep 27 '21 at 23:22
  • Tony in the linked article Stephen Toub says "No. Don’t bother disposing of your tasks.". You say "You need to dispose the tasks." I am confused. Whose advice should I follow? Sep 27 '21 at 23:40
  • @TheodorZoulias I apologize for the confusion. What I meant is it is up to the caller to decide whether the remaining IEnumerable<Task> tasks should continue to run, or should be cancelled/stopped (disposed) them if a cancellation or timeout occurs. I have used the term "dispose" loosely. You don't have to call Task.Dispose.
    – Tony
    Oct 5 '21 at 23:22
1

Check out a custom task combinator proposed in http://tutorials.csharp-online.net/Task_Combinators

async static Task<TResult> WithTimeout<TResult> 
   (this Task<TResult> task, TimeSpan timeout)
 {
   Task winner = await (Task.WhenAny 
      (task, Task.Delay (timeout)));
   if (winner != task) throw new TimeoutException();
   return await task; // Unwrap result/re-throw
}

I have not tried it yet.

1
  • a) The link is broken. b) This works for a single task, which isn't what the OP asked about.
    – i3arnon
    Sep 8 '14 at 22:27
1

void result version of @i3arnon 's answer, along with comments and changing first argument to use extension this.

I've also got a forwarding method specifying timeout as an int using TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(millisecondsTimeout) to match other Task methods.

public static async Task WhenAll(this IEnumerable<Task> tasks, TimeSpan timeout)
{
  // Create a timeout task.
  var timeoutTask = Task.Delay(timeout);

  // Get the completed tasks made up of...
  var completedTasks =
  (
    // ...all tasks specified
    await Task.WhenAll(tasks

    // Now finish when its task has finished or the timeout task finishes
    .Select(task => Task.WhenAny(task, timeoutTask)))
  )
  // ...but not the timeout task
  .Where(task => task != timeoutTask);

  // And wait for the internal WhenAll to complete.
  await Task.WhenAll(completedTasks);
}
0

Seems like the Task.WaitAll overload with the timeout parameter is all you need - if it returns true, then you know they all completed - otherwise, you can filter on IsCompleted.

if (Task.WaitAll(tasks, myTimeout) == false)
{
    tasks = tasks.Where(t => t.IsCompleted);
}
...
4
  • I think these tasks are all started in there own threads and the new async functions are not, but correct me if I'm wrong. I'm just starting this new async stuff.
    – broersa
    Mar 25 '12 at 9:39
  • 4
    Task.WaitAll() is blocking, so it's not a good idea to use it in C# 5, if you can avoid it.
    – svick
    Mar 25 '12 at 12:31
  • @broersa First, I think you got that wrong, the relation between threads and Tasks or async methods is not that simple. Second, why would that matter?
    – svick
    Mar 25 '12 at 12:33
  • @svick Blocking is the word I sought. Things are getting clear now.
    – broersa
    Mar 26 '12 at 7:34
0

I came to the following piece of code that does what I needed:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Json;
using System.Threading;

namespace MyAsync
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
            Console.WriteLine("Start Main");
            List<Task<List<MyObject>>> listoftasks = new List<Task<List<MyObject>>>();
            listoftasks.Add(GetGoogle(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetTwitter(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetSleep(cts));
            listoftasks.Add(GetxSleep(cts));

            List<MyObject>[] arrayofanswers = Task.WhenAll(listoftasks).Result;
            List<MyObject> answer = new List<MyObject>();
            foreach (List<MyObject> answers in arrayofanswers)
            {
                answer.AddRange(answers);
            }
            foreach (MyObject o in answer)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", o.name, o.origin);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Press <Enter>");
            Console.ReadLine();
        } 

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetGoogle(CancellationTokenSource cts) 
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetGoogle");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                var client = new HttpClient();
                Task<HttpResponseMessage> awaitable = client.GetAsync("http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=broersa", cts.Token);
                HttpResponseMessage res = await awaitable;
                Console.WriteLine("After GetGoogle GetAsync");
                dynamic data = JsonValue.Parse(res.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);
                Console.WriteLine("After GetGoogle ReadAsStringAsync");
                foreach (var r in data.responseData.results)
                {
                    l.Add(new MyObject() { name = r.titleNoFormatting, origin = "google" });
                }
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }
        }

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetTwitter(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetTwitter");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                var client = new HttpClient();
                Task<HttpResponseMessage> awaitable = client.GetAsync("http://search.twitter.com/search.json?q=broersa&rpp=5&include_entities=true&result_type=mixed",cts.Token);
                HttpResponseMessage res = await awaitable;
                Console.WriteLine("After GetTwitter GetAsync");
                dynamic data = JsonValue.Parse(res.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);
                Console.WriteLine("After GetTwitter ReadAsStringAsync");
                foreach (var r in data.results)
                {
                    l.Add(new MyObject() { name = r.text, origin = "twitter" });
                }
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }
        }

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetSleep(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Start GetSleep");
                List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
                await Task.Delay(5000,cts.Token);
                l.Add(new MyObject() { name = "Slept well", origin = "sleep" });
                return l;
            }
            catch (TaskCanceledException)
            {
                return new List<MyObject>();
            }

