7

It's my understanding that if I want to get the ID of an item in a list, I can do this:

private static void a()
{
    List<string> list = new List<string> {"Box", "Gate", "Car"};
    Predicate<string> predicate = new Predicate<string>(getBoxId);
    int boxId = list.FindIndex(predicate);
}

private static bool getBoxId(string item)
{
    return (item == "box");
}

But what if I want to make the comparison dynamic? So instead of checking if item=="box", I want to pass in a user-entered string to the delegate, and check if item==searchString.

18

Using a compiler-generated closure via an anonymous method or lambda is a good way to use a custom value in a predicate expression.

private static void findMyString(string str)
{
    List<string> list = new List<string> {"Box", "Gate", "Car"};
    int boxId = list.FindIndex(s => s == str);
}

If you're using .NET 2.0 (no lambda), this will work as well:

private static void findMyString(string str)
{
    List<string> list = new List<string> {"Box", "Gate", "Car"};
    int boxId = list.FindIndex(delegate (string s) { return s == str; });
}
1
  • Beautiful mate, thanks! Looking forward to my 3.0 upgrade so I can use those lambdas. – ChristianLinnell Jun 12 '09 at 4:36
2

You can just do

string item = "Car";
...

int itemId = list.FindIndex(a=>a == item);
1
string toLookFor = passedInString;
int boxId = list.FindIndex(new Predicate((s) => (s == toLookFor)));
0
List <string>  list= new List<string>("Box", "Gate", "Car");
string SearchStr ="Box";

    int BoxId= 0;
        foreach (string SearchString in list)
        {
            if (str == SearchString)
            {
                BoxId= list.IndexOf(str);
                break;
            }
        }

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