61

If I have a class Foo in namespace bar:

namespace bar
{
    class Foo { ... }
};

I can then:

using Baz = bar::Foo;

and now it is just like I defined the class in my namespace with the name Baz.

Is it possible to do the same for functions?

namespace bar
{
    void f();
}

And then:

using g = bar::f; // error: ‘f’ in namespace ‘bar’ does not name a type

What is the cleanest way to do this?

The solution should also hold for template functions.

Definition: If some entity B is an alias of A, than if any or all usages (not declarations or definitions of course) of A are replaced by B in the source code than the (stripped) generated code remains the same. For example typedef A B is an alias. #define B A is an alias (at least). T& B = A is not an alias, B can effectively implemented as an indirect pointer, wheres an "unaliased" A can use "immediate semantics".

  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: There is little confusion over what "alias" means in the above. In general if B is an alias of A, than if you replace usages of A with B, than the generated code remains unchanged. Why you would want this is also straightforward. I want to give a library function a second name/namespace. I suspect the cleanest way is to just wrap a call to the old name with an always_inline function of the new name. The wrapper will be compiled out, leaving something indistinguishable from a direct call to the old name, as desired. – Andrew Tomazos Mar 25 '12 at 23:47
  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: A function pointer would produce different code than a normal function call as the function pointer needs to be dereferenced before the call. – Andrew Tomazos Mar 26 '12 at 15:44
  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Once again, Generated Code. See my second comment above where I define what an alias means. – Andrew Tomazos Mar 26 '12 at 16:09
  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Under what circumstances would the solution of wrapping the function call in an inline function not produce the same generated code? – Andrew Tomazos Mar 26 '12 at 18:24
  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas: As I said "always_inline" refering to the attribute(s) that force inlining. See section 6.39 An Inline Function is As Fast As a Macro in the GCC manual. – Andrew Tomazos Mar 26 '12 at 18:53
64

You can define a function alias (with some work) using perfect forwarding:

template <typename... Args>
auto g(Args&&... args) -> decltype(f(std::forward<Args>(args)...)) {
  return f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

This solution does apply even if f is overloaded and/or a function template.

  • 3
    It doesn't apply if f is a function template that can't use type deduction. – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 25 '12 at 23:07
  • 3
    @user1131467 Any function that uses a template argument to determine its return type (like boost::lexical_cast), or uses a template argument as a de facto argument (like std::get). – R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 26 '12 at 0:06
  • 3
    @RMartin if it would assume "ExplicitArgs" to be empty if you don't specify it could rewrite it to template<typename ...ExplicitArgs, typename ...Args> void foo(Args...args) and call the other one like f<ExplicitArgs...>(args...). Unfortunately it only does the "assume-to-be-empty" for a trailing template parameter pack, and not for the one-before-trailing one. – Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 26 '12 at 18:41
  • 2
    @RMartin actually GCC and Clang already do exactly that, so that the above ExplicitArgs way even works in the wild! They consider both template parameter packs "trailing". – Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 26 '12 at 18:49
  • 1
    The correct and shorter answer which also avoids the problems of ExplicitArgs is given by Jason Haslam below! – Johannes Jendersie Sep 14 '17 at 9:34
21

Classes are types, so they can be aliased with typedef and using (in C++11).

Functions are much more like objects, so there's no mechanism to alias them. At best you could use function pointers or function references:

void (*g)() = &bar::f;
void (&h)() = bar::f;

g();
h();

In the same vein, there's no mechanism for aliasing variables (short of through pointers or references).

  • 1
    @user1131467: You declare and define a new object. – Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 21:21
  • 1
    What is the type of that object? And what is going on here: inline void g() { bar::f(); } – Andrew Tomazos Mar 25 '12 at 21:22
  • 2
    Bashphorism 2 alert?! That last one defines an entirely new function. – Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 21:25
  • 1
    @Hurkyl: There's no real difference between function references and pointers, as the former always immediately decay into the latter. You can say foo(), (*foo)() and (**foo)() as much as you like. – Kerrek SB Mar 25 '12 at 23:05
  • 3
    @KerrekSB I am saying that if you have void f(); void (&rf)() = f; then both &f and &rf yield the address of f. But if rf would be a function pointer, void (*rf)() = f;, then &rf returns its address rather than that of the function, which is bad. – Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 26 '12 at 18:42
17

The constexpr function pointer can be used as a function alias.

namespace bar
{
    int f();
}

constexpr auto g = bar::f;

In the place where the alias is used the compiler will call the aliased function even when compiling without any optimizations.

With GCC7 the following usage

int main()
{
    return g();
}

becomes

main:
  push rbp
  mov rbp, rsp
  call bar::f()  # bar::f() called directly.
  pop rbp
  ret

The assembly was generated in Compiler Explorer.

