53

Simple question but this is killing my time.

Any simple solution to add 30 minutes to current time in php with GMT+8?

12 Answers 12

125

I think one of the best solutions and easiest is:

strtotime("+30 minutes")

Maybe it's not the most efficient but is one of the more understandable.

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  • Why the downvote, this is a valid method for adding a time interval? – Neil Aitken Jun 12 '09 at 14:01
  • 3
    @Khriz: I'm not clear on how to use strtotime() with your example relative to a datetime. Can you get more specific? – TMC Aug 15 '11 at 8:45
  • If you want to use strtotime relatively to an existing datetime you can do code strtotime('2011-11-01 + 2 days'); – Khriz Nov 3 '11 at 12:13
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    i would upvote this two times if i could. firstly because of the straightforward solution and secondly because some people thought of downvoting this. – pduersteler Jan 11 '12 at 13:20
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    Just show how it is used eg. date("Y-m-d", strtotime("+30 minutes")) that's why it might get down voted ;) – Sydwell Apr 6 '13 at 13:16
57

This is an old question that seems answered, but as someone pointed out above, if you use the DateTime class and PHP < 5.3.0, you can't use the add method, but you can use modify:

$date = new DateTime();
$date->modify("+30 minutes"); //or whatever value you want
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  • You could also use it without modify() function like $date = new DateTime('+30 minutes'); – GrandFelix Jan 22 at 9:07
9
$timeIn30Minutes = mktime(idate("H"), idate("i") + 30);

or

$timeIn30Minutes = time() + 30*60; // 30 minutes * 60 seconds/minute

The result will be a UNIX timestamp of the current time plus 30 minutes.

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9

Time 30 minutes later

$newTime = date("Y-m-d H:i:s",strtotime(date("Y-m-d H:i:s")." +30 minutes"))
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3
echo $date = date('H:i:s', strtotime('13:00:00 + 30 minutes') );

13:00:00 - any inputted time

30 minutes - any interval you wish (20 hours, 10 minutes, 1 seconds etc...)

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2

It looks like you are after the DateTime function add - use it like this:

$date = new DateTime();
date_add($date, new DateInterval("PT30M"));

(Note: untested, but according to the docs, it should work)

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  • 1
    That's a PHP >= 5.3.0 solution as the function ad the class DateInterval is not available in earlier versions. – Stefan Gehrig Jun 12 '09 at 10:03
  • Yes, but the title does specify Date Time, so I assume he is using the DateTime class – a_m0d Jun 12 '09 at 10:14
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    DateTime is part of PHP >= 5.2.0 but DateInterval as well as some DateTime methods are not available prior to 5.3.0. – Stefan Gehrig Jun 12 '09 at 10:45
  • @a_m0d @tokam Doc says it must start with a "P" for "Period", so, this is the correct way to add 30 minutes: new DateInterval('PT30M') (Tested! :)) – Willy Barro Mar 9 '12 at 21:20
2
$ck=2016-09-13 14:12:33;
$endtime = date('H-i-s', strtotime("+05 minutes", strtotime($ck)));  
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1
$dateTime = new DateTime('now', new DateTimeZone('Asia/Kolkata')); 
echo $dateTime->modify("+10 minutes")->format("H:i:s A");
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  • 2
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem (and ideally how it improves upon other answers) would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – David Buck Mar 27 at 19:55
0

In addition to Khriz's answer.

If you need to add 5 minutes to the current time in Mysql format you can do:

$cur_time=date("Y-m-d H:i:s");
$duration='+5 minutes';
echo date('Y-m-d H:i:s', strtotime($duration, strtotime($cur_time)));
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0

time after 30 min, this easiest solution in php

date('Y-m-d H:i:s', strtotime("+30 minutes"));

for DateTime class (PHP 5 >= 5.2.0, PHP 7)

$dateobj = new DateTime();
$dateobj ->modify("+30 minutes"); 
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0

The question is a little old, but I come back to it often ;p

Another way, which is also a one liner:

<?= date_create('2111-11-11 00:00:00')->modify("+30 minutes")->format('Y-m-d h:i:s') ?>

Or from timestamp, returns Y-m-d h:i:s:

<?= date_create('@'.time())->modify("+30 minutes")->format('Y-m-d h:i:s') ?>

Or from timestamp, returns timestamp:

<?= date_create('@'.time())->modify("+30 minutes")->format('U') ?>
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-1
$time = strtotime(date('2016-02-03 12:00:00'));
        echo date("H:i:s",strtotime("-30 minutes", $time));
| improve this answer | |
  • The question was "Any simple solution to add 30 minutes to current time". – Pang Feb 4 '16 at 0:50

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