30

I need to create a product catalog, in tree type.

every tree node presents by a ID(string), the functions on the tree data only 2:

  1. getChild(string ID), give a ID, get children (no need include childrens' children), if ID is null, get all root nodes
  2. getParent(string ID), return parent ID if have, or null if is root

Since once the tree decided, will not change, so I think put all code in static will be best. So I start to try use Dictionary

"id": {parent:ID, child:[id2, id3, id4....]}

Since theres about 1000+ catalog, I found I quickly mess myself up, lots of mistake in the static data, and make final result on usable. Also, now I only wrote dozens and the code is looking like mess.

Please advice a way create this simple catalog tree with high performance. Thanks

7
  • What is your original data source? XML? Entities? Json? Mar 25, 2012 at 12:51
  • original data is on another total different language, so I need to write this in c#, plain hard coded c# code is fine for me since once done, the structure will not change.
    – Eric Yin
    Mar 25, 2012 at 12:56
  • 9
    "since once done, the structure will not change".... doubt that :D
    – Jeroen
    Mar 25, 2012 at 12:57
  • @Jeroen, maybe need change, then I just put extra code, recompile, redeployment. It will not happen everyday.
    – Eric Yin
    Mar 25, 2012 at 13:00
  • A robust tree structure withstands the test of time (and feature requests).
    – IAbstract
    Mar 25, 2012 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

65

Just make a class out of it.

UPDATED:

class TreeNode : IEnumerable<TreeNode>
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, TreeNode> _children =
                                        new Dictionary<string, TreeNode>();

    public readonly string ID;
    public TreeNode Parent { get; private set; }

    public TreeNode(string id)
    {
        this.ID = id;
    }

    public TreeNode GetChild(string id)
    {
        return this._children[id];
    }

    public void Add(TreeNode item)
    {
        if (item.Parent != null)
        {
            item.Parent._children.Remove(item.ID);
        }

        item.Parent = this;
        this._children.Add(item.ID, item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<TreeNode> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this._children.Values.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return this._children.Count; }
    }
}

Usage will be fairly simple to statically define:

var tree = new TreeNode("Root")
               {
                   new TreeNode("Category 1")
                       {
                           new TreeNode("Item 1"),
                           new TreeNode("Item 2"),
                           new TreeNode("Item 3"),
                       },
                   new TreeNode("Category 2")
                       {
                           new TreeNode("Item 1"),
                           new TreeNode("Item 2"),
                           new TreeNode("Item 3"),
                           new TreeNode("Item 4"),
                       }
               };

Edit

Some more functionality for even easier creation...

public static TreeNode BuildTree(string tree)
{
    var lines = tree.Split(new[] { Environment.NewLine },
                           StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

    var result = new TreeNode("TreeRoot");
    var list = new List<TreeNode> { result };

    foreach (var line in lines)
    {
        var trimmedLine = line.Trim();
        var indent = line.Length - trimmedLine.Length;

        var child = new TreeNode(trimmedLine);
        list[indent].Add(child);

        if (indent + 1 < list.Count)
        {
            list[indent + 1] = child;
        }
        else
        {
            list.Add(child);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

public static string BuildString(TreeNode tree)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();

    BuildString(sb, tree, 0);

    return sb.ToString();
}

private static void BuildString(StringBuilder sb, TreeNode node, int depth)
{
    sb.AppendLine(node.ID.PadLeft(node.ID.Length + depth));

    foreach (var child in node)
    {
        BuildString(sb, child, depth + 1);
    }
}


Usage:

var tree = TreeNode.BuildTree(@"
Cat1
 Sub1
  Item1
  Item2
  Item3
 Sub2
  Item1
  Item2
Cat2
 Sub1
 Sub2
  Item1
  Item2
 Sub3
  Item1
Cat3
Cat4");
21
  • 1
    @EricYin See updates and edits, and also note that you can make the Add method private if you wish, by making the static TreeNode ctor build the static tree, or you could "signal" the tree to become read-only so the Add method will become obsolete or throw a readonly exception. Mar 25, 2012 at 14:52
  • 1
    @YoryeNathan: +1 Nice work. You might consider an AttachTo(TreeNode parent) method for setting the parent, and the parent's children accordingly. Maybe a Detach() method also. Mar 25, 2012 at 14:55
  • 1
    The getChild method is an instance mehod. It returns the child of the tree node that has the specified name. To get all childs of Cat2, for example, you should the instance of Cat2 as an IEnumerator. Regarding the root - you should keep a static reference to the root, as ot is your entry point for all other nodes. To find a node with a specific id, not necesseraly a direct child of a node, you should use a static recursion based method using the root as the search start, or also keep a static dictionary to contain ALL nodes. Mar 25, 2012 at 22:06
  • 1
    Nevermind! I found the solution here: code.google.com/p/yet-another-tree-structure/wiki/CSharpTree Oct 1, 2015 at 15:58
  • 1
    With Net Core I was required to cast the IEnumerator IEnumerable return to a IEnumerator type. Sep 30, 2017 at 21:02
15

I created a Node class that could be helpfull. It is fast and has some extra properties, like:

  • Ancestors
  • Descendants
  • Siblings
  • Level of the node
  • Parent
  • Root
  • Etc.
0
1

You can write a simple binary tree , I wrote some Pseudo code beloew:

class TreeNode {
    TreeNode Right;
    TreeNode Left;
    int id;
    //...
}

class BinTree {

    void Insert(TreeNode node)
    {
        while(true) {   
            if(node.id > target.id) {
                if(target.Right != null) {
                    target = target.Right;
                    continue;
                }
                else {
                    target.Right = node;
                    break;
                }
            }

            else if(node.id < target.id) {
                if(target.Left != null) {
                    target = target.Left;
                    continue;
                }
                else {
                    target.Left = node;
                    break;
                }   
            }

            else {
                throw new ArgumentException("Duplicated id");
            }
        }
    }


    TreeNode Search(int id)
    {
        TreeNode target = root;

        while(target != null) {
            if(id > target.id) {
                target = target.Right;
            }
            else if(id < target.id) {
                target = target.Left;
            }
            else {
                return target;
            }
        }

        return null;
    }

}

But if your data count is very large, maybe AVL tree is more efficient

8
  • 1
    -1 Doesn't answer his need at all. He wants a tree for a product catalog. Binary tree is far from what he needs, and even after that, he doesn't need it balanced or sorted in any matter, as the catalog has a logical structure to maintain. Mar 25, 2012 at 13:30
  • +1: Not what I was thinking of, but the OP didn't give a preference to the type of tree structure.
    – IAbstract
    Mar 25, 2012 at 13:39
  • 1
    @YoryeNathan: I disagree. The OP didn't give a preference except for 2 requirements: simple, performance. This answer provides both. Simplicity may be lost on those that don't understand what the tree is doing, but it is certainly more efficient than the linear (or unbalanced) tree.
    – IAbstract
    Mar 25, 2012 at 13:42
  • 4
    @IAbstract One thing is to read what the person is asking for, and another thing is understanding what he needs. He needs to represent a catalog, which has no binary-tree properties/constraints whatsoever. Mar 25, 2012 at 13:50
  • @YoryeNathan: I understood what the OP was asking and my initial thought was the same sort of structure you presented. This answer has merit and could be implemented to serve the OP's needs. If performance is going to be an issue, then this is the better of the two options. If simplicity is preferred, then the standard unbalanced tree is the better of the two options.
    – IAbstract
    Mar 25, 2012 at 14:33

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