15

Absolutely:

#include <iostream>

namespace Bar
{
   void test()
   {
      std::cout << "Test\n";
   }


   template<typename T>
   void test2(T const& a)
   {
      std::cout << "Test: " << a << std::endl;
   }
}

void (&alias)()        = Bar::test;
void (&a2)(int const&) = Bar::test2<int>;

int main()
{
    Bar::test();
    alias();
    a2(3);
}

Try:

> g++ a.cpp
> ./a.out
Test
Test
Test: 3
>

A reference is an alias to an existing object.
I just created a reference to a function. The reference can be used in exactly the same way as the original object.

  • Doesn't this require an extra dereference when alias is called? Also how does this work for template functions? – Andrew Tomazos Mar 26 '12 at 0:44
  • AS you can see it works fine. With templates it works for specific instantiations you can not alias a template but you can alias a specific version of a template. – Martin York Mar 26 '12 at 0:58
  • 9
    A better idiom for this is: constexpr auto &alias = Bar::test;. The constexpr part guarantees that the reference will be substituted at compile-time. The auto part won't work for a templated function, though. – Richard Smith Mar 27 '12 at 5:36
  • 1
    "A reference is an alias to an existing object. I just created a reference to a function." -- and functions are not objects. So references-to-function are not an alias to an existing object (just as function pointers are not object pointers) :-) – Steve Jessop Feb 19 '14 at 22:44
  • 1
    @RichardSmith you should convert that comment to an answer - it's great! – Manveru Nov 3 '17 at 10:17
11

It is possible to introduce the function into a different scope without changing its name. So you can alias a function with a different qualified name:

namespace bar {
  void f();
}

namespace baz {
  using bar::f;
}

void foo() {
  baz::f();
}
  • I don't know why this isn't the accepted answer: I just tried it and it works, even for template functions (without needing to be prefixed with template <typename> to do so). As far as I can tell it pulls in all of the overloads for the name. – Dennis Sep 29 '16 at 20:24
  • This is the best solution, but does not work for inlines: namespace bar { static inline __attribute__((always_inline)) void f(); } namespace baz { using bar::f; } void foo() { baz::f(); } $ g++ -g -std=gnu++11 -x c++ -Wall -Wextra -c tns.C x.C:3:8: warning: inline function 'void bar::f()' used but never defined void f(); ^ tns.C: In function 'void foo()': tns.C:3:8: error: inlining failed in call to always_inline '...': function body not available x.C:11:11: error: called from here baz::f(); – JVD Apr 1 '18 at 11:51
  • namespace bar { static inline __attribute__((always_inline)) void f(); } namespace baz { using bar::f; } void foo() { baz::f(); } – JVD Apr 1 '18 at 11:58
7

It's not standard C++, but most compilers provide a way of doing this. With GCC you can do this:

void f () __attribute__ ((weak, alias ("__f")));

This creates the symbol f as an alias for __f. With VC++ you do the same thing this way:

#pragma comment(linker, "/export:f=__f")
  • And will this work with overloaded functions, templates, everything? – einpoklum - reinstate Monica Apr 27 '16 at 20:40
  • @einpoklum Yes - ish. You can make the compiler emit an alias for any concrete function that it generates - they're just entry points in an executable object with names assigned to them, after all. Overloaded functions are just functions, with the name mangled to reflect the function signature. Template functions don't have executable names themselves, but instantiations of those template functions do - and the compiler can emit aliases for them. Whether it's much use to you is another matter. – Tom Oct 3 '16 at 10:28
  • One difficulty with this is that you must use the mangled symbol name for the function in the alias( ) declaration. Your example looks wrong (for this reason); or even if it's correct on some system, it will be much more complicated for a function with parameters.. – davmac Oct 17 '16 at 11:19
  • @Davmac: only if you want the alias to be a mangled name. There is nothing wrong with creating an unmangled alias, though it will be of more use from languages other than C++. – Tom Oct 17 '16 at 11:26
  • @Tom I'm not saying the alias will be mangled (or not). It is the symbol that you want to alias to that is problematic. If it is mangled then you must use the mangled name to create the alias. The question asks about creating an alias for bar::foo so you would have to use the mangled name of that symbol when creating the alias. Eg it won't be "__foo", more like "_ZN3bar3fooEv". – davmac Oct 17 '16 at 11:46
1

You can use good old macros

namespace bar
{
    void f();
}

#define f bar::f

int main()
{
    f();
}
  • This can have very unexpected effects depending on the name of the macro. See this answer for reasons (especially the "Macros have no namespace" is dangerous here). – Ignitor Aug 14 at 14:17

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