        } 

        static async Task<List<MyObject>> GetxSleep(CancellationTokenSource cts)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Start GetxSleep");
            List<MyObject> l = new List<MyObject>();
            await Task.Delay(2000);
            cts.Cancel();
            l.Add(new MyObject() { name = "Slept short", origin = "xsleep" });
            return l;
        } 

    }
}

My explanation is in my blogpost: http://blog.bekijkhet.com/2012/03/c-async-examples-whenall-whenany.html

0
0

In addition to svick's answer, the following works for me when I have to wait for a couple of tasks to complete but have to process something else while I'm waiting:

Task[] TasksToWaitFor = //Your tasks
TimeSpan Timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds( 30 );

while( true )
{
    await Task.WhenAny( Task.WhenAll( TasksToWaitFor ), Task.Delay( Timeout ) );
    if( TasksToWaitFor.All( a => a.IsCompleted ) )
        break;

    //Do something else here
}
0

You can use the following code:

        var timeoutTime = 10;

        var tasksResult = await Task.WhenAll(
                                listOfTasks.Select(x => Task.WhenAny(
                                    x, Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(timeoutTime)))
                                )
                            );


        var succeededtasksResponses = tasksResult
                                               .OfType<Task<MyResult>>()
                                               .Select(task => task.Result);

        if (succeededtasksResponses.Count() != listOfTasks.Count())
        {
            // Not all tasks were completed
            // Throw error or do whatever you want
        }

        //You can use the succeededtasksResponses that contains the list of successful responses

How it works:

You need to put in the timeoutTime variable the limit of time for all tasks to be completed. So basically all tasks will wait in maximum the time that you set in timeoutTime. When all the tasks return the result, the timeout will not occur and the tasksResult will be set.

After that we are only getting the completed tasks. The tasks that were not completed will have no results.

0

I tried to improve on the excellent i3arnon's solution, in order to fix some minor issues, but I ended up with a completely different implementation. The two issues that I tried to solve are:

  1. In case more than one of the tasks fail, propagate the errors of all failed tasks, and not just the error of the first failed task in the list.
  2. Prevent memory leaks in case all tasks complete much faster than the timeout. Leaking an active Task.Delay might result in a non-negligible amount of leaked memory, in case the WhenAll is called in a loop, and the timeout is large.

On top of that I added a cancellationToken argument, XML documentation that explains what this method is doing, and argument validation. Here it is:

/// <summary>
/// Returns a task that will complete when all of the tasks have completed,
/// or when the timeout has elapsed, or when the token is canceled, whatever
/// comes first. In case the tasks complete first, the task contains the
/// results/exceptions of all the tasks. In case the timeout elapsed first,
/// the task contains the results/exceptions of the completed tasks only.
/// In case the token is canceled first, the task is canceled. To determine
/// whether a timeout has occured, compare the number of the results with
/// the number of the tasks.
/// </summary>
public static Task<TResult[]> WhenAll<TResult>(
    Task<TResult>[] tasks,
    TimeSpan timeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken = default)
{
    if (tasks == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(tasks));
    if (tasks.Any(t => t == null)) throw new ArgumentException(
        $"The {nameof(tasks)} argument included a null value.", nameof(tasks));
    if (timeout < TimeSpan.Zero && timeout != Timeout.InfiniteTimeSpan)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(timeout));

    var cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(cancellationToken);
    cts.CancelAfter(timeout);

    var continuations = tasks.Select(task => task.ContinueWith(_ => { }, cts.Token,
        TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously, TaskScheduler.Default));

    return Task.WhenAll(continuations).ContinueWith(whenAllContinuations =>
    {
        cts.Dispose();
        if (whenAllContinuations.IsCompletedSuccessfully) return Task.WhenAll(tasks);
        cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        return Task.WhenAll(tasks.Where(task => task.IsCompleted));
    }, TaskScheduler.Default).Unwrap();
}

This WhenAll implementation elides async and await, which is not advisable in general. In this case it is necessary, in order to propagate all the errors in a not nested AggregateException. The intention is to simulate the behavior of the built-in Task.WhenAll method as accurately as possible.

Usage example:

string[] results;
Task<string[]> whenAllTask = WhenAll(tasks, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15));
try
{
    results = await whenAllTask;
}
catch when (whenAllTask.IsFaulted) // It might also be canceled
{
    // Log all errors
    foreach (var innerEx in whenAllTask.Exception.InnerExceptions)
    {
        _logger.LogError(innerEx, innerEx.Message);
    }
    throw; // Propagate the error of the first failed task
}
if (results.Length < tasks.Length) throw new TimeoutException();
return results;

Note: the above API has a design flaw. In case at least one of the tasks has failed or has been canceled, there is no way to determine whether a timeout has occurred. The Exception.InnerExceptions property of the task returned by the WhenAll may contain the exceptions of all tasks, or part of the tasks, and there is no way to say which is which. Unfortunately I can't think of a solution to this problem.

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